Rent 120 BPM (Beats Per Minute) (2017)

3.7 of 5 from 242 ratings
2h 17min
Rent 120 BPM (Beats Per Minute) (aka 120 BPM / BPM (Beats Per Minute) / 120 battements par minute) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
As the AIDS epidemic tears through their community, the members of ACT UP Paris are fighting for survival. One day, as outspoken radical Sean (Nahuel Perez Biscayart) strikes up a conversation with shy newcomer Nathan (Arnaud Valois), they have no idea that their lives are about to change forever. From the writer of Palme d'Or winner 'The Class', Robin Campillo, and based on his own experiences, this vibrant and deeply emotional drama rushes with youthful energy, balancing powerful themes of social justice with euphoric moments of spine-tingling sensuality. Urgent and effecting, it's a film about life, death, passion, tragedy - and, above all, the will to survive.
Actors:
, , , , , Ariel Borenstein, , Simon Bourgade, , , , , Théophile Ray, , , , Julien Herbin, , Bachir Saïfi,
Directors:
Producers:
Hugues Charbonneau, Marie-Ange Luciani
Writers:
Robin Campillo, Philippe Mangeot
Aka:
120 BPM / BPM (Beats Per Minute) / 120 battements par minute
Studio:
Curzon / Artificial Eye
Genres:
Drama, Lesbian & Gay
Countries:
France, Top 100 Films, Drama, Lesbian & Gay
Awards:

2017 Cannes Grand Prize

BBFC:
Release Date:
04/06/2018
Run Time:
137 minutes
Languages:
French, French Audio Description
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Cheerleading Rehearsal
  • Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
04/06/2018
Run Time:
142 minutes
Languages:
French, French Audio Description
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Cheerleading Rehearsal
  • Trailer

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Reviews (3) of 120 BPM (Beats Per Minute)

Tour de force - 120 BPM (Beats Per Minute) review by GD

Spoiler Alert
03/08/2018

From the political to the personal all aspects of the appalling treatment of aids and its consequences are movingly portrayed. Courage, anger, humour, love, passion, indifference and bewilderment are all here and all expertly communicated by a young cast. From the brilliant portrayal of activist meetings through the set piece demonstrations to the heart rending portrayal of personal loss we were totally engrossed.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Different Aspect of the Initial Response to AIDS - 120 BPM (Beats Per Minute) review by KW

Spoiler Alert
25/08/2018

Fascinating film covering the initial responses to the AIDS epidemic in Paris and how the community got together to fight the system to get answers, expose issues, make people be aware of what was going on and at the same time explore the relationships, friendships that developed through it. Having lived through the period I found it very thought provoking, opened my eyes to issues that I was not fully aware off and how a community came together to fight the cause! If the period interests you a film not to be missed.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

How Times Have Changed - 120 BPM (Beats Per Minute) review by AA

Spoiler Alert
21/01/2020

from the time of this film when AIDS was seen as a scourge and people were ostracised for having the illness and action groups were having to fight officialdom to get any help etc from them for those so unfortunate to have the illness.  In the changed times of today it was good to be reminded of what people had to fight for to get to where we are today!

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

120 BPM (Beats Per Minute) (aka 120 BPM / BPM (Beats Per Minute) / 120 battements par minute) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

It’d be far too easy to reap easy tears and melodrama from the protests of ACT UP in Paris of the gay community against the restrictive and demonizing government response of the AIDS epidemic. But here is a film that doesn’t aim so low with its story of the uphill battle in the 1990s. It doesn’t give us a mushy sensation of hope for the future but embodies us within the dire scenario, evoking all the pain and passion for the plight of the gay community being treated as second-class citizens.

The various ACT UP members are given a genuine personality that erupts with great fury. We meet them at ACT UP meetings of classrooms, a forum where the many affected bicker and banter about what to do next as the clock is ticking for many of them. Then there are the more quiet and sexual scenes between the gay men of the group, paid with close attention and ample focus in the hazy darkness of concealing their love. These two tones of the ACT UP group presents more three-dimensional characters than merely civil right crusaders of traits more heroically wrapped in ambition rather than bound by troubling lives. Such lives are hard to maintain as you watch your friends and lover perish around you, with the world seeming to care little for your situation.

Thibault (Antoine Reinartz) is presented as the leader of ACT UP, staging their protests and struggling to maintain common ground in a group that seems to not only disagree on their tactics but feud about smoking during meetings. Sophie (Adèle Haenel) tries to bring new ideas into the mix. Max (Félix Maritaud) takes the lead on concocting props for protests, including fake blood. Sean (Nahuel Pérez Biscayart) finds himself full of ideas as well as a love for the newest member of the group, Nathan (Arnaud Valois). Romance blooms with aspects of eroticism, drama, and tragedy as two souls fight to maintain love in a society that would rather such affection be shut out.

Director Robin Campillo doesn’t want to shut out any of this story, keeping in every challenging and heartbreaking aspect. We don’t just hear about characters dying off-screen; we watch them slowly drift away in situations that linger long after, haunting the viewer with how one could continue living when so many forces seem to be against you. We just don’t hear of the gay romances taking place behind closed doors; we follow them in and watch that sexuality take hold and form a bond in the ambiance of revolution and a desire to fight on another day. The relationship between Sean and Nathan is anything but simple, showcasing a complicated series of feelings that leads to distrust and questioning of just how far they’re willing to take this romance.

120 BPM runs exceptionally long at 140 minutes but warrants every minute as we keep our eyes and ears fixated on the struggling. We get to know and love these characters as relatable people all the more to see just how much Big Pharma and the government has damaged their lives. If we only took heed, we could see people and not just some othering by the homophobic and stuffy suits who chose to ignore a real problem. Maybe we haven’t come very far since, but this film lets us know that the protesters were not just angry young people protesting for the sake of protesting. They had cause for anger and concern in a society that would rather tone police than listen. Perhaps we will listen after the fact, one hopes.

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