Rent Straw Dogs (1971)

3.6 of 5 from 128 ratings
1h 53min
Rent Straw Dogs Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
David Summer (Dustin Hoffman) is a quiet American mathematician who has moved with his wife Amy (Susan George) back to a remote Cornish farmhouse near the village where she grew up. The couple have relocated to rural England in an attempt to flee the violence of America but their placid life is brutally interrupted when the savagery and violence they sought to escape engulfs them and threatens to destroy their lives.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , Cherina Schaer, , ,
Directors:
Writers:
David Zelag Goodman, Sam Peckinpah
Others:
Jerry Fielding
Studio:
Fremantle
Genres:
Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
07/10/2002
Run Time:
113 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
DVD Regions:
Region 0 (All)
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • 1971 on location documentary
  • 1971 original US theatrical trailer
  • 1971 3 x US TV spots
  • 1971 2 x US radio spots
  • Commentary from Sam Peckinpah Biographers: Garner Simmons, David Weddle and Paul Seydor
  • Commentary from close friend and PA of Sam Peckinpah: Katy Haber
  • Interview with Susan George - Interview with Producer: Dan Melnick
  • Interview with Sam Peckinpah biographer: Garner Simmons
  • Isolated Jerry Fielding score in Stereo with additional cues
  • On location stills
  • Original publicity stills
  • Original film posters and lobby cards
  • History of Straw Dogs and the censors
  • Reviews, filmographies, facts and fascinating correspondence
BBFC:
Release Date:
24/10/2011
Run Time:
113 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All
Bonus:
  • 1971 Original US theatrical trailer
  • 1971 3 x US TVspots
  • 1971 2 x US radio spots
  • Commentary from Sam Peckinpah Biographers: Garner Simmons, David WeddLe& Paul Seydor
  • Commentary from close friend and PA of Sam Peckinpah Katy Haber Interview with Susan George
  • Interview with Producer Dan Melnick
  • Interview with Sam Peckinpah Biographer Garner Simmons
  • Isolated Jerry Fielding score in Stereo with additional cues
  • On location stills
  • Original publicity stills
  • Original film posters & lobby cards
  • History of Straw Dogs and the Censors
  • Reviews, filmographies, facts & fascinating correspondence
  • Before and After: Restoring a classic

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Reviews (1) of Straw Dogs

Straw Film. - Straw Dogs review by NC

Spoiler Alert
20/09/2018

'Straw Dogs' is remembered as being one of the films which tested the limits of the old X certificate. The violence and (especially) the lingering rape scene were the talk of the pubs and the sixth-form playground of 1971. There is precious little else in the film to talk about.

Peckinpah may have a point that people are just as nasty, and just as prone to extreme behaviour in rural England as they are in urban America, and he has a very serious point in depicting humiliation being one of the drivers of conflict, but he needs characters who are much more than cardboard stereotypes, he needs a script that isn't laughably banal, and he needs actors who do not look as if they wish they were anywhere but on the set.

Peckinpah has Hoffman one minute standing up and acting the lad in an open top car, passionately kissing Susan George in full view of local workers, the next minute he's a repressed fuddy-duddy, interested in nothing but work. His wife, of course, wants all of the former and none of the latter. Told you this was a film of stereotypes. Everything is just a perfunctory prelude to the rape and the bloodbath.

Hoffman gives his usual nervy, mumbling performance. George could easily win many awards for beauty, but absolutely none for acting - though she is unfairly given the worst, most excruciating lines from a writer who presumably had never heard a woman open her mouth before. The suggestion that women may actually enjoy rape is the lowest point of this crass, nasty piece of work.

The film only becomes remotely watchable when the two greats Peter Vaughan and T.P. McKenna come on the screen. How they must have regretted appearing in such tripe.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

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