Rent It Came from Outer Space (1953)

3.4 of 5 from 79 ratings
1h 17min
Rent It Came from Outer Space Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Amateur astronomer John Putnam (Richard Carlson) and his fiancee Ellen Fields (Barbara Rush) are stargazing in the desert when a spaceship bursts from the sky and crashes to the ground. Just before a landslide buries the ship, a mysterious creature emerges and disappears into the darkness. Of course, when he tells his story to the sheriff , John is branded a crackpot; but before long, strange things begin to happen, and the tide of disbelief turns... Based on a story by acclaimed writer Ray Bradbury.
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
William Alland
Writers:
Harry Essex, Ray Bradbury
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
Classics, Horror, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/03/2006
Run Time:
77 minutes
Languages:
English, German
Subtitles:
Czech, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Hungarian, Norwegian, Polish, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
B & W
Bonus:
  • The Universe According to Universal: an original documentary on It Came From Outer Space
  • Feature Commentary with Film Historian Tom Weaver
  • Photograph and Poster Gallery
  • Theatrical Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
17/10/2016
Run Time:
80 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
Canadian French, English Hard of Hearing, Latin American Spanish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Mixed
Colour:
B & W
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • The Universe: According to Universal An Original Documentary on 'It Came From Outer Space'
  • Feature Commentary with Film Historian Tom Weaver
  • Theatrical Trailer

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Reviews (1) of It Came from Outer Space

Invasion of the Tree Impersonators! - It Came from Outer Space review by Count Otto Black

Spoiler Alert
05/10/2016

This is one those old sci-fi movies which, while you can see why it's regarded as a minor classic, hasn't aged that well. Its most striking feature is the concept, then almost unheard of in B-movies, that space aliens who look monstrous by our standards of beauty aren't necessarily evil. Since 1953, we've seen plenty of films in which freaky-looking extraterrestrials aren't the bad guys, so the main plot, which revolves around the highly intelligent and enlightened hero being prepared to accept that these strange and terrifying entities mean us no harm but not being absolutely sure it's true, isn't anywhere near as original now as it was over 60 years ago.

The biggest problem with this movie is that, since it's trying to be a thriller where instead of not knowing who the murderer is, we don't know whether the space monsters are good or bad, the aliens can't do anything which unambiguously shows them to be evil, meaning that the kind of army-versus-space-robots ray-gun action you expect in this type of film is in very short supply, though there is a little bit towards the end. Bearing in mind the special effects available at the time, it was a sensible decision to give the aliens in their true form as little screen-time as possible and never allow the viewer to look at them for very long, but actually the rubber suits are quite effective (the artist who designed the DVD cover above obviously didn't bother to watch the film, since the aliens look nothing like that, and have only one eye). And the "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" notion of aliens replacing humans with lookalikes is well handled, giving the supporting cast a chance to play dual rĂ´les as ordinary decent folks and creepily emotionless space invaders.

Richard Carlson, not exactly a household name, isn't the most exciting of heroes, though Barbara Rush as his girlfriend makes more of an impression, mainly because she gets to play an alien too and go all weird. And that blonde on the DVD cover is in the film for about 30 seconds (like I said, the artist didn't bother to watch it). Some of the dialogue is horribly clunky, such as the moment when one character explains at length that the thermometer currently registers the exact temperature at which humans are most likely to become irrationally violent, then immediately becomes irrationally violent. But on the whole, it's a pretty good though somewhat actionless psychological sci-fi movie which would have made a superb episode of "The Twilight Zone" or "The Outer Limits", but feels a little stretched as a feature film. Though on the plus side, the fact that it was originally shown in 3D isn't obtrusive, apart from some shots of falling rocks that go on for a bit too long. So, perhaps it is a classic, but it's certainly a minor and dated one. And I'm afraid it's nowhere near as much fun as the quite similar "I Married a Monster From Outer Space".

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