Rent Five Minarets in New York (2010)

3.1 of 5 from 59 ratings
1h 38min
Rent Five Minarets in New York Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
Istanbul, Turkey; Two of Turkey's top Secret Police Officers undertake covert anti-terror operations to uncover the true identity of a dangerous Islamic leader known only as 'Dajjal'. Through violent raids and brutal interrogations they uncover his real name. New York; Led by Agent Becker (Robert Patrick) the FBI arrest a prominent Muslim scholar and family man Hadji Gumush in connection with an international arrest warrant issued by Interpol. Have the FBI found Dajjal? The Turkish secret police officers are swiftly dispatched to New York to assist in the extradition, but the handover is far from simple.
With the support of his wife (Gina Gershon) and close friend Marcus (Danny Glover) Hadji manages to elude the authorities and go into hiding. But one of the officers did not travel all that way to just let him disappear quietly into the night; a lifetime of vengeance is about to be unleashed. In this nail biting action-thriller hunter and prey realise they have more in common than they first thought, setting them on a violent course that will force them to face the heart of their faith.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , William Rueger, , , , , , ,
Directors:
Voiced By:
Ümit Okur
Writers:
Mahsun Kirmizigül
Studio:
Showbox
Genres:
Drama, Thrillers
Countries:
Turkey, Drama, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
07/11/2011
Run Time:
98 minutes
Languages:
English, Turkish
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Original trailer
  • Production gallery
  • Bonus featurette – Intro to Cine Asia

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Reviews (2) of Five Minarets in New York

Dreadful. - Five Minarets in New York review by JD

Spoiler Alert
16/06/2013

I disagree slightly with a previous critic in that I think Danny Glover is always dreadful. In this however he is truly awful. Some of the acting is fair but none is good and I definitely agree about the embarrassment and that the plot could have been done so much better. There is no one to whom this will appeal.

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Critic review

Five Minarets in New York review by Melissa Orcine - Cinema Paradiso

From Turkish writer-director Mahsun Kirmizigül comes a riveting tale of two Turkish police officers sent to New York City to retrieve the notorious Islamic terrorist, code name: DAJJAL, in ‘Five Minarets In New York’. What starts out as a routine police undertaking becomes an international issue of terrorism and the politics that accompany it.

Mahsun Kirmizigül is a capable film maker; the first scenes of ‘Five Minarets In New York’ is action-thriller gold. By the first sequences, you are already hooked, but the film is much more than that. The Turkish officers, Firat Baran (Mahsun Kirmizigül himself) and Acar Dogan work closely with the FBI, particularly a bigoted agent (Robert Patrick) and NYPD to find Hadji Gumus, now a well-respected Muslim scholar who’s been imprisoned in Turkey but lives in New York City with a wife and children.

From there, the plot thickens. We become embroiled in the burgeoning tension amongst the law enforcers and the terrorist whom they have captured. When we find Hadji’s American friend and sympathizer (Danny Glover), things only get more complicated. What used to be a simple person transfer has become a test of wills.

‘Five Minarets In New York’ is an action film but it cannot be helped that it raises many political themes as well. Sure, the terrorist in question –Hadji— is Muslim yet it does not pre-suppose that all terrorists are. In fact, Hadji is the most unlikely terrorist: educated; a family man who lives a quiet life. You may say that ‘Five Minarets In New York’ is the anti-‘Four Lions’, another film that centers on terrorists. With the comedy ‘Four Lions’ it made Muslims more human and bungling at that; in Kirmizigül’s take, Muslims are just like us.

There are also questions of freedom; in Hadji’s case, he fled Turkey because he claims he is innocent. When your freedom is being threatened, wouldn’t you do just about anything to keep it? The film is worth watching.

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