Rent It Follows (2014)

3.3 of 5 from 565 ratings
1h 36min
Rent It Follows Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
After a date and seemingly innocent sexual encounter, 19-year-old Jay is left with an inescapable sense that someone, or something is following her. Jay and her friends team u| to try and find ways to escape the traumatising horrors that are always right behind them.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , Charles Gertner, , , , , , , , Kourtney Bell, Alexyss Spradlin, Mike Lanier,
Directors:
Producers:
Rebecca Green, David Kaplan, Erik Rommesmo, Laura D. Smith
Writers:
David Robert Mitchell
Studio:
Icon
Genres:
Horror, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
29/06/2015
Run Time:
96 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Interview with The Composer Disasterpeace
  • Audio Commentary with Danny Leigh (Film 2015) and Mark Jancovich (Professor of Film and Television Studies, University of East Anglia)
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Gallery
  • Alternative Artwork on Sleeve Reverse
BBFC:
Release Date:
29/06/2015
Run Time:
100 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Interview with The Composer Disasterpeace
  • Audio Commentary with Danny Leigh (Film 2015) and Mark Jancovich (Professor of Film and Television Studies, University of East Anglia)
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Gallery
  • Alternative Artwork on Sleeve Reverse

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Reviews (4) of It Follows

Strap on your chastity belts, kids! - It Follows review by Count Otto Black

Spoiler Alert
05/07/2015

Once again, everybody loves a horror movie that's creepy as opposed to gory, and therefore a bit original, except me. The elephant in the room here is that the long established and weirdly puritanical horror film cliché that teenagers who have sex deserve to die has never previously been represented quite so literally. If you have sex with the wrong person, a totally unexplained ghost will hunt you down and kill you for no reason at all, except presumably that you aren't a virgin.

The concept of an utterly relentless monster that constantly heads straight for you at a slow walking pace and can look like absolutely anyone is a good one, though given that the protagonists know the rules of the game, including the fact that their lives are in imminent danger, I was puzzled that it never occurred to them to commute at regular intervals between the USA and France, permanently stranding the big bad bogeyman at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. I was even more puzzled as to why an invisible creature which had moments earlier been shown to be solid enough to be revealed by having a cloth thrown over it didn't create a clearly visible person-shaped bubble when it was immersed in water, but I suppose that special effect would have been too expensive.

This film owes a vast amount to "The Ring" and its first sequel, right down to a poorly-staged showdown in a swimming-pool, but instead of Japanese people, not all of them teenagers, being randomly killed for doing something seemingly trivial for reasons that make a twisted, Surreal kind of sense, it features American teenagers dying as a punishment for being sexually active, without offering any explanation whatsoever as to why this is happening, as if we should just accept this as right. And there are some horribly mean-spirited moments where sympathetic characters suddenly do morally indefensible things so that the the scriptwriters feel justified in giving them no way out. There's more than a hint of "being less sexually repressed than an ideal Born Again Christian will cause you to die for your sins at the hands of an invisible zombie, and quite right too!" It's got one good idea, but it left a bad taste in my mouth.

5 out of 7 members found this review helpful.

Effective, nail-biting horror - It Follows review by PV

Spoiler Alert
21/07/2015

This low-budget movie is much better than many expensive Hollywood horror movies, most of which leave me cold.

There are jumps and scares, and a great soundtrack reminiscent of Halloween, like the suburban teen plot too.

Teens are stalked by a shape-shifting 'follower' - and can pass on the curse down the line to anyone they have sex one. A neat idea, but like all ideas, not original - it's just like Night of the Demon, that classic black and white film based on an MR James ghost story (as indeed are all Japanese horror films like The Ring).

OK, it's a bit silly in parts, and the first half of the movie is the best: films like this always struggle with an ending because where can they go? Death or Victory - or vague ambiguity, as in most modern films.

I enjoyed this film a lot - it's nail-biting and effective. And the scenes of run-down Detroit make a nice change from the usual LA-based Hollywood horror movies for teens.

Recommended horror film, just the right thing for teens to watch on a dark Friday night...

