Rent Funny Pages (2022)

3.0 of 5 from 142 ratings
1h 43min
Rent Funny Pages (aka Two Against Nature) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
Robert (Daniel Zolghadri) believes that to be an artist is to suffer. So, he gives up on his affluent Princeton upbringing and drops out of high school in favour of life in a stuffy New Jersey apartment to really commit himself to his art. Robert sustains his new lifestyle by working part-time at the comic store, and part-time at the office of a public defender. It is there he first meets Wallace (Matthew Maher), who, Robert finds out, once worked as a colour separator for the legendary Image Comics. Ignoring Wallace's borderline-deranged personality, Robert becomes besotted, leading him down a chaotic path of misadventures.
Actors:
, , Miles Emanuel, , , , , , Cleveland Thomas Jr., Rob M. Anderson, , Tony Hassini, , , Sylvia Michael Martinez, Shane Fleming, , , Charlie Judkins, Robert Cribbie
Directors:
Producers:
Sebastian Bear-McClard, Oscar Boyson, Ronald Bronstein, David Duque-Estrada, Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie
Writers:
Owen Kline
Aka:
Two Against Nature
Studio:
Curzon / Artificial Eye
Genres:
Comedy
BBFC:
Release Date:
12/12/2022
Run Time:
103 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Digital 5.1, English LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
12/12/2022
Run Time:
106 minutes
Languages:
English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, English LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B

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Reviews (2) of Funny Pages

Highly skilled and original comedy - Funny Pages review by PD

Spoiler Alert
23/01/2023

Owen Kline's very enjoyable debut film is filled with people who look like they stepped right out of the underground comix his teenage protagonist, Robert (the totally convincing Daniel Zolghadri), reveres. There's Miles, Robert’s mild-mannered best friend and a fellow aspiring comic-book artist who has a face like a moonscape of cystic acne, and frizzy, shoulder-length hair that frames him like a pair of old curtains; then there's Barry, an older man with whom Robert briefly shares an apartment, who has the crimson, permanently sweaty features of an old music-hall star who has somehow been transported to the 21st-century Trenton; and most importantly the highly volatile Wallace, the former Image Comics employee Robert hitches up to as a real professional despite Wallace’s protestations. Wallace is the most distinctive of all: superbly played by Matthew Maher, his ovoid head, combined with a constant look of suspicion, is a walking self-satire. With these absurd characters and various agonising situations, the film is often both very funny and beautifully excruciating.

There's an awful lot of underdeveloped ideas, but the basic theme is someone eager to cast off his upper-middle-class existence for the squalor and struggle he sees as essential to artistic legitimacy, and the visual divide between its main character and the people he surrounds himself with serves as a constant reminder of that contrast. The idea of authenticity that so grips him comes from the artists Robert studies, but also from his teacher, Mr. Katano, who opens the film exhorting his mentee to embrace subversion and to skip college, lest it ruin him. Katano clearly oversees a kind of misfit sanctuary in school and in his own home, though he crosses a line in a deliberately weird first scene and suffers the consequences. As with Holden Caulfield, Robert is a moody, troubled teenager channelling his general angst into going off on his own, declaring to the exasperation of his Princeton parents his intentions to drop out of school (although, crucially, he quickly runs back home to them when the going gets rough). Kline’s got a lot of talent, and a readiness to lean into the peevishness of Robert’s naïve rebellion without overdoing it, but while his affection for the oddballs he puts on screen feels genuine, you get the feeling that he regards them as good material rather than real people, and a very contrived, messy final act doesn't help. Nevertheless, a highly skilled and original piece overall, and the very last couple of minutes are very effective.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Weird Comedy With Little Laughs - Funny Pages review by GI

Spoiler Alert
25/11/2023

Despite lots of accolades especially on the festival circuit I found this coming of age comedy to be excruciating and dull. It's dark, bizarre and mostly in bad taste to the extent that I couldn't find anything in it at all funny. Talented young graphic artist, Robert (Daniel Zolghadri) who longs to work in comic books shuns his comfortable life with his parents and heads off to squalor and an entourage of misfits on the idea that he has to suffer for his art! This brings him into contact with some truly disgusting people including the weird Miles (Matthew Maher) who he eventually takes home to his parents with disastrous results. As an indie comedy I'm sure this will have fans but it did nothing for me mainly because it dwelt far to hungrily on grotesques and nerds to the detriment of a decent story and script.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

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