Rent EO (2022)

3.4 of 5 from 177 ratings
1h 28min
Rent EO (aka Eo) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
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Synopsis:
EO, a grey donkey with melancholic eyes and a curious spirit, begins his life as a circus performer before escaping on a trek across the Polish and Italian countryside. During his travels, he encounters an eclectic cast of characters, including a countess, a young Italian priest and a riotous Polish football team. An equine hero, EO boldly points out societal ills and serves as warning of the dangers of neglect and inaction, all while on a quest for freedom.
Actors:
Hola, Tako, , Ettore, Rocco, Mela, , Tomasz Organek, , Lorenzo Zurzolo, , , Agata Sasinowska, , Michal Przybyslawski, Gloria Iradukunda, Piotr Szaja, , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Ewa Piaskowska, Jerzy Skolimowski
Writers:
Ewa Piaskowska, Jerzy Skolimowski
Aka:
Eo
Studio:
British Film Institute
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Drama
Collections:
10 Films to Watch if You Like: EO, Award Winners, Films to Watch If You Like..., Ireland At the Oscars
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/04/2023
Run Time:
88 minutes
Languages:
Italian Dolby Digital 2.0, Italian DTS 5.1, Polish Dolby Digital 2.0, Polish DTS 5.1
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Jerzy Skolimowski and Ewa Piaskowska on the making of EO (2022, 27 mins): director Jerzy Skolimowski and co-writer Ewa Piaskowska discuss the making of EO at the New York Film Festival
  • Skolimowski A to Ž (2023, 53 mins): an alphabetical journey through the work of Jerzy Skolimowski with writer Michael Brooke
  • High Rise Donkey (1980, 56 mins): in this Children's Film Foundation adventure, three children who live in a tower block try to save a donkey from small-time crooks
  • The Clown and His Donkey (1910, 4 mins): rare silhouette animation by Charles Armstrong depicting a clown doing tricks with his donkey
  • UK trailer and assorted teasers
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/04/2023
Run Time:
88 minutes
Languages:
Italian DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Italian LPCM Stereo, Polish DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Polish LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Jerzy Skolimowski and Ewa Piaskowska on the making of EO (2022, 27 mins): director Jerzy Skolimowski and co-writer Ewa Piaskowska discuss the making of EO at the New York Film Festival
  • Skolimowski A to Ž (2023, 53 mins): an alphabetical journey through the work of Jerzy Skolimowski with writer Michael Brooke
  • High Rise Donkey (1980, 56 mins): in this Children's Film Foundation adventure, three children who live in a tower block try to save a donkey from small-time crooks
  • The Clown and His Donkey (1910, 4 mins): rare silhouette animation by Charles Armstrong depicting a clown doing tricks with his donkey
  • UK trailer and assorted teasers

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Reviews (2) of EO

Sad film - beautifully shot - EO review by CD

Spoiler Alert
02/05/2023

I am not sure that the trailers really prepare the viewer for what is in store, which is quite sad and poignant. The photography is brilliant as is the way the focus is on the donkey's view of the world. The scenes are sufficiently strange to keep the film interesting. The lack of really developed human characters works well and keeps the sentimentality out of the film.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

I wish I could unsee this movie - EO review by MD

Spoiler Alert
01/10/2023

Thoroughly unpleasant. A donkey finds himself wondering around having horrible experiences. Gave up half way through. I thought this was going to be a nice animal movie.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

EO (aka Eo) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

EO joins a long line of avant-garde films about the world seen from the perspective of animals. This is not in the same vein as something like Milo & Otis or Planet Earth, where some human provides a voice for the animal. This picture is in the tradition of Au Hasard Balthazar by holding firm on an animal’s view and letting the world surrounding him paint a picture of humanity’s faults. That contemplative nature will not make EO an easy film for those unwilling to let the natural and free-flowing pacing unfold before them. However, those willing to watch and listen for this somber journey of one donkey may find it as profound as Balthazar.

EO is established as a circus donkey. We watch as he endures the lights and sounds of the circus-like a hazy dream, where the humans confuse him and the lights blind him. Around EO are people who love him and despise him. One man in the circus beats him while another feeds him. Animal rights protesters forced the circus to give up EO, and various people ushered the donkey around. He ends up on a ranch where children pet him. He becomes used as transportation for dead animals. He is hauled in a truck by a man who has his throat slit. He becomes the mascot of one football team and the punching bag of the opposition. He is nursed back to health but still forced into whatever path man has laid before him.

In addition to having a lot of slow moments of realism, there’s some surreality to how the donkey views the world. One of the most haunting sequences is when the donkey dreams of a world with a red sky and a towering windmill. Framed darkly and posed with extreme music, a strangeness to these moments drew my eyes more to what was possibly going through this donkey’s mind. As the film continues, it feels like we’re imposing the story within the donkey but that the donkey is writing his account of humanity’s ills. During one unique scene, EO kicks a man hauling dead animal bodies and decides to trot off. But trot off to wear? It’s a narrow path in front of him, one he cannot escape.

EO is an all-encompassing film in terms of how it wants to portray its world of small comforts and bitter cruelty. The donkey gets to experience every gentle touch, harsh beating, and limited freedom he is granted. It’s easy to show some love for this donkey simply by how cute he appears, but the film holds on to this character to question what the animal thinks of us. Stare long enough at the donkey, and you’ll see yourself in the mute eyes of darkness. With that inner awareness of the world, EO’s more extraordinary story takes hold of the viewer.

EO isn’t exactly a trailblazer in this regard, and it's tapping into some pretty common aspects of man’s relationship with animals present in similar meandering tales of non-human characters. It’s also not ideal for those who can’t understand a picture that doesn’t blast them with dialogue every minute. The film slowly washed over me, and I found myself greatly engrossed in what this film says about our world and what world we’re crafting for the animals we share it with. And in case there was any concern, don’t worry; no animals were harmed in making this film. Something to remember when you get to the scene of the donkey being beaten.

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