Rent Aftersun (2022)

3.5 of 5 from 400 ratings
1h 38min
Rent Aftersun Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
The stunning debut from Scottish writer-director Charlotte Wells, 'Aftersun' juxtaposes a hopeful coming-of-age story with a poignant, intimate family portrait that leaves an indelible impression. At a fading vacation resort in the late 1990's, 11-year-old Sophie (Frankie Corio) treasures rare time together with her loving and idealistic father, Calum (Paul Mescal). As a world of adolescence creeps into view, beyond her eye Calum struggles under the weight of life outside of fatherhood.
Twenty years later, Sophie's tender recollections of their last holiday become a powerful and heartrending portrait of their relationship, as she tries to reconcile the father, she knew with the man she didn't, in Charlotte Wells' superb and searingly emotional debut film.
Actors:
, Frankie Corio, , , Ayse Parlak, Sophia Lamanova, Brooklyn Toulson, , Frank Corio, Harry Perdios, Ruby Thompson, , Onur Eksioglu, Cafer Karahan, Kayleigh Coleman, John Stuifzand, Tyler Mutlu, , Nijat Gachayev, Sarah Makharine
Directors:
Charlotte Wells
Producers:
Mark Ceryak, Amy Jackson, Barry Jenkins, Adele Romanski
Writers:
Charlotte Wells
Others:
Lucy Pardee
Studio:
Mubi
Genres:
Children & Family, Drama
Collections:
Award Winners, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2023, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2024, Films to Watch If You Like..., Ireland At the Oscars, Oscar Nominations Competition 2023, What to Watch If You Liked Monsieur Hulot's Holiday?
Awards:

2023 BAFTA Outstanding Debut

BBFC:
Release Date:
20/02/2023
Run Time:
98 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English Dolby Digital 2.0, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing, German, Italian, Spanish, Turkish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Director's Commentary with Charlotte Wells
  • Q&A with Charlotte Wells. Paul Mescal and Frankie Corio
  • Bonus Scene "Palm Trees"
  • Behind the Scenes at the BFI London Film Festival
  • Short Film "Tuesday"
BBFC:
Release Date:
20/02/2023
Run Time:
102 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0, English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing, German, Italian, Spanish, Turkish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Director's Commentary with Charlotte Wells
  • Q&A with Charlotte Wells. Paul Mescal and Frankie Corio
  • Bonus Scene "Palm Trees"
  • Behind the Scenes at the BFI London Film Festival
  • Short Film "Tuesday"

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Reviews (15) of Aftersun

Awful Awful Awful - Aftersun review by MH

Spoiler Alert
07/01/2023

Director on an ego trip delivers a load of meaningless pretentious rubbish. Several people left the cinema at various points in the performance and if it had been possible, I would have gone with them. Waste of time and money.

6 out of 11 members found this review helpful.

Awful ditto - Aftersun review by PB

Spoiler Alert
04/03/2023

Rubbish - I made myself watch the first hour and then had to give up. I thought that it would develop but it didn’t . It was irritating right from the off with what the director must have thought passed for artistic camera angles. I like slow moving films in which nothing much happens but for that kind of film to work you have to feel connected to the characters  - recently saw The Quiet Girl which I thought was magnificent . Luckily I’d also rented The Ascent (Larisa Shepitko) which was an inspiring antidote. Don’t waste your time with Aftersun - it’s a superficial mess

6 out of 10 members found this review helpful.

Dire, simply dire, home movie - Aftersun review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
04/03/2023

If you decide to watch this (beware the trailer that adds poignant music to lure you in unsuspecting), do keep some paint handy in case you decide to watch that dry instead. A man and his young daughter go on holiday to Turkey and we follow their naturalistic day-by-day activities from one inane scene to another. Nothing against the two actors (take the money and run), but they’ve got no chance with someone behind the camera who has absolutely no idea how to shoot a film. With no redeeming visual quality whatsoever, it seems interminable even after you’ve resorted to FF.

It beggars belief that the BFI and Screen Scotland are wasting government and lottery money on this kind of drivel.

5 out of 9 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Aftersun review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

There’s a constant obsession with time in Aftersun's quiet yet somber drama. For the 11-year-old Sophie, it’s just a summer vacation with her dad in Turkey. For her father, the 30-year-old and divorced Calum, it’s so much more than that. It’s a last chance to connect with his daughter. It’s that moment when he watches his kid start showing interest in more adult things. It’s that inevitable heartbreak every parent endures when they must let go of their children and let them flourish. These sweeter moments of saying so little and having that aspect of family bonding are treated with serenity and sadness, fully aware that it will soon end.

The framing of Aftersun is unique in how there’s a desire to capture that essence of youth and hold onto it for as long as possible. In the opening scenes, Sophie records footage of her dad as she talks with him about turning 11. She asks her father what his 11th birthday was like. There’s a pregnant pause, a brief moment of unease as Calum remembers that time and searches for the right words. There’s a fear of the past and future within that moment that becomes all the more heartwrenching when Calum later comes clean with Sophie about what his 11th birthday was like.

Paul Mescal delivers a pitch-perfect performance as a father who is both in the moment and terrified of the passage of time. He holds back his tears well while aspects of his past linger in every conversation. Brief glimpses of a club setting blink out of his memories as he struggles to be there for his daughter and keep his distance. Sometimes he stumbles into granting her independence, as when he forgets to give his daughter a key to the hotel room. Sometimes he’s let down gently, as when a pool game goes from being chaperoned to youth only. Sometimes Calum gracefully accepts his daughter’s progression, as when she brings up that she kissed a boy her same age. The little moments of snapping Polaroids and dancing with his daughter become golden memories he wants to preserve in any way.

Calum’s stoic nature around his daughter is equal parts admirable and tragic. You can sense that there’s a part of them that just wants to embrace his daughter and sob uncontrollably but also another part of him that doesn’t want to ruin these simple pleasures. Something as familiar as sitting by the pool and saying very little as he hangs out with his kid are sweet moments that become ambered in a golden silence, where very little has to be said. So many of these little moments of joy combine to make the ultimate departure from the vacation a turning point with tragic farewells. This leads to the unforgettable final shot of watching the footage recorded years later and walking down a hallway to the next chapter of life.

Aftersun is an understated masterpiece by Charlotte Wells. It’s a film that perfectly captures an almost indescribable melancholy that comes with being a parent. It’s not that Calum’s job as a parent ends during this vacation, but a certain period of that relationship dies on this trip. As with many films that deal with existential crises, this film accepts this passing of life with wondrous grace and tearful realization. It’s such an unforgettable encapsulation of viewing a coming-of-age story from the perspective of a parent.

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