Rent Get Out (2017)

3.8 of 5 from 1353 ratings
1h 40min
Rent Get Out Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
When Chris (Daniel Kaluuya), a young African-American man, visits his white girlfriend's (Allison Williams) family estate, he becomes ensnared in the more sinister, real reason for the invitation. At first, Chris reads the family's overly accommodating behaviour as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter's interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he could have never imagined.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , Caren L. Larkey, , , , Yasuhiko Oyama, , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Jordan Peele, Jason Blum, Edward H. Hamm Jr., Sean McKittrick
Writers:
Jordan Peele
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
Top 100 Films, Horror, Thrillers
Awards:

2018 Oscar Best Original Screen Play

BBFC:
Release Date:
24/07/2017
Run Time:
100 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, French, German
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, German, Hindi, Icelandic, Norwegian, Portuguese, Swedish, Turkish
Bonus:
  • Alternate Ending and Deleted Scenes with Commentary by Writer/Director Jordan Peele
  • Unveiling the Horror of 'Get Out'
  • Q&A Discussion with Jordan Peele and the Cast
  • Feature Commentary
BBFC:
Release Date:
24/07/2017
Run Time:
104 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, French, German, Italian, Spanish
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, German, Hindi, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish
Bonus:
  • Alternate Ending and Deleted Scenes with Commentary by Writer/Director Jordan Peele
  • Unveiling the Horror of 'Get Out'
  • Q&A Discussion with Jordan Peele and the Cast
  • Feature Commentary
BBFC:
Release Date:
18/09/2017
Run Time:
104 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, French
Subtitles:
Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Norwegian, Swedish

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Reviews (28) of Get Out

Great horror movie - Get Out review by EO

Spoiler Alert

This is an ingenious horror story,which looks at racial stereotype s .The tension is ratched up.At times,it is funny.It subverts gender stereotype s,the male character as the victim.. Original

3 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Clever modern horror movie - even without the racial angle - Get Out review by PV

Spoiler Alert

Much has been made of the race issue in this movie - but honestly, this film could have been made with an entire white cast and still be effective. In fact, the whole race thing seems tagged on. Because as one character in the film says: 'black is fashionable'. The movie has nothing to do with gender (plenty of male victims in horror films throughout the 20th century!)

Well-written, filmed and acted, though utter hokum from start to finish - and an unnecessary subplot re a deer. Sometimes just TOO much sub-Twilight-Zone hokum for my tastes because I became unwilling to suspend disbelief - it's so OTT it would read like a story written by a 14 year old boy if written down.

Couldn't believe in these people or characters really at the end of the day - and THAT would have made it all so much more scary.

It's like The Stepford Wives meets Roots meets Psycho maybe. Watchable nonsense!

Ultimately, it's quite funny - like so many horror movies.

The ending surprised me - I think the one I was expecting would have been better.

4 stars.

5 out of 8 members found this review helpful.

Bit of a Disappointment - Get Out review by nm

Spoiler Alert

This film was very hyped and at the time was sorry to have missed it in the cinema. Having now watched it I can say that I am please I did miss it in the cinema. It's not a bad film and there is tension and an under lying sense of evil but I just thought the racial thing was un-needed. The acting was fine and a little bit of humour is thrown in for good measure. It was an ok movie and better than many others of its genre.

1 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Get Out review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Jordan Peele’s Get Out is such a strange and sensational thriller that challenges as much with its social satire as it does with its truly terrifying story. With its initial premise of a black man coming to visit the family of his white girlfriend, there’s a racial tension in the air, but not an obvious one. Her parents are not racist in the traditional sense of hating black people. They’re on the other end of the spectrum where they’re inviting of black people and adore them with an ignorant fascination. They love them so much that they have a sinister plan for them.

While this uneasy tension leads the movie into a Twilight Zone style story of sorts, it begins with a relatable situation. Photographer Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) is a little uneasy to be visiting with this family, but seems to take it in stride much easier than his girlfriend Rose (Allison Williams). She assures him that her family is more embarrassing than racist, stating that her father will try to show off by confessing he voted for Obama twice. A family reunion that takes place at her house the same weekend and it’s just as uncomfortable as expected. Her family fawns over his uniqueness as a black man at a very white gathering, viewing him more as a unique specimen than a human being. It’s even more uncomfortable that her family has endured black servants that don’t appear to be themselves. Something weird is going on here, but it’s something Chris doesn’t see coming for how strange and frightening it turns out to be.

Without giving too much away in this thriller with a twist (and what a twist it is), Get Out is a movie that takes a satirically aware eye to the new breed of racism, but also focuses on a loss of individuality. None of the character in this story feel comfortable with which they are, mostly from a perspective of race. Chris tries to shrug off Allison’s ignorantly progressive family, but still feels very out of place at a home filled with white people. There is a black person in Allison’s extended family, but he seems so distant from what Chris perceives to be black. Allison’s family shares an admiration of black people so strongly they feel ashamed of not only the racism associated with their race, but for being white in general. The only person Chris seems to connect with at the reunion is a blind photographer (Stephen Root) that shares Chris’ passion, but hates that he can no longer see photos. Everyone seems to be somebody that hates who they are in some capacity, believing that either society or life has cheated them in some way. The villains of this picture are the ones that want to find the easy answer, despite a not so easy or even believable procedure.

The film echoes the likes of Hitchcock, but still feels genuinely fresh in its approach that never settle on a simplistic tone. One can’t help but think of Rear Window when Chris uses his camera to spy on members of the family to figure out what they’re up to. However, it’s a technique that’s used brilliantly as the use of the camera acts as more than just a framing device for unique shots. There are a few jump scares, but none of them are fakeouts. There’s genuine terror on screen as Chris slowly peels back the layers of Allison’s strange family.

What’s most surprising about the picture is how funny it is for evoking comedy directly out of the situation. Chris keeps in contact with his TSA friend who continuously warns him that the family is planning on turning black people into sex slaves. It’s hilarious that he’d suggest such a possibility, but even more amusing for how he believes it to be true and how he’s not too far off from the truth. The awkwardness of Chris’ conversation with the seemingly well-meaning parents breeds laughs of unease for situations that are both believable and cringe-worthy. It creates an atmosphere that is very believable that by the time the weirdness of the sinister plot is revealed, it’s both shocking and fitting.

This is a film that’s destined to go down as a cult hit for being both a telling snapshot of the era and a freaky thriller in the vain of They Live. It works on so many levels: a warning sign for the swinging pendulum towards progressive racists, the heated relations between races, a campy situation thriller premise and a truly scary scenario of rejecting individuality. The film walks a fine line between comedy and terror, evoking the right amount of satire and unease from a frightening scenario. In this current age, a progressive trying to be more hip with black people is more terrifying than a masked maniac wielding a knife. You can laugh at that sentence, but it’s hard to deny there’s truth in such a premise.

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