Rent Saint Maud (2019)

3.3 of 5 from 608 ratings
1h 21min
Rent Saint Maud Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
Live-in nurse Maud (Morfydd Clark) arrives to help Amanda (Jennifer Ehle), a famous dancer now frail from illness in her grand, isolated house. Amanda is intrigued by the religious young woman, distracting her from her failing health, and Maud is bewitched by her patient, but she is not what she seems...Tormented by a violent secret from her past and ecstatic messages she believes are from God, Maud becomes convinced she was sent to Amanda not as a nurse, but as a divine saviour. As her grip on reality weakens, Maud is determined to save Amanda's soul, by any means necessary.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , Joanna Richardson, , , , , , , ,
Directors:
Rose Glass
Producers:
Andrea Cornwell, Oliver Kassman
Writers:
Rose Glass
Others:
Rose Glass (Writer/Director), Oliver Kassman (Producer)
Studio:
Studio Canal (Optimum)
Genres:
Drama, Horror, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
01/02/2021
Run Time:
81 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Audio Commentary with Writer Director Rose Glass and Editor Mark Towns
  • Creating the World
  • Virtual Q&A with Rose Glass and Film Critic Robbie Collin
  • Constructing the Scene
  • Maud and Amanda
BBFC:
Release Date:
01/02/2021
Run Time:
84 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Audio Commentary with Writer Director Rose Glass and Editor Mark Towns
  • Creating the World
  • Virtual Q&A with Rose Glass and Film Critic Robbie Collin
  • Constructing the Scene
  • Maud and Amanda

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Reviews (10) of Saint Maud

Bit of a let down - Saint Maud review by TH

Spoiler Alert
09/02/2021

I have been looking forward to this film ever since the great reviews from critics and the trailer which looked really interesting.

However I feel like I'm missing something. I get the story and get the message but I just didnt really engage with it.

The acting was decent enough and the religious imagery was great but the plot felt very drawn out and as others have said this felt more of a drama and less of a thriller or horror that this was marketed as.

I guess it had high hope and felt a bit let down.

Added the 2nd star for the ending

8 out of 9 members found this review helpful.

Excellent and original - Saint Maud review by NJ

Spoiler Alert
06/02/2021

Okay its hard to be original nowadays but this film is actually as good as the critics reviews. Don't understand the 'horror' label, it's a smart pyschological drama, with the viewer trying to piece together who Maude actually is, and why she has 'found God'. You wonder what is real and what is imagination.

Highly recommended.

3 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Moving study of a troubled soul - Saint Maud review by PD

Spoiler Alert
07/02/2021

This powerful debut from Rose Glass is one of those religious fanatic meets psychological horror things, charting the gradual breakdown of a lonely young woman convinced that she is on a divine mission, and features a terrific performance from Jennifer Ehle as faded celebrity Amanda, and a bold, quietly nerve-shredding lead from Morfydd Clark. It's at its best when it sticks to psychological unease (the first half) and at its worst when it goes for the horror (the last section).

Clark as Maud is really good throughout, but especially in the claustrophobic live-in nurse first half, supplying palliative care to the prickly, cynical Amanda, who surprisingly warms to Maud’s artless devotion and God-given / self-appointed divine purpose to save this ‘lost soul’. The film’s classiness lies in the way that, for the most part, it depicts a realistic depiction of Maud’s mentally and economically distressed world, superbly evoked in Paulina Rzeszowksa’s production design and in Ben Fordesman’s camerawork (I'll ignore the score, which is awful). Rather than weigh things down with too much pathological case history, Glass adroitly lets us guess at the background of a seemingly brainwashed cradle-Catholic, but who, as revealed partly in encounters with a former co-worker, once lived a very different life and is anything but. Glass also impressively achieves a delicate balance in taking Maud’s religious conviction seriously, while sensitively portraying the mental disturbance that drives it, and astutely uses religious imagery to get inside Maud’s head (it didn't need William Blake, but I gettit), whilst being just as skillful in portraying the painful near-immobility of Amanda, whose art has stood for the freedom of the female body. While the story is clearly set in the present, production design, costumes etc subtly blur markers of the period, with hints of the 60s and 70s. This teasing indeterminacy gives the film a timelessness that also accentuates its echoes of Polanski’s Repulsion; indeed, Clark gives a performance that is as bold, and as vulnerably isolated, as Catherine Deneuve, and that's quite something.

Glass overplays her hand in the second section where the film briefly lurches into more generic horror mode, which jars with the painstakingly established realism. But overall, the film is ultimately successful, a moving study of a troubled soul.

3 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Saint Maud review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Faith becomes a major question in Saint Maud as it plagues the mind of Katie. She’s a nurse who has just endured the tragic event of losing a patient in her care. She tried to save the patient but failed. Katie tries to start fresh by changing her name to Maud and becomes deeply religious as a Catholic. Now a new person, she jumps back into the profession by acting as a nurse for the elderly Amanda, a dancer/choreographer with stage four lymphoma. But the job proves to be tougher than she thought with her newfound lifestyle.

Katie attempts to reform herself as someone who is better bound by Catholic ethics and belief, a mindset that clashes greatly with the cynical Amanda and her even more cynical love interest of Carol. Katie/Maud is under the impression that Amanda’s immoral lifestyle of booze, drugs, sex, and parties is a challenge for her. Considering Amanda is an atheist, Maud believes it is her destiny to bring someone like Amanda back into the graces of God. But even maintaining that allegiance towards her religion is proving tough when everyone seems to look down on Maud as the meek in need of a good shag.

Throughout her job, Maud continually has dark visions of the devil in her descent back into sin. She seeks out companionship and goes home to sleep with a man but starts seeing horrific sights of blood and demons, seemingly taunting her with her sins. There’s a constant questioning just how much of Maud’s encounters with the paranormal is a real aspect of her embracement of faith or her mental breakdown creating these monsters for her. As the film goes on, it becomes a bit more obvious that these visions are in her head, especially with her final scene of ascension that is revealed for a split second to be a horrific mistake.

So the film is less of a mystery as to what Maud is seeing and more about why she is seeing these things. Does she need to see this type of terror to justify her faith? Were they placed there by a subconscious desire to lash out, used an excuse to kill someone to get the demons out of them?

Saint Maud is a film kept deeply internal by rarely focusing on the external of Maud’s psychological state. We see everything she witnesses and feels, not to mention wants to see from the world around her. She wants to believe there’s good and compassion in this world but receives it from nobody despite her earnest efforts. There is only scorn and disgust for her ways. She tries to give hope to a homeless person but he brushes her off. Maud tries to tell Carol to watch her language but is instead cussed at further. In one of her more humiliating moments, Maud is embarrassed by a drunk Amanda who continually mocks the girl at a party.

It’s tough to process Saint Maud given its mixed-bag approach to the topic of religious dogma. The topic does allow for some twisty scenes and great moments of terror but the ultimate resolve of trying to find some meaning in Maud’s meandering nature ultimately leaves the film more aloof than it needed to be. It’s a decent horror production but more for its assembly than anything else.

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