Rent Manchester by the Sea (2016)

3.6 of 5 from 983 ratings
2h 11min
Rent Manchester by the Sea Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
In an Academy Award, BAFTA and Golden Globe winning performance, Casey Affleck stars as Lee, a man whose spare existence is suddenly ruptured when the death of his brother Joe (Kyle Chandler) forces him to return to the hometown he abandoned years before. Rocked by contact with his estranged ex-wife (Michelle Williams) and the revelation that Joe has made him guardian of his teenage son (Lucas Hedges), Lee is forced to face up to painful memories and newfound levels of responsibility as he reconnects with his family. Kenneth Lonergan's critically acclaimed masterpiece is an extraordinary journey of grief, love and wit that will stay with you long after watching.
Actors:
, , , , , Virginia Loring Cooke, , , , , Mary Mallen, , , , , , , , , Chloe Dixon
Directors:
Producers:
Lauren Beck, Matt Damon, Chris Moore, Kimberly Steward, Kevin J. Walsh
Writers:
Kenneth Lonergan
Others:
Matt Damon, Andrew Garfield, Chris Moore, Kevin J. Walsh, Jennifer Lame, Lauren Beck, Kimberly Steward
Studio:
StudioCanal
Genres:
Top 100 Films, Drama
Awards:

2017 BAFTA Best Actor

2017 BAFTA Best Original Screen Play

2017 Oscar Best Actor

2017 Oscar Best Original Screen Play

BBFC:
Release Date:
15/05/2017
Run Time:
131 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Director's Commentary
  • Deleted Scenes
  • 'Emotional Lives' Featurette
BBFC:
Release Date:
15/05/2017
Run Time:
137 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Director's Commentary
  • Deleted Scenes
  • 'Emotional Lives' Featurette

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Reviews (34) of Manchester by the Sea

Go see - Manchester by the Sea review by BE

Spoiler Alert

A slow and well crafted movie, albeit quite a long sit. I felt Lucas Hedges' acting was on a par with that of the Oscar winning performance given by Casey Affleck. It also came to mind that had James Dean been alive and in his youth, he would have also been ideal for the role of the bereaved brother. As well as the obligatory angst, he would have brought more of a sense of endearment to the role. Nevertheless, it was two and a quarter hours well spent. It stayed with me well after I had left it behind, so to speak.

5 out of 7 members found this review helpful.

Different - Manchester by the Sea review by ET

Spoiler Alert

Main character a bit moody so not so realistic but story could happen to anyone. Overall nice not to have guns, fighting and conspiracies etc.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Dialogue - Manchester by the Sea review by JT

Spoiler Alert

Possibly a great worthy film but we struggled with the main character (Casey) who mumbled throughout. Subtitles would have been useful but did not work. Quite a shame.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Manchester by the Sea review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Manchester by the Sea is an aftermath picture, following relatable characters and how they try to live in the wake of deaths. It is a sometimes awkward, sometimes funny, sometimes depressingly sad story, about as human as any tale of mourning can be. And rather than focus on creating tighter moments of drama, the movie instead focuses on the more difficult and uncomfortable aspects of handling the passing of loved ones. Life goes on, just a little differently and a little more scary.

Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck) is presented as a quiet, flawed and simple man, working the lonely and often thankless job of an apartment handyman. Some tenants fancy him while other go on the offensive, leaving to passive aggressively respond to their complaints. The nights that are not spent watching the game in his quaint studio apartment are spent in bars where he will occasionally start a fight. His dreary routine is soon interrupted to discover his brother Joe (Kyle Chandler) has passed away in Manchester. He arrives to examine the body, makes the tearful confirmation and begins the long and painful process of funeral arrangements. While spending time in Manchester to handle the funeral, he’s also tasked with looking after his teenage nephew Patrick (Lucas Hedges) and eventually learns from the will that he’s the new guardian.

This scenario could have easily turned into a soapy drama where Lee tries to understand being a parent of a depressed kid, but the script thankfully never goes for such easy drama. Lee has known Patrick since he was a boy so their relationship doesn’t require much cultivation. Patrick doesn’t appear to require a whole lot of maintenance either as the day of his father’s death finds him trying to spend the evening with friends and pizza at home as Lee stays out of their way. It’s not until the discussion what to do with Kyle’s body does their conversation turn a little more heated, only reaching a maximum level of frustration when deciding on where to live.

Through a series of flashbacks, we learn why Lee left Manchester to begin with and why he is so eager to leave it behind. It is slowly revealed that he made a grave mistake with his family that is probably the most disheartening and worst situation for a man who wasn’t quite all there. It’s a mistake that will cut deep for any parent, leading to the question if you could live with yourself after such an event. Many will not understand how Lee could live in the aftermath and the character himself probably has similar thoughts where suicide was not out of the question.

Casey Affleck perfectly plays this tortured character that slowly begins to accept the comfy lifestyle of a family once more. He has a natural presence with his silence and mumbling that never feels overdone for a loner. The scene where has to identify a body at the morgue features him in a rare moment of tears which was not written into the original script. Lucas Hedges isn’t too shabby either as teenager who has conflicting views on his father and Lee, only really becoming emotional over the fate of the boat where all three of them connected. Director Kenneth Lonergan has an expert eye for shooting the cold neighborhood of Manchester, focusing on the black nights, snowy lawns and cozy interiors. He knows how to give this town as much character as his leads, holding just long enough to appreciate the world before moving on to the next step towards a funeral.

Despite being over two hours, Manchester by the Sea never feels overblown, excessive or slow. It’s a very easy-going movie where tears only come where they’re most needed and light smiles come unexpectedly in the most awkward of situations. Scenes can go anywhere from Kyle tearfully breaking down over realizing his dad’s body has yet to buried to an embarrassingly amusing scene where Lee breaks down his door to make sure he’s okay. The film might be a tough sell for being so somber and relatable, but it’s refreshing at times to see a movie where characters feel real, human and filled with complexity.

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