Rent Nope (2022)

3.2 of 5 from 523 ratings
2h 5min
Rent Nope (aka NOPE) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Following their father's shocking death, Hollywood animal wrangler OJ (Daniel Kaluuya) and his sister Emerald (Keke Palmer) begin observing unexplained phenomena on their vast Southern California ranch that leads them down an obsessive rabbit hole as they plot attempts to capture the mystery on camera. Along with a former child star turned family theme park ringmaster (Steven Yeun) who neighbours the siblings, the pair's efforts to chase the spectacle soon bring terrifying consequences and unimaginable horror. The result is a complex social thriller that unpacks the seeds of violence, risk and opportunism that are inseparable from the romanticised history of the American West...and from show business itself.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , Jacob Kim, , , , , , Roman Gross
Directors:
Producers:
Ian Cooper, Jordan Peele
Writers:
Jordan Peele
Aka:
NOPE
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
Horror, Sci-Fi & Fantasy, Thrillers
Collections:
Award Winners, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2023
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/11/2022
Run Time:
125 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English Dolby Digital 5.1, French Audio Description, French Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, French
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.20:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • And More!
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/11/2022
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English Dolby Atmos, French Audio Description, French Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, Italian Dolby Digital Plus 7.1
Subtitles:
Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, French, Italian
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.20:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Shadows: The Making of Nope - Jordan Peele, along with the cast and crew, takes you deep inside the making of 'Nope' with this revealing and immersive 55-minute exclusive look behind the scenes
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • And More!
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/11/2022
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Atmos, French Dolby Digital Plus 7.1, German Dolby Atmos
Subtitles:
Complex Mandarin, English Hard of Hearing, French, German
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.20:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Shadows: The Making of Nope - Jordan Peele, along with the cast and crew, takes you deep inside the making of 'Nope' with this revealing and immersive 55-minute exclusive look behind the scenes
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • And More!

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Reviews (10) of Nope

Disappointing nonsense - Nope review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
11/12/2022

After his two excellent and disturbing films Get Out and Us, Jordan Peele comes a serious cropper with his third, which he delusionally seems to think is ‘a flying saucer horror film’. As for the blurb about it being a ‘complex social thriller’, whoever wrote that must think the emperor wore clothes. Nope is simply laughably bad B-movie sci-fi of the kind that might have been made in the 50s. Even that would be okay if it wasn’t so boring.

Daniel Kaluuya (from Get Out) is a horse wrangler for Hollywood when strange things start happening on his backcountry ranch. For a while there are hopes the film may get as creepy as Peele’s first two, but instead it just gets sillier and sillier. Even worse, it remains mundane and tedious, with an undercooked screenplay and a rag-bag of characters that lack believability. Daniel’s character has little to do except stand around looking at the sky or sit on his horse, while his overactive sister is a real pain (even more so in the excruciating gag reel on the DVD).

If you stick with it, it will only be out of sheer bemusement as the 'flying saucer' and people’s reaction to it become ever more ridiculous. An unfortunate 1-star film with an extra star for some well-shot Western scenery.

6 out of 8 members found this review helpful.

very slow - Nope review by am

Spoiler Alert
19/01/2023

Was looking forward to this movie but was soo slow and had to force myself to sit through it. I don't know why but I could not understand what they were saying, they kept mumbling. I don't know if this was on purpose but made an already painful experience even worse.

6 out of 8 members found this review helpful.

Baffling SciFi/Horror - Nope review by GI

Spoiler Alert
28/01/2023

This is intriguing, baffling and confusing film where half the time you'll be wondering what the hell us going on. I certainly think that's director Jordan Peele's intention the end result of which will divide audiences. I'm left uncertain as to what I really feel about this film a hybrid of horror and science fiction with influences of Close Encounters of The Third Kind (1977), Alien (1979) and Jaws (1975) and the story telling style of John Carpenter. OJ (Daniel Kaluuya) and his sister, Emerald (Keke Palmer) run a horse ranch specialising in training horses for the movie industry. When objects such as coins and keys begin mysteriously falling from the sky, one of which kills their father (Keith David), strange events begin including sightings of a cloud that never moves and glimpses of a UFO. This is definitely a film to watch with little advanced warning of the story so I'll refrain from elaborating further suffice to say that there are frustratingly unexplained scenes including the prologue which, to me, seems to be laying the ground for a theme about the nature of mans relationship with other creatures. I think Peele has made a film full of his self indulgences and it may become a firm cult favourite in time but it doesn't have the unique feel that Get Out (2017) had as it's just a little too quirky and unsatisfying.

5 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Nope (aka NOPE) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Jordan Peele’s Nope continues the director’s devotion to surreal social horror. There’s grander ambition placed in this film that mixes so much together. It swirls together genres of horror, science fiction, and westerns into quite the picture. It also taps into a sense of control and perception, where the big monster of this film is literally a giant eye that needs to be both entertained and fed. In terms of a film trying to turn the mirror on the audience, Peele’s picture finds far more than munching aliens to appease the public with an already high standard for his chilling works.

The mystery builds spectacularly through this narrative. Daniel Kaluuya plays OJ Haywood, the owner of a historic ranch for Hollywood horses. He inherits the ranch after his father who dies in a manner that seems odd. The freak accident haunts him, hoping there was some better reason for such a loss of life. OJ is a reserved individual, far different from his top client of former child actor Ricky (Steven Yeun) and his eccentric/accidental sister Emerald (Keke Palmer). While others find themselves distracted by the allure of Westerns for their desert region, OJ tries to keep his focus on maintaining the ranch.

Or at least he tries to before becoming distracted by something far bigger. When the horses of the ranch go missing, he happens upon a UFO. Emerald believes him, as does a bored electronics employee, Angel (Brandon Perea). All of their team up to capture footage of this mysterious alien ship. But they may not be ready for what they discover. Perhaps it’s not even a ship but a mysterious organic being. Perhaps it’s also hungry.

Compared to Peele’s other films, there’s certainly a subdued nature to Nope. There’s a slower build-up to the inevitable moments of violence and terror that such a film guarantees. There’s a reason the marketing has been so coy for such a picture. It’s that peeling back of the layers that reveal something more. It also helps flesh out the characters enough so that we care about whether or not they get munched on by aliens. Everybody performs admirably but Kaluuya and Palmer have such amazing chemistry. I loved how Kaluuya is restrained and dead-pan while Palmer is brimming with enthusiasm.

The commentary within Nope is wonderfully meta for harping on both audiences and control. There’s a desire to tame the wild, to force creatures to not only bend to our whim but do our bidding. This becomes most apparent when divulging the pasts of the characters and having a firm focus on the nature of the camera’s capturing the soul. It's a premise that is not only strong enough to be thoughtful but playful enough for great humor. This leads to the perfect opportunity for such a film to live up to its title and use its refusal to play with the horror at just the right moment.

Nope is so brilliant for being a surreal tapestry of questioning our own desires. It’s by far Peele’s highest concept to date with some of the most amazing cinematography. It plays around with so many genres and conventions that there’s rarely a dull moment as the mystery unfolds. Despite seeming so epic, the film still manages to house the pitch-perfect comedy and believable behavior that makes Peele’s films so effortless with character and comedy. The allegory never becomes so blunt that the audience grasps it immediately nor do the ideas grow so heavy that you can’t appreciate the scene of Keke Palmer doing the AKIRA motorcycle slide. What a fantastic picture and another example of how Peele continues to be a stellar horror director, making me all the more excited for his next production.

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