Rent The Souvenir (2019)

2.7 of 5 from 463 ratings
1h 45min
Rent The Souvenir Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
Julie (Honor Swinton Byrne) is a young film student struggling to find a firm direction in life when she meets the seemingly unwavering and decisive Anthony (Tom Burke). The two immediately take to one another and an intense romance blossoms between them. However, as the relationship develops it becomes clear that Anthony is not being honest about all aspects of himself and Julie slowly discovers that the)' could have potentially devastating consequences for them both.
One of Britain's most unique filmmakers Joanna Hogg (Archipelago, Unrelated) presents a deeply personal examination of her own youthful experiences in this beautifully crafted, Martin Scorsese produced portrait of self discovery, 'The Souvenir'.
Actors:
, , , , , , Hannah Ashby Ward, Janet Etuk, Chyna Terrelonge-Vaughan, , , , James Dodds, , Steve Gough, Crispin Buxton, James Spencer Ashworth, , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Joanna Hogg, Luke Schiller
Writers:
Joanna Hogg
Studio:
Curzon / Artificial Eye
Genres:
British Films, Drama, Romance
Countries:
UK
Awards:

2019 Sundance Film Festival World Cinema Grand Jury Prize Dramatic

BBFC:
Release Date:
04/11/2019
Run Time:
105 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.66:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
04/11/2019
Run Time:
109 minutes
Languages:
English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, English LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.66:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B

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Reviews (14) of The Souvenir

One to miss - The Souvenir review by AL

Spoiler Alert
13/01/2020

After watching, or should I say enduring the film, I found that all the glowing reviews were from arty film critics.

Audience reviews are usually at odds with them.

For me I found it slow, over-long, boring, pointless and pretentious.

The best part was when it ended!

11 out of 14 members found this review helpful.

Engaging and intriguing - The Souvenir review by PD

Spoiler Alert
13/11/2019

Joanna Hogg's latest film is never not engaging. Her protagonist, Julie (beautifully played by Honor Swinton Byrne), is a 24-year-old 'privileged' woman with a Knightsbridge flat who wants to make a film about a boy growing up by the docks of Sunderland. Quizzed by authority figures sceptical of her choice to stray so far from her own experience, Julie speaks of her insularity, her class privilege, her need to cultivate a socially conscious aesthetic. She pores over black-and-white footage of working-class boys in a school playground , leaning into her manual typewriter (it’s the 1980s) and struggling to concoct a story line. The people who question Julie’s motivation for telling this story are Men Who Explain Things to Her. Enter stage right, Anthony — seen only from the back at first — holding forth in a plummy voice on her proposed characters (“Why are they more real than me?”) and wondering whether she’s trying to peddle a “received idea of life on the docks.” He’s perhaps a bit too ridiculous (“You’re very special, Julie.” “Very normal, really.” “You’re a freak.” “I think I’m quite average.” “You’re lost, and you’ll always be lost”) to be entirely convincing. Indeed, you do wonder if they'd ever be in a relationship in real life - 'how on earth did they get together?' someone asks at some point, and we're inclined to agree, whilst we often want to shout at Julie for her indecision and inability to see the blindingly obvious, but perhaps that's exactly what Hogg wants us to feel. First impressions are soon revealed to be turned on their head, and while Anthony is denying and denying and playing head games (“I know you have a received version of what I’m supposed to be”), Julie is struggling in film school to learn to frame her experience. There’s some loose talk of the mechanics of Psycho and some stabs (no pun intended) at directing scenes, but no artistic breakthroughs. (Not in this installment, anyway: The Souvenir: Part II is in preproduction). Anthony claims to work for the Foreign Office, but a note of scepticism is in order for the simple reason that, as Julie slowly discovers, he has a habit of lying about nearly everything.

The title refers to a painting by the 18th-century French artist Jean-Honore Fragonard that Anthony and Julie view on one of their 'dates'. It depicts a young woman, scrutinised by her pet dog, carving letters into the trunk of a tree. “She’s very much in love,” Anthony says with his usual suave certainty, and perhaps he’s right. But there’s a lot more going on in the picture (as in the film) than that simple declaration would suggest. The woman is making a mark and putting down a marker, declaring her own presence with a mixture of shame and audacity, impulsiveness and deliberation. So, Julie does love Anthony, and sacrifices a great deal for him without quite realising what she’s doing. Over the span of the film her friends slip away, and the work that had seemed so urgent feels a bit more remote. But the interplay of forces in Julie’s life is subtle, as is the balance, in her own temperament, between decisiveness and passivity.

