Rent Hostiles (2017)

3.4 of 5 from 768 ratings
2h 8min
Rent Hostiles Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
1892, New Mexico - legendary Army captain Joseph J. Blocker (Christian Bale) undertakes one final mission before retirement: escort Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) - a dying Cheyenne war chief - and his family back to sacred tribal lands. After 20 years of violent struggle, this gesture of peace is as unthinkable as it is harrowing. Together they battle against a punishing landscape and the brutality of men alike, coming to the rescue of a young widow (Rosamund Pike) amidst the carnage of her murdered family. Two great warriors, once rivals across the battlefield, must learn to trust each other and find peace in an unforgiving land.
A heroic odyssey of survival, 'Hostiles' becomes a story not about the miles travelled nor the battles fought, but the journey towards respect, reconciliation and forgiveness.
Actors:
, , , , , Gray Wolf Herrera, , , , , , , , , , , , Xavier Horsechief, ,
Directors:
Producers:
Scott Cooper, Ken Kao, John Lesher
Writers:
Scott Cooper, Donald E. Stewart
Studio:
Entertainment In Video
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Top 100 Films, Drama
BBFC:
Release Date:
30/04/2018
Run Time:
128 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
30/04/2018
Run Time:
133 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • A Journey of the Soul: The Making of Hostiles
  • Part 1 - Provenance
  • Part 2 - Removing the Binds
  • Part 3 - Don't Look Back
  • Trailer

Rent other films like Hostiles

Reviews (20) of Hostiles

Well worth a watch - Hostiles review by JG

Moody and earthy film that depicts the butchery and atrocities of the American West as seen through the eyes of soldier, settler and a native Indian.

Christian Bale gives a tremendous performance as the captain in charge of transporting an ailing Indian chief back to his homeland to die. The film questions brutality on both sides and shows that differences are resolvable but take time and deep understanding. Rosamund Pike plays a settler who’s family is wiped out by comanchees and is the centre of this controversy raised in the film.

Really good use of Indian dialogue. Really good acting. Well worth a watch.

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

A Revisionist Western - Hostiles review by JR

The film is bleak and harrowing and very violent - the only light relief is the extraordinarily beautiful cinematography. At the beginning we are told that Blocker 'has taken more scalps than Sitting Bull himself'. The journey is also Blocker's inner journey to a kind of remorse for his life of killing and perhaps redemption. Unfortunately, the Native American characters are reduced to either murderous savages (the bad ones) or wise sages (the good ones). There are problems with the Rosamund Pike character who is mentally unhinged by the killing of her entire family, but recovers unfeasibly quickly. When she has a chance to return to safety and civilization, she unaccountably rejects it and continues on the trek. The film maker seems to love the violence he decries, and thus undermines the message of the the film.

5 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Terrific Western - Hostiles review by Alphaville

Exquisitely directed, thrilling, thoughtful Western set in the 1890s. Indian-hating officer Christian Bale has to escort old Cheyenne enemy Wes Studi, now a dying man after several years in prison, and his family back to his Montana homeland. They’re joined by Rosamund Pike, whose family has been killed by Comanches in a riveting opening sequence. Who are the hostiles? It’s complicated. Comanches and Cheyennes also hate each other, and there are some bad white men around too.

There are some tense scenes as we become increasingly involved with the disparate group and their journey. Bale’s character especially is a fine construction, balancing a justified hatred for ‘savages’ with great tenderness. Despite this, and plenty of action scenes, the tone is surprisingly elegiac, encompassing a journey in spirit as well as in time and space.

The beautiful Western landscape allows room for all of these complex themes to develop. Don’t expect the usual Western clchés. The plot constantly surprises and is impossible to predict, as is the edge-of-seat climax. Writer/director Scott Cooper’s Hostiles is one of the most multi-layered and exciting Westerns to hit the big screen in a long time. It will stay with you.

3 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Hostiles review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Scott Cooper’s Hostiles takes a more contemplative and deeper path down its familiar trail of old west tales. It could’ve been another standard action picture given the grim opening of Comanches brutally slaughtering an entire family with one left alive. A lesser picture would’ve turned the movie into a revenge piece, where this incident is used as an excuse for the surviving mother or some hired gun to go on a bloody revenge run of bloodily slaughtering Native Americans. But the world isn’t that simple and Hostiles thankfully let its story mosey at an easy rate to better understand the nature of violence in a time when it was so very common.

The mother who has lost her family Rosalee Quaid (Rosamund Pike). Her first thoughts after the slaughter that took away her husband and three daughters are not of revenge but a painful psychosis for the world that doesn’t seem to make sense. She is discovered later at her burnt down home by Captain Joseph J. Blocker (Christian Bale), also struggling to understand the lines that seem to blur. He’s been down the bloodier road, having been a veteran of the Indian Wars where he slaughtered many. His last mission before retirement is given by the Colonel as that of an escort for Cheyenne war chief Yellow Haw. Blocker is reluctant as the last thing he wants to do is serve on the side of the Indians he killed, but maybe this understanding will clear some of the blood from his past and make him see a little something more on his final orders.

With wise and selective words, Hostiles carefully weaves the tapestry of its characters shifting among the cruel Western plains. Pike’s performance is the most powerful for how much fear and depression she embodies. It takes her more than a few hours of silent reflection to get over the death of her family, refusing to accept her baby is dead until she painfully digs a grave with her bare hands as tears stream. Her fears are also going to take a while to get over with how she views Indians, initially sent into a nightmarish shock when she spots the first few she meets after the attacks. These are bitter wounds and it’s interesting to watch how they take a hefty amount of time to heal. Bale’s performance is an understated and understanding one, looking on with gentle listening for having seen that same look of nihilism etched on the face of Rosalee. He could probably spin a few tales of the horrors he saw on the battlefield and yet he doesn’t. His face tells all and a veteran this weary probably wouldn’t delight in sharing such grizzly events.

The journey is met with dangers that never feel overblown as theatrics. They run into Comanches that ambush them but it’s a fight more gritty than thrilling. The climactic showdown is a shootout but not the kind where two men race to their pistols, favoring one where whoever can edge the closest over their cover gets the best shot. The Native Americans are not merely pitched as spiritual ciphers built to impart wisdom on the broken white man but exist as humans just as worn from the war as Blocker. For these surprisingly subtle and true personalities, the film has been praised by the National Congress of American Indians for authentic use of representation and language of the culture.

Cooper’s film is one that could be argued with how effective it is in the characters with their hunt for humanity amid genocide that doesn’t seem to be a heavier focus, but it’s hard to deny the film’s beauty in the setting and performances. If anything, it’s pleasing to have a film with enough patience to let the silence sink in of the weight from the war. Sometimes it comes through almost as well as the somber beauty of the mountains and fields for people who believe they’re in their twilight years.

Help & support

Find answers to frequently asked questions and contact us should you need to

How It Works

See prices and levels and find out how Cinema Paradiso service works

Friends for Films

Invite your friends to join and get free subscription each month