Rent Embodiment of Evil (2008)

3.0 of 5 from 51 ratings
1h 34min
Rent Embodiment of Evil (aka Engarnacao de Demonio) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
After serving a 40 year prison term, Coffin Joe (José Mojica Marins) is finally released. Back on the streets, the sadistic undertaker is set upon fulfilling the goal which sent him to jail in the first place: find a woman who can give him the perfect child. During his search throughout the city of Sao Paulo he leaves behind a trail of horror, coming up against supernatural laws and folk superstitions
Actors:
, , Adriano Stuart, , , José Celso Martinez Corrêa, Cristina Aché, , Débora Muniz, Thaís Simi, Cleo de Paris, Nara Sakarê, , Eduardo Chagas, , Raymond Castile, Karina Bez Batti, Fernanda Brandão, Rubens Mello, Zumba
Directors:
Producers:
Caio Gullane, Fabiano Gullane, Débora Ivanov, Paulo Sacramento
Writers:
Dennison Ramalho, José Mojica Marins
Aka:
Engarnacao de Demonio
Studio:
Anchor Bay
Genres:
Horror
Countries:
Brazil, Horror
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/07/2009
Run Time:
94 minutes
Languages:
Portuguese
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Making Of Featurette
  • Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/07/2009
Run Time:
94 minutes
Languages:
Portuguese Dolby Digital 2.0, Portuguese Dolby TrueHD 5.1
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Making Of Featurette
  • Trailer

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Reviews (1) of Embodiment of Evil

‘Nails grow even after death.’ Mild spoilers ... - Embodiment of Evil review by NP

Spoiler Alert
31/01/2019

This is an extraordinary tale, featuring the return, after a 40-year incarceration, of the notorious Coffin Joe, long believed dead. With nothing more than some huge, curling fingernails, José Mojica Marins (a bearded Brazilian Bela Lugosi, who also directs and writes) cuts an imposing figure, and it isn’t long before he is up to his metaphorical horns in evil. It doesn’t go all his way by any means, however, as he appears to be haunted by the ghosts of those he has wronged in the past – a past illustrated by many flashbacks.

This is very much a sequel rather than a standalone film and as such, I found myself enjoying the Faust-ian imagery and the demonic nature of Marins’ heightened performance rather than trying to figure out precisely what was going on (the previous two instalments were produced in the late 1960s). As it makes no great effort to embrace a viewer unfamiliar with any earlier chapters, things can dissolve into a dark soup of shouting and wailing (and torture), a soup not thinned by any sympathetic characters or anyone an audience can relate to. Everyone we meet is a grotesque of sorts, and what they may lack in empathy, they succeed in collectively conjuring up a relentless environment of horror.

His mission is to ensure the ‘continuation of his blood’. That is, he very much likes the idea of procreation. We are not spared this, either. It is a grisly, saturating scene, carried out without ever removing his Mephistophelean top hat and cape.

It wouldn’t be entering into the spirit of things to question why the authorities wait until Coffin Joe has committed many bloody atrocities since they reluctantly released him from jail, before investigating his activities. This is a world within a world, and if you are in the right frame of mind, is hellish and immersive. If not, it comes across as being somewhat one-note.

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