4 stars.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Poor - It Follows review by CM

Spoiler Alert
24/07/2016

It follows was a let down for me, it just didn't have the qualities of a movie that's meant to leave you leaving the cinema with a sense of awe or amazement. It was so slow moving, just like the actual zombie or whatever it was doing the following. Nothing is explained in this movie, there's too much time spent filming slow stuff that they hadn't time to present a plot or explanation of what the hell was going on. Ok we all know it's a kinda freaky STD unlike any other bacterial infection teenies pick up nowadays but that's all we know. It follows you and it kills you, that's a about the height of it and I can't say why it does that, what its origins are or any background info at all as the film never addresses this. Fail to inform the viewer and fail to enthrall the viewer. The ending is terrible by the way, avoid if you can and go see the conduring 2 instead

1 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

It Follows review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

It Follows may draw from the well of classic 1980’s horror, but it only fishes out the notable elements. The finest features happen to be its tone, lifting the creepy synthesizer soundtrack and dark photography right out of the era. These are inserted not as campy winks, but skillful homages used as ingredients for an original horror story. It’s that extra edge which helps transform a spooky allegory about teen sex into something more engaging and far from the simple traps of commercially viable horror films.

It doesn’t take the obvious or easy route for a concept of ghosts that haunt via sexual transmission. Writer/Director David Robert Mitchell keeps the ghastly nature aloof and intriguing, slowly building the mystery. While the true nature of the magnetic ghosts is revealed, the film takes time to develop some real teenage characters. These are the types that relax in pools on cloudy days and spend nights cozied up to the television watching bad sci-fi movies. They are the easygoing products of the suburbs, quietly falling in love and secretly fooling around in the backseats of cars. But the latest love interest of Jay (Maika Monroe) turns out to be a boy infected with visions of the paranormal. After passing down his condition to her during one romantic night in the car, he briefly explains her new condition. She will start to see ghosts that will slowly start walking towards her, inching closer until they can zip in for the kill. The only known way to get rid of them is to pass this trait onto another through sexual intercourse.

You can probably guess how Hollywood could ruin such a plot. It could turn into a wild sex romp of the teens bickering and feuding, passing the condition back and forth among each other like a game of hot potato with some of them raping each other to avoid death. It could even insert some tasteless jokes about practicing safe sex and how a condom could’ve prevented ghost visions. At its worst, this could’ve been a warped bit of propaganda for abstinence, which it very likely could be for the most gullible of viewers.

But Mitchell has a wickedly crafty hand for creating more of a chill than a bludgeoning message. Part of creating such a real world is Mitchell’s inspiration for the walking ghosts from a nightmare he had at a young age. He utilizes the sexual transmission as a means of passage more than a major allegory. It’s easy enough to see why Mitchell wanted to keep such a script so secret given how he remarked that saying the concept out loud “sounds like the worst thing ever.”

His worries can be put to bed, however, seeing as how he has created one heck of a horror picture with beauty and smarts. It feels very personal and relatable the way there are plenty of moments where the characters are just hanging out without much going on. Jay comes in from the pool and drips a little bit of her wet hair on to her TV-watching friends as a playful joke. There’s a very relaxed tone to these college kids who are quietly enjoying their youth. By that same coin, the terror and dread of looming death is perfectly set by the photography and music. It came as no surprise to discover that Mitchell’s biggest inspirations were the works of George Romero and John Carpenter, encapsulating their methods of building on terror. He turns the decayed areas of Detroit, Michigan into a gorgeous spectacle with wide-angle lenses and dark lighting.

Mitchell also relies on more atmosphere than gore in how most he plays up more genuine thrills than blood. The kills are mostly kept off screen, playing more with your imagination and fears of the following spirits. The opening scene finds one unlucky girl escape to a beach where she speaks her tearful goodbyes over the phone. The film then cuts to morning where her corpse has her legs bent so far back they have snapped off at the bone. Not only does the film leave it up to the audiences to discover what the ghost does, but it leaves it entirely up to the kids to decide how to deal with them. There is no lengthy backstory or spooky old relic they have to track down to lift this curse. They’ll have to use their wits to defeat these ghosts rather than some lame MacGuffin. It may sound a little off that guns are actually effective against these ghosts, but sometimes it’s more engaging to go with something more simple than blessed bullets or ancient artifacts.

It Follows is the moody bit of horror that plays on the best elements of the genre classics, but never winks or ribs with its nods to the greats. There’s been quite a bit of these atmospheric horror films as of late, many of which with a similar parable for sex. But David Robert Mitchell soars over the competition with a film that’s both mesmerizing to watch, thrilling to follow and engaging to be immersed within. Where other horror films struggle with trying to generate scares in little nuggets of jumps and stabbings, It Follows creates one long sense of unease throughout that sticks with you long after the credits. Mitchell may be lifting from several classic horror movies, but the greatest artists steal and he has just raided the Fort Knox of horror films.

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