Rent The Fabelmans (2022)

3.5 of 5 from 433 ratings
2h 24min
Rent The Fabelmans (aka Untitled Steven Spielberg/Amblin Partners Project / Untitled Steven Spielberg Project) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Inspired by Steven Spielberg's own childhood, rediscover the magic of movies in 'The Fabelmans', a coming-of-age story about a young man uncovering a shattering family secret and the power of film and imagination to help us see the truth about ourselves and each other. With a star-studded cast featuring Michelle Williams, Paul Daho, Seth Rogen, Gabriel LaBelle and Judd Hirsch, 'The Fabelmans' tells a timeless tale of heartbreak, healing, and hope for the dreamer inside all of us.
Actors:
, , , , Mateo Zoryon Francis-DeFord, , Alina Brace, , Birdie Borria, , Sophia Kopera, , , Sam Rechner, , , , , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Tony Kushner, Kristie Macosko Krieger, Steven Spielberg
Writers:
Steven Spielberg, Tony Kushner
Others:
Rick Carter, John Williams, Michelle Williams
Aka:
Untitled Steven Spielberg/Amblin Partners Project / Untitled Steven Spielberg Project
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
Children & Family, Drama
Collections:
Award Winners, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2023, Oscar Nominations Competition 2023, Top 10 Barnyard Bird Films, Top Films
BBFC:
Release Date:
05/05/2023
Run Time:
144 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 2.0, English Dolby Digital 2.0, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • 'The Fabelmans': A Personal Journey
BBFC:
Release Date:
05/06/2023
Run Time:
150 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • 'The Fabelmans': A Personal Journey
  • Family Dynamics
  • Crafting the World of 'The Fabelmans'
BBFC:
Release Date:
05/06/2023
Run Time:
150 minutes
Languages:
Canadian French Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby TrueHD 7.1, Latin American Spanish Dolby TrueHD 7.1
Subtitles:
Canadian French, English Hard of Hearing, Latin American Spanish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • 'The Fabelmans': A Personal Journey
  • Family Dynamics
  • Crafting the World of 'The Fabelmans'

More like The Fabelmans

Reviews (8) of The Fabelmans

More self-celebration than self-interrogation - The Fabelmans review by PD

Spoiler Alert
19/06/2023

This coming-of-age story centres on Sammy Fabelman (Gabriel LaBelle), who becomes entranced by the spectacle of a train crash onscreen when his parents – Mitzi (Michelle Williams) and Burt (Paul Dano) – take him to watch Cecil B. DeMille’s The Greatest Show on Earth, thus introducing him to cinema’s profoundly magical illusion of immortality. Sammy is inevitably a boyhood avatar for Spielberg’s own love affair with film, and in many ways the first half-hour is the most effective as we watch Sammy reaching towards his dreams. Unfortunately much of the rest of the action is characterised by a determination to smash the audience over the head with every dramatic note, the dialogue much too obvious and the plot points too emphatic, thus violating the golden rule of “show, don’t tell”.

As you'd expect, much of the film's finer moments involve the power of film, but the dramatic range of the narrative – family issues, racial discrimination, creative ambitions, romantic frustrations, adolescent friendships as well as the joys and pains of growing up – only serves to weaken the central theme rather than enhance it. And in its all-too obvious attempt to produce a heartwarming crowd-pleaser these themes themselves fall rather flat. There's an annoying sentimentality throughout, and it's curious that the director doesn’t seem to have the heart to extend his parents beyond archetypes: Burt is smart and safe, Mitzi frustrated and impetuous; despite the director's intent not to romanticise his family, the film still ends up being frustratingly more self-celebration than self-interrogation. All in all, watchable enough but rather too light and fluffy for my taste.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Undemanding family drama - The Fabelmans review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
17/06/2023

You’d hope a film directed by and based on Steven Spielberg’s early life would be full of wonder and insight about cinema, but those moments are few and far between. It’s mostly a bland family drama that takes a whole hour (out of an overlong 2½ hours) to get going. After that there’s some heartfelt drama among family members at last and a couple of telling cameos from Judd Hirsch as a black-sheep uncle and David Lynch as John Ford. Otherwise it’s little more than a vanity project with little flourish and disappointingly meh.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Gave up watching after 40 minutes - The Fabelmans review by PK

Spoiler Alert
06/10/2023

I rarely give up watching movies even if I’m not enjoying them but this was so lifeless and boring to me, very stylised and well acted but I just couldn’t get into it.

