Rent The Banshees of Inisherin (2022)

3.7 of 5 from 569 ratings
1h 50min
Rent The Banshees of Inisherin Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
From writer-director Martin McDonagh (Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri) comes a unique film starring Colin Farrell and Brendan Gleeson. Although Padraic (Farrell) and CoIm (Gleeson) have been lifelong friends, they find themselves at an impasse when one abruptly ends their relationship, bringing alarming consequences for both of them.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , John Carty, Oliver Farrelly, Lasaírfhiona Ní Chonaola, James Carty, Conor Connolly, , , Morse,
Directors:
Producers:
Graham Broadbent, Peter Czernin, Martin Mcdonagh
Writers:
Martin Mcdonagh
Others:
Colin Farrell, Carter Burwell, Pete Czernin, Colin Farrell, Mikkel E. G. Nielsen, Mikkel E.G. Nielsen
Studio:
Buena Vista Disney
Genres:
Comedy, Drama
Collections:
10 Films to Watch if You Like: EO, Award Winners, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2023, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2024, Films to Watch If You Like..., Ireland At the Oscars, Oscar Nominations Competition 2023
Awards:

2023 BAFTA Best British Film

2023 BAFTA Best Original Screen Play

2023 BAFTA Best Supporting Actress

2023 BAFTA Best Supporting Actor

BBFC:
Release Date:
30/01/2023
Run Time:
110 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 2.0, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 0 (All)
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
30/01/2023
Run Time:
114 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 2.0, English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All
Bonus:
  • Creating 'The Banshees of Inisherin'
  • Deleted Scenes

More like The Banshees of Inisherin

Found in these customers lists

Reviews (13) of The Banshees of Inisherin

Massively Clever Dark Comedy - The Banshees of Inisherin review by GI

Spoiler Alert
30/10/2022

Director Martin McDonagh's contemplative black comedy about male loneliness, depression and inability to deal with emotional issues. It's a remarkably well written film and has all round faultless performances. Set on a small island off the Irish coast in 1923 as the Civil War rages on the mainland (an allegory you'll get as the film progresses including the islanders reactions to the sound of gunfire they occasionally can hear) Colin Farrell is Pádraic, a good natured but simple chap who lives with his unmarried sister, Siobhan (Kerry Condon). His best friend is Colm (Brendan Gleeson), a more thoughtful yet depressive man, until one day Colm tells Pádraic he no longer wants to be friends and bans him from speaking to him. This revelation causes Pádraic no end of angst and he makes repeated efforts to find out why until Colm threatens shocking consequences if he persists in talking to him. Pádraic confides his feelings to Dominic (Barry Keoghan), the young son of the local police constable, who appears to be a dimwit but he proves wiser than initially thought. The breakdown in this 'bromance' has ripple effects on all the characters and often in some extreme ways. It's a clever film that deserves a couple of viewings to appreciate its subtleties. As a study of male toxicity, emotional immaturity and friendships it's a masterpiece and Farrell, Gleeson, Condon and Keoghan are all fantastic and deserve all the awards they can get.

6 out of 8 members found this review helpful.

Flip-side of Father Ted - The Banshees of Inisherin review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
25/02/2023

On a period backwater Irish island called Craggy Island (sorry, Insherin Island), the best friend of nice-but-dim Father Dougal (sorry, a different nice-but-dim man) stops talking to him. Why? That forms the basis of the first half of this film’s underwhelming plot. Then, like a flip side to “Father Ted”, something grotesque but unbelievably silly happens to inject some much-needed dramatic tension into affairs. Unfortunately, it’s not funny enough to be a black comedy and the plot has nowhere to go after that.

That’s not to say there’s nothing to enjoy here. There’s some spicy dialogue and Martin Mcdonagh is an accomplished director who knows how to frame and film a shot. He keeps you watching, but there’s just not enough of interest going on to warrant a near 2hr run-time. Eventually it just peters out. Vastly over-praised by reviewers who’ve invented all sorts of deep meaning lurking beneath the surface, this is best viewed as Oirish whimsy.

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Wasted on me - The Banshees of Inisherin review by JR

Spoiler Alert
23/02/2023

This film no doubt will appeal to some. However, I found it absolutely boring and unwatchable. Maybe I’m not intelligent enough to appreciate it, or trendy enough to say I do. I found it dismal, boring and totally unwatchable. 

3 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The Banshees of Inisherin review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

The Banshees of Inisherin is one of those comedies so blue that you nearly bring yourself to tears as you laugh. Somewhere between somber realization and defensive absurdity, this is a film all about dullness. The boredom of this 1920s Irish island community is a sensation that paints the community with darkly comedic recognition of being unable to handle mundanity. It's darkly comedic but also deeply relatable.

Among this community are Colm (Brendan Gleeson), a folk musician, and Pádraic (Colin Farrell), a plain rancher who lives with his sister Siobhán (Kerry Condon). Colm and Pádraic have a history as the best of friends, sharing a daily ritual of pints at the pub. One day, Colm doesn’t come to the pub. He informs Pádraic that he’s cutting off their friendship without any reason given. Pádraic can’t understand this. They’ve done the same thing every day for years. What’s changed?

Well, nothing has changed and that’s the problem. As Colm soon reveals, he’s grown weary with life and is having an existential moment, grappling with the prospect that he’ll leave nothing behind in this world. Desiring immortality, Colm aims to compose a brilliant piece of music and believes severing ties with Pádraic will help in this artistic endeavor. Pádraic, however, can’t understand this, hence why Colm was reluctant to confess his despair.

The friendship of these two friends is put to the ultimate test in a manner of dry humor and emotional distance. It’s easy to see a bit of yourself in both of these characters and their desperation to find some meaning in life. Sure, it’s easy to laugh at Pádraic for being so dim that he knows common French phrases or famous composers. Yet Pádraic also desires a routine and normalcy that throws his whole life out of balance when change threatens him. Colm may be easier to identify with in how he finds life meaningless and struggles to fight off dark thoughts through his art. At the same time, his irrationality in trying to push Pádraic away is as sad as it is hilarious.

Even the members of the community have a relatable and absurd charm to how they present themselves. With Colm distancing himself, Pádraic’s only other friend seems to be Dominic (Barry Keoghan), a young man who can’t stop thinking about sex and how hot he finds Pádraic’s sister, leading him to ask some rather uncomfortable questions. The local pub owner has his quirks of trying to keep his head low, the local police officer is pompously eager for violence, the local priest is highly protective, and the local shopkeep is a gossip hound who can never stop poking her noses in other people’s business. It’s a familiar community with common quirks and harsh critiques on how the simple life isn’t so simple.

Writer and director Martin McDonagh is skilled enough not just in creating strong dialogue but stunning sights. The way he shoots this Irish island is immaculate, giving a grand sense of scale and wonder. McDonagh’s mastery of drama is also rather stellar. At one point in the narrative, Colm threatens to cut off his fingers if Pádraic doesn’t leave him alone. He’s not kidding either. How many fingers are cut off? Well, it’s best to watch and see how far this desperation for contentment will go before these two characters harm themselves for the sake of finding happiness that seems miles away.

The Banshees of Inisherin showcase a mastery of existential dread and brilliant dark comedy, entrancing the viewer in a world so sad and dreary that you have to laugh. The performances are all top-notch though I doubt that’s a surprise for such talents as Farrell and Gleeson. This wonderfully sad film that I can’t stop thinking about and is easily one of the best films of 2022.

Unlimited films sent to your door, starting at £15.99 a month.