Rent Babylon (2022)

3.0 of 5 from 398 ratings
3h 1min
Rent Babylon Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
From Damien Chazelle, 'Babylon' is an original epic set in 1920s Los Angeles led by Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie and Diego Calva, with an ensemble cast including Jovan Adepo, Li Jun Li and Jean Smart. A tale of outsized ambition and outrageous excess, it traces the rise and fall of multiple characters during an era of unbridled decadence and depravity in early Hollywood.
Actors:
, , , J.C. Currais, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Tal Seder,
Directors:
Producers:
Olivia Hamilton, Marc Platt, Matthew Plouffe
Writers:
Damien Chazelle
Others:
Mary Zophres, Justin Hurwitz, Florencia Martin, Anthony Carlino
Studio:
Paramount
Genres:
Comedy, Drama, Music & Musicals
Collections:
Award Winners, BAFTA Nominations Competition 2023, Getting to Know..., Getting to Know: Margot Robbie
Awards:

2023 BAFTA Best Production Design

BBFC:
Release Date:
03/04/2023
Run Time:
181 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English DTS 5.1
Subtitles:
Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/04/2023
Run Time:
189 minutes
Languages:
Brazilian Portuguese DTS 5.1, Canadian French DTS 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, Latin American Spanish DTS 5.1
Subtitles:
Brazilian, Canadian French, Cantonese, Chinese, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Korean, Latin American Spanish, Mandarin, Mandarin-Taiwan, Norwegian, Singapore, Swedish, Thai
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • A Panoramic Canvas Called 'Babylon'
  • The Costumes Of 'Babylon'
  • Scoring 'Babylon'
  • Deleted and Extended Scenes
Disc 1:
This disc includes the main feature
Disc 2:
This disc includes special features
BBFC:
Release Date:
03/04/2023
Run Time:
189 minutes
Languages:
Canadian French DTS 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, Latin American Spanish DTS 5.1
Subtitles:
Canadian French, Cantonese, Chinese, Complex Mandarin, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Korean, Latin American Spanish, Mandarin, Mandarin-Taiwan, Norwegian, Simplified Mandarin, Singapore, Swedish, Thai
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • A Panoramic Canvas Called 'Babylon'
  • The Costumes Of 'Babylon'
  • Scoring 'Babylon'
  • Deleted and Extended Scenes
Disc 1:
This disc includes the main feature
Disc 2:
This disc includes special features (Blu-Ray)

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Reviews (15) of Babylon

Bloated disaster - Babylon review by sb

Spoiler Alert
16/04/2023

FILM & WATCHED Ok so I have seen it……and what a tedious , bloated, self indulgent mess of a movie…… It opens with one of the leads being showered in elephant shit and the film never raises itself above that level…. The whole thing is dialled up to eleven from the opening orgy and keeps it at that pace for 189 minutes with endless exploding bodily functions along the way. There is no coherent plot or narrative with every rags to riches and out the other side cliche in the book. I suppose Robbie is ok in the limited role but Pitt just phones it in….only Calva as Manny emerges with any kind of dignity intact…. The film references Singing in the Rain throughout which only highlights the true awfulness we sit through in comparison. In fact the only good scene is at the end when Manny goes many years later to see Singing and weeps for what might have been….as do we all. It cost $150 million and made half that and when you add in all the marketing costs the true break even figure is $250 so it lost a fortune. It really is just shite - 1/5

12 out of 14 members found this review helpful.

What a mess - Babylon review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
17/04/2023

This bloated, indulgent mess of a film about the early days of Hollywood begins with a chaotic pre-titles sequence that goes on and on and on for so long (a whole half-hour!) that you’re willing it to end. Enough already. We get it. Move on. It’s so repetitive it may well alienate you for the next 2½ hours… not that you’re likely to last that long anyway. It’s shot in a tiresome overexcited-student-trying-too-hard kind of way that never overcomes the emptiness of the content, with barely any character among the ensemble cast of caricatures to care about. Not even Brad Pitt, normally a reliable chooser of roles, can salvage anything worthwhile here. Hint: even if you watch this out of curiosity, best keep the remote within arms’ reach.

11 out of 12 members found this review helpful.

