Rent Hidden Figures (2016)

4.0 of 5 from 1027 ratings
2h 1min
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Synopsis:
"Hidden Figures" tells the incredible untold story of Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson), Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monae) - brilliant African-American women working at NASA who served as the brains behind the launch into orbit of astronaut John Glenn (Glen Powell), a stunning achievement that turned around the Space Race. The visionary trio crossed all gender and racial lines and inspired generations.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Tre Stokes, Selah Kimbro Jones
Directors:
Producers:
Peter Chernin, Donna Gigliotti, Theodore Melfi, Jenno Topping, Pharrell Williams
Writers:
Allison Schroeder, Theodore Melfi, Margot Lee Shetterly
Studio:
20th Century Fox
Genres:
Top 100 Films, Drama
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/09/2017
Run Time:
121 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • No Limits - The Life of Katherine Johnson
  • Moving the Decimal - Honouring Katherine Johnson
  • Hidden Figures: Filming in Georgia
  • Stills Gallery
  • Audio Commentary by Director Theodore Melfi and Taraji P. Henson
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/09/2017
Run Time:
121 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • It All Adds Up: The Making of Hidden Figures: No Limits The Life of Katherine Johnson
  • The Right People for the Job
  • Recreating an Era - The Look of Hidden Figures
  • A Spiritual Journey - The Music of the Film
  • Moving the Decimal - Honouring Katherine Johnson
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Optional Deleted Scenes Commentary by Director Theodore Melfi
  • Filming in Georgia
  • Audio Commentary by Theodore Melfi and Taraji P. Henson
  • Stills Gallery
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/07/2017
Run Time:
121 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing

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Reviews (16) of Hidden Figures

Hidden clever ladies - Hidden Figures review by NC

Another little story from the past. Bit like all the Spitfires being delivered to airfields by ladies. Three very clever ladies. Well acted

1 out of 6 members found this review helpful.

Fiction promoted as fact = fake news. This is NOT a true story. - Hidden Figures review by PV

This film is watchable in a plodding predictable way and we all know the plot trajectory these days. Basically, someone (who is NEVER a white man) works somewhere and faces opposition because of their race and/or gender so get kept down (while utterly useless white males, yet the ones who invented everything and made space travel possible, are shown as racist and sexist monsters).

Of course, the female and/or black hero wins through in the end and everyone realises they're a total genius who has been kept down by racism and sexism.

All very well, but it's JUST NOT TRUE. It is a LIE to claim the US space programme only worked because of 3 genius black women - they were part of a data processing team, sure. They crunched numbers. Women still dominate data-input and processing staff in firms now. But really, if one is to tick boxes, one would see the vast majority of the team who achieved that were white males. The main white character here played by Kevin Costner is a composite of 3 white males.

There is a glaring gender issue here: for whatever reason (innate reasons are probably the main cause), 19 our of 20 people in the top 10% IQ band are male; university maths courses are 80%+ male, as are physics classes (why schools in a female-friendly male-unfriendly school system struggle to get maths and physics teachers - coz most are male and they've left teaching for better careers).

Hollywood can claim what it wants and rewrite history - as it did with ARGO and U571 and THE PATRIOT. Fine. But it's VERY dangerous because people esp kids believe this to be true history and it's not. It's inspired by the racist African-American movement that aims to claim people in history as 'our own' - so absurdly claim that black people invented cars, vacuum cleaners, lawnmovers, washing machines etc etc etc. The feminist industry does the same. Neither interest me - what interests me is the truth.

Rewriting the truth is WRONG - it's what the Communists did and what the Fascists did and what the Chinese and North Koreans do now.

The USA has its own race issues and movies like this are made to 1) assuage white American guilt; 2) pander to the present 'political correctness' in Hollywood.

But I don't see why I have to swallow the lies such movies spew out. Fine, make a movie about black women at NASA but DO NOT claim they invented the wheel and were geniuses or that all white men are and were racist sexist monsters. Because that is a lie. L.I.E.

Just one example: NASA in fact banned segregated toilets in 1958. Think of that FACT when you watch this FICTION which promotes the lies that these black women had to use black only toilets. They didn't! The film starts in 1961! The black women because NASA supervisors in 1948 and 1958 - at a time this movie claims blacks were little better than slaves and denied all promotion at NASA. No-one in the USA dares to speak out about the lies in this movie and those expressed elsewhere - to do so would be as dangerous as opposing communism in communist Russia. Now, THAT'S bullying.