If I made a movie about my own dull life it would probably be more exciting than the first forty minutes of this. 

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The Fabelmans (aka Untitled Steven Spielberg/Amblin Partners Project / Untitled Steven Spielberg Project) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Steven Spielberg delivers what is easily his most personal and fascinating film in many years with The Fabelmans. The semi-autobiographical family drama depicts a young filmmaker growing up in the mid-20th century, trying to find his calling and maintain a connection with his parents. What follows is a surprisingly sweet and stern story of the conflict between art and family.

The Spielberg stand-in is Sammy (Mateo Zoryon Francis-DeFord), a boy who we first see dazzled by his first movie in a 1950s theater. With his first film being The Greatest Show on Earth, the thrilling train disaster sequence becomes a memorable moment that he desires to recreate. His obsession gains mixed reactions from his seemingly loving family. His mother Mitzi (Michelle Williams) has a love of art that makes him push Sammy’s filmmaking dreams forward. His father Burt (Paul Dano) is much more scientific and would rather Sammy’s filmmaking be more of a hobby than a passion. His younger sisters are just kinda there, providing passive commentary on the situation.

Sammy soon grows into a teenager (Gabriel LaBelle) and his filmmaking becomes much more innovative and intricate. He finds himself fascinated by the more advanced cameras and editing devices, compelled to upgrade his tech as much as his ambitions. It’s inspiring to watch the creative teen perfect his craft, finding ways to make Westerns feel more authentic and war films pack more emotion. Despite how corny it might be to watch him form these eureka moments, there is a lot of charm to his artistic progression.

Thankfully, the film isn’t all about filmmaking. Most of the narrative centers around the deteriorating relationship between Mitzi and Burt, where Burt’s friend Bernie (Seth Rogen) becomes more romantic with Mitzi. Mitzi’s mental health takes a dip with all the moving for Burt’s bigger jobs and she becomes desperate for outlets. Burt, more focused on the progress of electronics, finds himself unable to accommodate the conflicted feelings of his wife. While they both love each other and their children, there are only so long they can keep trying to show kindness amid their frustrations, where it’s more enduring to watch this family carry on than stay together.

There are a lot of great scenes in the film but the best one is undoubtedly the moment when Sammy gets a visit from his grandfather Boris (Judd Hirsch). While Sammy is initially amazed by Boris’s secret life as a performer, he becomes conflicted about the artistic route when Boris speaks more boldly about how creative endeavors can be taxing on relationships with family, forcing you to choose one over the other. It’s a fascinating crossroads for Sammy and presents a stern bluntness that transcends the nostalgia.

I guess that’s what makes The Fabelman’s so beautiful is that it’s rather sobering. Sammy’s family life is filled with plenty of quirks but also problems that are not so easy to resolve or come to terms with. That being said, there’s also some brilliant meta-humor that comes about as the film progresses. This comes in the form of how Sammy addresses a bully he threatens the filmmaker to never make a movie about him and later Sammy gets some valuable advice from one of his idols. I won’t spoil who is playing this role but suffice to say it’s one of the biggest surprises and satisfying ways to end the film.

Spielberg’s filmography spans so long that it’s great to see him make a film like The Fabelmans, tapping into something closer to his heart and observing something he’s become an expert at. That might seem like an easy bar to cross for an aged director but this has kinda been Spielberg’s whole deal. Even though he hasn’t had an astounding film since Lincoln, his movies always carry some sense of brilliance that showcases why he’s such a master of the art. The Fabelmans is just a reminder of how his powerful filmmaking can extend into the realm of melodrama and semi-biopics, making for one of his most notable works in his twilight years.

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