Rent Relic (2020)

3.0 of 5 from 185 ratings
1h 29min
Rent Relic Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
When elderly mother Edna (Robyn Nevin), inexplicably vanishes, her daughter Kay (Emily Mortimer) and granddaughter Sam (Bella Heathcote) rush to their family's decaying country home. When Edna returns her behaviour is strangely volatile.
Actors:
, , , , , , , Christina O'Neill, , , Ellie Dewhurst, Isabella Clegg, Alex Cotterell, ,
Directors:
Natalie Erika James
Producers:
Jake Gyllenhaal, Riva Marker, Anna McLeish, Sarah Shaw
Writers:
Natalie Erika James, Christian White
Studio:
Signature Entertainment
Genres:
Drama, Horror, New Releases, Thrillers
Countries:
Australia
BBFC:
Release Date:
18/01/2021
Run Time:
89 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
18/01/2021
Run Time:
94 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • London Film Festival 2020 - Natalie Erika James Intro and Q&A hosted by Michael Blyth
  • Interviews
  • 'Relic' Shoot Time Lapse
  • Behind the Scenes: 'Lost' and 'Stunts'

Rent other films like Relic

Reviews (3) of Relic

Psychological horror of intergenerational relationships - Relic review by PD

Spoiler Alert
27/01/2021

Probably not the thing to watch late at night if you live in a dark, creaky old house with your elderly mother, but this highly original piece by Japanese Australian first-timer Natalie Erika James is for the most part a compelling psychological horror. There's terrifying dreams, deeply buried memories of traumas past, plaster infested with creeping black mould and a scrabbling noise in the brickwork, nasty-looking bruises across breastbones and strips of skin that shear away from flesh. But in many ways the movie’s simplest conceit is its most chilling and gives rise to its most impressively scarifying filmmaking: a house as metaphor for the mind of its inhabitant. So when that inhabitant is slowly losing herself to dementia, the house begins to collapse in on itself, a labyrinth of dead ends, foreshortened impossible geometries and doorways that turn into solid walls behind your back. If growing up is often portrayed as realising you can never go home again, here growing old is realising that even as home betrays you, you can never get away from it.

The house's longtime resident is Edna (Robyn Nevin), whose long white hair is a handy indicator of how together she is — neatly pinned back when she’s her spiky self, loose and straggly when she’s become disoriented. It's full of post-it notes bearing reminders that range from the banal, like “take pills,” to the cryptic — like “don’t follow it.” For a time she seems fine, merely irritated to be treated like an invalid, but soon starts to deteriorate, and daughter Kay is faced with tough decisions about her mother’s future while also being troubled by nightmares and noises that send her creeping through darkened hallways at night — a motif that admittedly becomes increasingly unsubtle and rather overused. DP Charlie Sarroff’s photography is terrific though, with patient, observant frames accumulating mood steadily; things that are cheerful become ominous, like the pulsing of Christmas tree lights, and images such as Edna working at her candle art, become inexplicably sinister.

There are times when you can't help thinking that a lot of the women’s anxiety could be dissipated with a couple of 100-watt lightbulbs, and occasionally James overplays her horror-movie hand and we notice the contrivances. But generally, though, the excesses are forgiven due to the cleanly drawn psychologies of the three actors, whose excellent performances neatly draw the intergenerational relationships between grandmother, mother and daughter with great subtlety and insight; we observe the sad truism of how a daughter can deeply love her mother while also despising or fearing the ageing version of her own self that Mum represents. More to come, hopefully, from a talented director.

3 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Age Concern - Relic review by TE

Spoiler Alert
14/02/2021

Yet another 'horror' film that depends almost entirely on darkness as a substitute for more subtle visual and sonic effects. It is often quite a challenge to work out what is going on.

The subject is dementia and the creepy house is used as a clunky metaphor for the unravelling mind of the oldest of the three female leads. However, any serious examination of dementia is scrapped in favour of cheap scare tactics and lingering shots of impenetrable shadows.

There is clearly meant to be some commentary about the mystic bond between grandmother, daughter and granddaughter, but this becomes grimly laughable when the two younger women are forced to beat the living daylights out of the grandmother, before pulling all her hair out and cradling her in a sinister embrace.

There is nothing original here and the only unsettling aspect is the inflated seriousness of the interviews in the disc extras.

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Just about alright - Relic review by KB

Spoiler Alert
15/02/2021

I suppose it was o.k & it just about retained my interest but i wouldn't watch it again or recommend it to anyone .It's quite well done for what it is & it's not too long which was good as about halfway through i was wondering when it was going to end .

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Help & support

Find answers to frequently asked questions and contact us should you need to

How It Works

See prices and levels and find out how Cinema Paradiso service works

Friends for Films

Invite your friends to join and get free subscription each month