What's the point? Mmm ... well I suppose it's something to do with the director digging into her own past. In her stunning first film, Unrelated (2007), a story of a 40-ish woman who joins a friend’s family in Italy while trying to come to terms with not having children is steeped in honest sentiment, but without being sentimental. It feels detached, but when you get it, you’re overwhelmed by it. We don't get the same feeling here, and because Hogg rarely moves the camera, we might well feel marooned with people you don’t know for reasons we don’t understand. But Hogg usually convinces us that this is the only honest way to tell a story with any emotional complexity. An intriguing piece of filmaking with lots to offer for the patient and those who can live without a conventional narrative thread.

10 out of 13 members found this review helpful.

Souvenir is memorable - The Souvenir review by JF

Spoiler Alert
16/01/2020

Another strong and interesting film from Joanna Hogg. I've loved the truthfulness of the relationships in her other films and this is more personal, apparently autobiographical and equally believable. There is poetry and symbolism in the way she reprises images through the film. Hogg should be winning prizes.

3 out of 7 members found this review helpful.

Slow is only ok if its good. - The Souvenir review by RT

Spoiler Alert
18/03/2020

Im a big fan of French cinema which often has slow moving philosophical films. So this is the type of film I would usually enjoy. However, the characters are just not believable in particular the male lead. I've enjoyed his previous work but here ut just not ring true. As the plot unfolds its not believable that he would act completely normal at start given what transpires. The dialogue also is dull and just does not ring true.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The Souvenir review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

There is a somewhat cathartic comfort in that The Souvenir never compromises with the tragic romance of art and addiction. Honor Swinton Byrne plays Julie, a young and ambitious film student hoping to pursue both a passion in film and love. Her movie idea is to follow a Sunderland family. Her latest roommate is Anthony (Tom Burke), a Foreign Office worker. They have problems; some they talk about, others linger in uncomfortable silence. What follows is quiet desperation of a drama that almost achieves that perfection of the ennui of a troubled artist lifestyle.

Though the film darts around some stylish locale of Europe, Julie’s world seems particularly locked. She is trapped in a world of stuffy, where art and sophistication remain in closed doors, where she fumbles to find the right keys. She feels as though she is ready to take a leap into new worlds and new relationships but isn’t prepared for what she may face. Sometimes it’s as small as an awkward conversation with a family that leads to an uncomfortable itch of social differences. Other times it’s as direct and contentious for when she tries to handle someone with an addiction. Ultimately, she discovers that she can’t merely let herself be whisked away by this lifestyle and take the reigns before she is taken too far for a ride on this artsy train of flighty intellectualism.

Her relationship with Anthony is interesting as it poses the situations that feel tough to confront given her shy nature. As an example, she arrives home to discover her place has been burgled, only for Anthony to admit that he did so. His act of breaking and entering was for his drug habit, which he denies being his reason when it comes up in conversation. So why does Julie goes along with it? Perhaps she just wants to believe it. Perhaps she just wants to see the best in such allure that she can easily accept his rationale. After all, Anthony’s case seems strong for someone like Julie.

The Souvenier is less of a romance and more of an endurance test to see how long someone as wide-eyed and unsure as Julie will continue her love for someone so troubled. It’s remarkable how their relationship ramps up to the point of her catching an illness and Anthony being arrested for her to finally call it off. And, yet, even with this, Julie still can’t tear herself away. This makes the picture rather confounding at times but still intriguing for devoted one person can be to overlook most major shortcomings, dangerous as they may be.

My biggest problem is that the film seems to slip almost too comfortably into this dry sense of connection. Julie’s fascination with Anthony never truly feels whole and is played with straightness so dry it borders on being a comedy. Is it a comedy? There are certainly plenty of moments for things to go super droll and amp up a certain satire of surrealism and tragic romance. For playing itself earnest, however, there’s something mildly enduring about keeping up such a tone. It’ll play well to quietly content arthouse scene but almost to such a degree that it seems almost mystifying how lost the film becomes in its toxic relationship, never going too far to make the characters anything more or less than quietly desperate beings, never fully able to more than devotion or a vice.

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