Rent Us (2019)

3.3 of 5 from 863 ratings
1h 52min
Rent Us Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
After spending a tense beach day with their friends, the Tylers (Elizabeth Moss, Tim Heidecker, Cali Sheldon, Noelle Sheldon), Adelaide (Lupita Nyong'o) and her family return to their vacation home. When darkness falls, the Wilsons discover the silhouette of four figures holding hands as they stand in the driveway. 'Us' pits an endearing American family against a terrifying and uncanny opponent: doppelgängers of themselves.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , Madison Curry, Ashley Mckoy, , , Alan Frazier, Duke Nicholson, , , , Ashia Camille
Directors:
Producers:
Jordan Peele, Jason Blum, Ian Cooper, Sean McKittrick
Writers:
Jordan Peele
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
Horror, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
29/07/2019
Run Time:
112 minutes
Languages:
Anglicized English Audio Description, English, French, Italian
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Hindi, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • The Monsters Within 'Us'
  • Tethered Together: Making 'Us' Twice
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Redefining a Genre: Jordan Peele's Brand of Horror
  • We're All Dying
  • As Above, So Below: Grand Pas De Deux
  • Becoming Red
  • The Duality of 'Us'
BBFC:
Release Date:
29/07/2019
Run Time:
116 minutes
Languages:
Anglicized English Audio Description, English, French, Italian, Spanish
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Greek, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • The Monsters Within 'Us'
  • Tethered Together: Making 'Us' Twice
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Redefining a Genre: Jordan Peele's Brand of Horror
  • We're All Dying
  • As Above, So Below: Grand Pas De Deux
  • Becoming Red
  • The Duality of 'Us'
  • Scene Explorations
BBFC:
Release Date:
29/07/2019
Run Time:
116 minutes
Languages:
English, French, Hungarian, Italian, Polish
Subtitles:
Cantonese, Complex Mandarin, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • The Monsters Within 'Us'
  • Tethered Together: Making 'Us' Twice
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Redefining a Genre: Jordan Peele's Brand of Horror
  • We're All Dying
  • As Above, So Below: Grand Pas De Deux
  • Becoming Red
  • The Duality of 'Us'
  • Scene Explorations

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Reviews (15) of Us

Not very good - Us review by DF

Spoiler Alert
04/08/2019

Very disappoint after Jordan’s first effort Get Out, not  sure how it can be called an horror, i’ve seen episodes of Scooby Doo that we’re more scary, but as they say each to their own, 

8 out of 15 members found this review helpful.

One of the very best - Us review by CS

Spoiler Alert
09/08/2019

Get Out was excellent but this follow up is even better. One of the best 'cross over' horrors ever and should appeal to mainstream audiences.

Instead of relying on blood and gore (though there's enough of that), the suspense builds within a narrative that explores the threat posed by the 'return of the repressed'. If Get Out was a commentary on American race relations, this is a far wider exploration of the role of 'others' within and outside the self. Excellently acted, taut in plot and well placed occasional humour to lighten the suspense, this is a must see that will probably reward repeat viewings. 

6 out of 11 members found this review helpful.

A great original watch - Us review by AL

Spoiler Alert
14/08/2019

I had no expectations of this film, I'm not one to compare directors bodies of work or judge a film based purely on a previous body of work.

Us is a great film, well acted, original (yes some parts can be compared to other films but show me a film that can't), and an all round good watch.

Tense at times, with a bit of gore and mayhem but quite mild by today's standards, thought provoking and thoroughly enjoyable.

Watch it for what it is and in a you will enjoy it too.

5 out of 9 members found this review helpful.

What was that all about? - Us review by Paul Roffey - Writer

Spoiler Alert
01/09/2020

This is a strange film.

Us is the story of the Wilson family; wife, husband, little boy, little girl. They have a nice beach house, they drive a Mercedes; stereotypical middle class America. They return from the beach one afternoon after spending some time with the Tyler family; very cliché rich, selfish, not quite friends. That evening the Wilson’s youngest son spots a family standing hand in hand at the end of their driveway. As they approach the house it becomes obvious that they are clones of the family themselves. However, they each carry very sharp scissors and turn out to be the extreme dark side of happy families.

At this point I was intrigued, especially as the film began with some narrative sentences about how many tunnels there are in the US, and how a large number of them have an unknown purpose. In other words, what could have been going on down there?

The film then continues as a relentless, bloody, violent and at times remarkably senseless killing spree—by both families—the soulless doppelgangers and the American dream. And, at one point, that’s where I thought the film was going; in the direction of a morality tale of the modern day America, a tale of the haves and the have-nots. And the have-nots have risen to overthrow the haves. This was hinted at early in the film by the dark mother figure. She bemoaned how hard a life they had been forced to live, underground, spliced from themselves, and pointing out that they too were ‘Americans’. Interestingly the film is called U.S.

