Rent Funeral Parade of Roses (1969)

3.5 of 5 from 86 ratings
1h 45min
Rent Funeral Parade of Roses (aka Bara No Sôretsu) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
A feverish collision of avant-garde aesthetics and grindhouse shocks 'Funeral Parade of Roses' takes us on an electrifying journey into the nether-regions of the late-'60's Tokyo underworld. In Matsumoto's controversial debut feature, seemingly nothing is taboo: neither the incorporation of visual flourishes straight from the worlds of contemporary graphic-design, painting, comic-books, and animation; nor the unflinching depiction of nudity, sex, drug-use, and public-toilets. But of all the "transgressions" here on display, perhaps one in particular stands out the most: the film's groundbreaking and unapologetic portrayal of Japanese gay subculture.
Cross-dressing club-kid Eddie (Pîtâ) vies with a rival drag-queen (Osamu Ogasawara) for the favours of drug-dealing cabaret-manager Gonda Passions escalate and blood begins to flow - before all tensions are released in a jolting climax.
Actors:
, Osamu Ogasawara, Yoshimi Jô, Koichi Nakamura, Flamenco Umeji, Saako Oota, Tarô Manji, Toyosaburo Uchiyama, Mikio Shibayama, Wataru Hikonagi, Fuchisumi Gomi, Chieko Kobayashi, Yô Satô, Keiichi Takenaga, Mamoru Hirata, Nagatoshi Sakamoto, Kazuhiko Kura, , , Yutaka Oyama
Directors:
Producers:
Mitsuru Kudo, Keiko Machida
Writers:
Toshio Matsumoto
Aka:
Bara No Sôretsu
Studio:
Eureka
Genres:
Classics, Documentary, Drama, Lesbian & Gay
Countries:
Japan, Classics, Documentary, Drama, Lesbian & Gay
BBFC:
Release Date:
24/07/2006
Run Time:
105 minutes
Languages:
Japanese
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
B & W
Bonus:
  • New director-approved transfer from the director's personal print
  • Full length audio commentary by the director Toshio Matsumoto
  • Video interview with director Toshio Matsumoto
  • Promotional material gallery and original Japanese trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
18/05/2020
Run Time:
105 minutes
Languages:
Japanese LPCM Mono
Subtitles:
English
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.37:1
Colour:
B & W
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Feature-length commentary by Chris D, punk poet, singer, actor, film historian and author of Outlaw Masters of Japanese Film
  • Original Japanese trailer (1969)
  • US theatrical trailer (2017)
  • Eight recently remastered avant garde shorts by Toshio Matsumoto made between 1961 and 1975 (105 mins total): Nishijin (1961), The Song of Stone (1963), Ecstasis (1969), Metastasis (1971), Expansion (1972), Mona Lisa (1973), Siki Soku Ze Ku (1975) and Atman (1975)
Disc 1:
This disc includes the main feature
Disc 2:
This disc includes special features

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Reviews (1) of Funeral Parade of Roses

Unique Snapshot of 60's Japan - Funeral Parade of Roses review by CP Customer

Spoiler Alert
07/04/2009

Funeral Parade of Roses is a vibrant melting pot of ideas with mixed results. Based initially on the premise of Sophocles play ‘Oedipus the King’, Matsumoto-san captures the changing mood of Tokyo and Japan. Traditional values are slowly changing; liberal views on everything from sex, drugs and consumerism are merging with the West. And in downtown Tokyo a bohemian scene is flourishing with gay nightclubs and Western pop music, which forms the main backdrop for the film. The final experience is very much a child of the 60’s, with flashbacks and iconic images going in tandem with hip tunes. Yet unlike many of the LSD films from the States around this time, Matsumoto-san uses the Oedipus blueprint as we slowly come to understand the troubles of the main characters. Being gay and hip in Tokyo may seem like a joyous life, but these are troubled characters with tarnished histories. Shinnosuke Ikehata (Eddie) is a revelation here, plucked from obscurity to take the lead in Funeral Parade of Roses. His performance is based on his own experiences, as until filming he worked the clubs before using the film as a springboard for a new career. As an actual film, Roses has too many issues and is badly paced, being hampered with too many 60’s flashbacks and waffle. It succeeds on another level, as a fascinating record of a Japanese era that the majority of us would have never considered existed beforehand.

3 out of 4 members found this review helpful.