Heart rules the (female) director's head here. For some facts read this: https://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/film-review-hidden-figures-takes-liberties-with-real-life-facts-1.66710

No stars.

8 out of 25 members found this review helpful.

Untold until now? - Hidden Figures review by JG

Emily Pankhurst started the suffragette movement which lead to the emancipation of women. Well they have a few more rights now, but the glass ceiling is still there. Just as the abolition of slavery has not lead to racial equality as it should have. This film touches on both these aspects and tells an important story. There are some women who are cleverer and more capable then most men, but men still get the top jobs. Very few who are not white make it to the top, with a few exceptions.

This tells the story of the computing unit, an office of women used for calculations before the advent of computers as a routine office tool. It shows how their work was vital in NASA' role in the conquest of space. It shows how women, particularly black women, were treated in the work place in the 50s. It also shows how NASA strove to improve things with Kevin Costner playing his part. I do not know if this is accurate; I am not American and I was busy trying to make my way in the world at the time, but I can believe it. The film ending credits give credence to the acceptance of these heroines, but why did it takes so long for this story to come out.

1 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Hidden Figures review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

The space race stories of NASA scientists Katherine Goble Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson went untold for decades until a few years ago. They proved to not only be trailblazers in their field during a tough time of racial discrimination in America, but also crucial to the success of NASA’s first manned space launch. This is a fascinating story that deserves to be known more widely in the areas of both history and science. And while this movie will make these historical figures more notable and inspirational for years to come, it does so with a movie that is more crowd-pleasing than crowd-informing.

I can’t exactly say I blame director Theodore Melfi for taking such a route, presenting a film that evenly touches on the racial issues, the hard science and the character dynamic. The leading ladies of Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monáe do an admirable job of portraying Katherine, Dorothy and Mary respectively. They play off each other well that it’s a shame we don’t see more scenes with them together outside of driving to work together or attending a church function. The three of them work in entirely different fields at NASA, leading me to believe they had even less interaction in real life than they do in this film. I almost wish the movie would have lied some more so we could see some of this trio playing off one another.

The arc focused on most heavily is Katherine’s as a mathematician that proved her worth and then some to her tough-but-fair department director Al Harrison (Kevin Costner). She has enough smarts to calculate the toughest of equations, even under the down-lookers of her uneasy co-workers not comfortable with a black woman in their bullpen. It’s still a challenge though, especially when the only bathroom for colored people is a mile away. Of course, Costner must come to the rescue and smash the Whites Only sign to state how we all pee in the same toilet. It’s a scene that is both funny and powerful, as with nearly every scene that tries to be entertaining and historic.

Katherine’s arc is so strong that it’s surprising the movie wasn’t solely her story. Dorothy’s tale of becoming a supervisor of NASA’s first computers is interesting and worth noting, but not nearly as intricate to carry an entire picture. Mary’s struggle with attaining a degree to become a top engineer feels as though it’s from another movie as her story doesn’t seem to conclude with space launch and is mostly forgotten amid the stronger scenes. Also wedged into the story are the racial riots of the time, but seen more from a distance as not to distract from the simpler struggles of trying to be promoted in NASA and pee in the same building. We don’t see much harassment in the streets, but we see plenty of Jim Parsons as a softly racist engineer trying to undermine Katherine and failing every time.

The movie is still very strong, however, when it focuses more on the science angle and less on trying to be all-encompassing of the racism of the era. It’s exciting to be caught up in the excitement of Katherine’s math, scribbling on a chalkboard as the music builds towards the inevitable snap of the soundtrack as she circles the answer. There’s plenty of tension as the rocket launches and the directors make the tough call of whether or not to accept Katherine’s choices of trajectory. For as strong as the movie forces us to cheer for every single scene, it’s impossible not to be caught up in the plucky and determined nature of these women that did amazing things.

Hidden Figures has already been promoted as a must for the classroom; several schools were given the chance to view the movie for free in theaters and are even being offered the movie on DVD for free to be seen in classes across America. And, yes, it is best suited for schools that want to hit a triple-hitter of covering science, history and female empowerment all in one neat little package. If the movie can inspire to such lengths, then it’s a littler easier to look past its made-for-moms format of pushing for a soft and cheer-worthy approach to such a powerful aspect of NASA history.

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