But that’s as far as I got in understanding this convoluted film. To be fair there is a fabulous twist near the end, but even after that I didn’t understand what I’d just watched.

All films, and books, look for resonance in their endings. All creators of art, in fact, want viewers or readers to walk away from their creations still digesting, still wondering. I just walked away confused, and like many a French film I‘ve seen, left wondering what the point was. In defence of French films, they are usually superbly written and shot. The characters are three dimensional, the dialogue sharp and engaging.

This film is poorly written. At times the dialogue is corny, when it should have been nervy and cutting. However, the cast is excellent, especially as each actor is playing both sides of itself, the ego and alter ego. Many times in close combat. Lupita Nyong'o, brilliant in the wonderful 12 Years a Slave, pretty much holds this film together. A mention must also be made of the very good Evan Alex, who played the youngest child. Only 11 years old in real life when the film was released.

If you want fast moving, violent action, then by all means. But if there is anyone out there who can explain to me what the plot is, I’d love to hear it.

paulroffey.co.uk

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Us review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Jordan Peele’s Us is the kind of horror that is so lovely subtle, beautiful, and thematically dense that you just wanna race back for a second viewing. Peele’s previous picture Get Out was such a smash-hit of horror with great social commentary and satire amid its wild premise fit for the Twilight Zone. And he thankfully proves here that he’s not just a one-note director but a multifaceted one as well, weaving a brilliantly layered film that touches on so much while still being a rip-roaring romp of a slasher picture.

Lupita Nyong'o shines particularly bright in the role of Adelaide Wilson, a woman with a frightening past. As a child, she walked alone along Santa Cruz beach and stumbled into a dark hall of mirrors, encountering a doppelganger of herself. The experience left her traumatized but she grew up and became stable enough to have a loving family. Her husband, Gabe (Winston Duke), is a fun guy who, despite his many dad jokes and dad-isms, has managed to push aside Adelaide’s dread at least temporarily. Her children (Shahadi Wright Joseph, Evan Alex) are also great sources of love while still being odd and quirky people still defining themselves.

But Adelaide still has the nightmares of her past and it’s coming back to haunt her when the family wants to take a trip close to Santa Cruz. She masks her terror but there’s still an unshakable sense of anxiety on this family vacation. And it turns out she’s right to be scared when some strange people show up at their vacation home. Seen in the darkness and shadows at first, the killers soon break in and reveal themselves to be twisted versions of Adelaide’s family, dressed in red and wielding scissors as their weapons. Who are they? The red-dressed Adelaide duplicate offers one answer: Americans.

From that line of dialogue, one might deduce that Us is an allegory all about nationalism, especially with the constant red, a wall of people tethered together, and the undercurrent of lower class rising up again the more fortunate. But the film never makes it message all that clear, keeping the true meaning hidden behind the gorgeous cinematography, fast pacing, and twisted kills. Peele doesn’t make his film an easily-digestible follow-up by staging the presence of the bitter white couple played by Elisabeth Moss and Tim Heidecker as secretly sinister forces. More evident throughout the picture, and the mantra of the story, is that sometimes the most terrifying monster is indeed ourselves, playing greatly into Peele’s thematic trademark of his films being about the mutation and loss of identity.

Another mark Peele makes in this film is how well he can shoot scenes. Nobody could forget that moment of the Sunken Place reveal from Get Out, where Daniel Kaluuya’s character goes wide-eyed with bloodshot optics and tears rolling. Lupita Nyong'o has a similar shot in this picture as well but her performance is something else entirely. She’s expected to not only play Adelaide and her double but also different versions of each hidden behind by shocking secrets with chilling reveals. And let’s not forget Peele’s ease of humor, able to maintain a consistent tone of silly commentary with the family, even when the blood starts spilling.

One could try to compare Us to the likes of other horror greats, even noting the vast similarities to the works of Stanley Kubrick and Brian De Palma, but I believe Peele’s mastery of the genre goes beyond that of such comparisons. He’s using familiar trademarks but also fashioning new and unique ones that will define him as a compellingly original director. Consider how two of the most notable recurring elements of Us are the presence of rabbits and the bible passage of Jerimiah 11:11. Peele’s script never outright explains the bunnies or the passage, leaving the film open for theories on the same level of The Shining. What an inspiring and intricate horror that will no doubt lead to more challenging productions from both Peele and those amazed by this film.

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