Rent The King's Man (2021)

3.0 of 5 from 390 ratings
2h 5min
Rent The King's Man (aka Kingsman: The Great Game) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Set during WWI, 'The King's Man' tells the exhilarating origin story of Kingsman, the world's very first independent intelligence agency. As a collection of history's worst tyrants and criminal masterminds gathers to plot a war to wipe out millions across the globe, one man must race against time to stop them.
Actors:
, , , , , Peter York, , , , , Bevan Viljoen, , , , , , , , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Adam Bohling, David Reid, Matthew Vaughn
Writers:
Matthew Vaughn, Karl Gajdusek, Mark Millar
Aka:
Kingsman: The Great Game
Studio:
20th Century Fox
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Comedy
Collections:
A Few More Screen Princes, A Brief History of Film...
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/02/2022
Run Time:
125 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 2.0, English Dolby Digital 5.1, Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Norwegian, Spanish, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 0 (All)
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/02/2022
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 2.0, English DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1
Subtitles:
Dutch, English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All
Bonus:
  • The King's Man: The Great Game Begins: A Generation Lost, Oxfords and Rogues, All the World's a Stage, Instruments of War, Fortune Favours the Bold, Long Live the Kingsman
  • No Man's Land: Silent Knife Fight Sequence Breakdown
  • Remembrance and Finding Purpose
  • Official Red Band Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/02/2022
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 2.0, English Dolby Atmos, Italian Dolby Digital Plus 7.1
Subtitles:
Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Italian, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 0 (All)
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All

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Reviews (6) of The King's Man

The past is sometime best forgotten. - The King's Man review by KP

Spoiler Alert
04/05/2022

Considering how enjoyable The Kingsman was, the prequel is lackluster.

The first act runs for almost an hour so you need to be willing to stick with it as we learn how the secret society came to be.

The action scenes don't grab and it's almost a relief when the end credits roll.

3 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Misfiring prequel goes woke! - The King's Man review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
12/03/2022

Kingsman goes woke in this disappointing prequel full of anti-colonial and anti-war rhetoric. Prequel? Hardly. It’s like a perverse history lesson that has nothing to do with the first two films in the franchise. Instead the plot has a dull Ralph Fiennes sleep-walking his way through various incidents leading up to and during World War 1.

There’s even a bog-standard sequence about the horrors of trench warfare complete with Wilfrid Owen poem. In complete contrast, and even more misjudged, there’s a risible version of Rasputin’s famously drawn-out death presented as a sort-of Cossack dance. Another astounding misjudgement is an audience-alienating twist half-way through (beware reviews with spoilers). As for the main baddie, he’s nothing but a disgruntled Scotsman whose face we don’t even see until the end.

Matthew Vaughn again directs from his own story, so it’s real shame to find the franchise going so rapidly downhill. Only the climactic cliff-top fight captures the spirit of the original.

3 out of 6 members found this review helpful.

CRAP - The King's Man review by PS

Spoiler Alert
20/05/2022

Crap - doesn`t know if it wants to be a comedy or drama , flits between the two which leaves you bewildered and ending up really not caring about the film. Shoehorns laughable, bizarre and unlikely alternative histories for events leading up to and during WW1 that push the boundaries of credulity to "That`s just stupid" territory. Overly long too.

2 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The King's Man (aka Kingsman: The Great Game) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Yes, this is the prequel to the Kingsman series of over-the-top spy action, but hear this film out. Despite once more being developed by Matthew Vaughn, this picture has very little to do with the previous films. It features no returning characters or younger versions of the modern films, given that it’s set during World War I. It also doesn’t boast the same style of shooting where the action sequences don’t favor that one-shot technique for violent conflict. It feels like such a different film and it’s all the more entertaining for not just settling on the over-the-top nature the saga once favored of exploding heads, blades for legs, robot dogs, humans ground into hamburgers, and Elton John.

First off, you got Ralph Fiennes playing a fascinating man of the world, Orlando Oxford. He’s a former soldier who aims to vow for non-violence, having grown disgusted with death and lost his wife to conflict. Having watched his best partner during a mission of peace, he vows to keep his son Conrad out of war. That may not be an easy task. World War I is on the horizon and Conrad is aiming to fight, even if it means going against the wishes of his father. Orlando, being an expert as both soldier and spy, is called upon by the United Kingdom to do his part. Even though Orlando favors keeping his profession free of violence when he can, that’s a vow he may have to break as the political tensions rise in Europe.

Orlando’s connection with the Kingsman, which seems more like an afterthought, is that he has a network of spies acting as butlers and maids. Two of the finest in this profession are right by his side. Shola (Djimon Hounsou) is a butler but also a skilled close-combat warrior, eager to teach his skills to the high-spirited Conrad. Polly (Gemma Arterton) is the confident maid who not only gives Orlando the best kick-starting to do something but also happens to be handy with a gun, covering the long-range operations. Together, they aim to unravel a secret evil organization that is instigating World War I and manipulating it for the desired outcome of the UK falling. Without giving too much away, a sex tape is involved. Well, sex film strip, you know.

Feinnes is a big draw for this picture. He gives this action-adventure a whole lot of dimension beyond just classy style and delivery he does so well. When suffering loss, he turns into a drunken mess. When celebrating his son’s birthday, he’s a cheerful dad boasting a knit sweater. When facing combat, he goes hard with grit. When trying to spy, he remains ever the dapper deceiver. He’s just so irresistible in this picture.

Also stealing a good portion of the screen as Rhys Ifans in the role of Rasputin. He’s playing Rasputin as a member of an evil sect and acts as a black knight for Orlando to best for info. But this is not an ordinary Bond antagonist. This Rasputin is a sexually aggressive, mystic weaving, and a ballet-obsessed madman. His highlight of the film is his duel with Orlando, using Russian ballet moves to kick Orlando’s ass and cut him up with knives. The only way that Orlando can match such craziness in this scene is by committing to a duel without pants. Yes, this is a film where a half-naked Feinnes and a ballet kung-fu Ifans square off and it’s just as wild and exciting as it sounds.

That being said, there’s quite a bit of restraint for a Kingsman movie. The scenes depicting trench warfare in World War I don’t feel as exagerrated or tongue-in-cheek as the other fights. In fact, they’re the darkest part of the picture, loaded with vicious cruelty and brutality. This is later balanced out with Orlando’s climactic battle of the secret villain on a cliffside hideout. The fight that takes place there is both thrilling and impressively shot. I really dug the camera angles that favor the hilt, showing some cleverness to the chaos.

The King’s Man succeeds in not just toppling the other Kingsman movies but being more of its own action-adventure picture that requires no association with the series. The cast is in top form, the action is intensely exciting, and the humor is thankfully kept to fairly low-key absurdities to give off some class. Much like what Rasputing does in his tense conversation with Orlando, this is a film that can have its tart and eat it as well.

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