Overstuffed and all over the place - Babylon review by LC

Spoiler Alert
21/04/2023

Elements of this film work to an extent, or are at least pleasing to look at, with Brad Pitt's story strand as a silent movie star overtaken by the talkies probably coming out the best. However, taken as a whole, this is an overlong, over-ambitious mess of a film. The situations and characters feel so unnaturalistic and over-the-top that it's hard to feel any emotional connection, the tone is all over the place (the extended sequence with Tobey Maguire in particular feels like it's from a different film altogether), and the bloated narrative takes far too long to get anywhere. There are some interesting bits here worth watching, but compared to the same filmmaker's tightly controlled masterpiece 'Whiplash' this feels like a case of an artist given way too much money and freedom, and stumbling badly.

5 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Babylon review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Babylon is a chaotic movie that takes the wildest elements of Damien Chazelle’s filmmaking and dials it up to 11. It’s a bold, brash, and musically driven showcase of old Hollywood’s glamorous allure and grotesque darkness. It’s a film that can highlight the fun of a celebrity party yet still not shy away from aspects of shattered relationships, dead hookers, and elephant poop that peppers the party. And that’s just in the first five minutes. Wait until you see the wild sights provided by Tobey Maguire as a creepy mobster.

The film starts in the 1920s when filmmaking made you feel immortal and ends in the 1950s, when sound and color changed everything. During those party days, we follow a few troubled yet hopeful dreamers. Nellie (Margot Robbie) is a bombshell who parties so hard at the biggest events that she ends up with an acting gig. Manny (Diego Calva) is an assistant who is timid at first but works his way right into the graces of working alongside filmmakers. Manny, in particular, gets his big break from the acclaimed yet drunk and disloyal actor Jack Conrad (Brad Pitt). He can act in epics easily for the silent era but fumbles hard when his voice needs to be recorded.

What follows is the rise and fall of the many careers of those involved in cinema's progress. Manny goes from the seat-of-his-pants assistant who races through traffic to deliver a replacement camera to deciding which films to greenlight. Nellie goes from lying in parties to acting her way into the big leagues, being recognized as a sexy actor in many scandalous pictures. Jack lavishes in the vice of it all, appreciating the booze and wives as they come with acting gigs that feel so easy he can have a hefty portion of drinks before delivering his big romantic scene for a war epic.

We also follow a few supporting players who struggle to maintain their presence in Hollywood. Sidney Palmer (Jovan Adepo) is a jazz trumpeter who progressively moves up from being a player at parties to a star in movie orchestras, albeit forced into some uncomfortable racist situations on and off the sets. Lady Fay Zhu (Li Jun Li) is a lesbian cabaret singer who knows how to play the game well enough that she can go fairly far in show business, while Jack merely sinks with the advent of sound. Elinor St. John (Jean Smart) is the most sage of movie writers who is aware of her career’s twilight, the very mortality of the industry figures, and the immortality of movies themselves.

The film gets playful with its satirization of Hollywood and moviemaking, existing between a love letter and a death threat. There are inspiring passages from Manny and Nellie about how they feel you can live forever in movies. Later, there will be a savage commentary on the technical aspects of movies adopting sound. Jack questions why anybody would want sound in movies while we, the audience, listen to someone pooping loudly in a toilet stall. This knowing nature of Pandora’s box is filmmaking, and director Damien Chazelle wields well.

Chazelle crowds the screen with an onslaught of guest stars in wild roles to better illustrate this dizzying allure of cinema. This includes Katherine Waterston as a stuffy stage actress who criticizes cinema to Spike Jonze as an easily aggravated German director. Chazelle also brings back composer Justin Hurwitz to compose a loud, vibrant, and unforgettable soundtrack. I can’t stop listening to the masterpiece jazz number Voodoo Mama. And, wow, the visually erratic finale to this film is so experimental and unhinged in trying to present an all-encompassing aspect of cinema’s primordial beginnings, simplistic elements, and eye-popping future.

Babylon is not exactly one of those must-watch films you recommend to everyone, but it’s my fast-paced satire overflowing with trippy odes and wild storytelling. Everything from the issues of filming with sound from the first time to sitting in a theater after realizing how the sausage is made makes for unforgettable and wondrous moments. There’s a freeing nature to it all that makes one loves movies all the more when embracing their hideous side. This is my kinda happening and it freaks me out so good.

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