Rent The Batman (2022)

3.4 of 5 from 701 ratings
2h 49min
Rent The Batman (aka Untitled Batman Reboot) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
A killer targets Gotham's elite, sending The Batman (Robert Pattinson) on an investigation. As evidence mounts, he must forge new relationships, unmask the culprit and bring justice amidst corruption.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Joseph Walker
Directors:
Producers:
Dylan Clark, Matt Reeves
Writers:
Matt Reeves, Peter Craig, Bill Finger, Bob Kane
Others:
Stuart Wilson, Mike Marino, Russell Earl, Dan Lemmon, Anders Langlands, Lee Sandales, Naomi Donne, Mike Fontaine, James Chinlund, Greig Fraser, Dominic Tuohy, Douglas Murray, Andy Nelson, William Files, Zoe Tahir
Aka:
Untitled Batman Reboot
Studio:
Warner
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Drama, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
13/06/2022
Run Time:
169 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Castillian, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Unpacking the Icons: Explore Gotham's heroes and villains through the props and costume details that define them, as well as the consummate craft involved in making their gadgets, weapons and tools
BBFC:
Release Date:
13/06/2022
Run Time:
176 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, Hungarian Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
Subtitles:
Bulgarian, Cantonese, Castillian, Chinese, Complex Mandarin, English Hard of Hearing, Hungarian, Italian Hard of Hearing, Korean, Romanian
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Various
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Vengeance in the Making - A making-of documentary featuring cast and crew
  • Deleted Scenes with director's commentary
  • Anatomy of the Car Chase featuring the Batmobile
  • The Batman: Genesis
  • Becoming Catwoman
  • And more!
BBFC:
Release Date:
13/06/2022
Run Time:
176 minutes
Languages:
Canadian French Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, German Dolby Atmos, German Dolby Digital 5.1, Italian Dolby Atmos, Italian Dolby Digital 5.1, Latin American Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Canadian French, Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French Parisian, German Hard of Hearing, Italian Hard of Hearing, Latin American Spanish, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B

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Reviews (9) of The Batman

Dismal, dull and dreary - The Batman review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
03/08/2022

Batman noir. Literally. It’s shot almost entirely in darkness for the whole nearly 3hrs. All the characters are expressionless, especially Batman himself (Robert Pattinson – normally watchable but here just a lifeless caricature). Everyone speaks slowly and earnestly in sleep-inducing monotones. The brief action set-pieces are ruined by the overall dismal pall of the film, all excitement drained out of them.

You want it to be an involving antidote to kiddy superhero cgi-fests, but the whole film has had the life squeezed out of it. The slow-paced plot goes nowhere fast and you’ll soon tire of the monotonous talking heads. There’s even a morose score to make the whole enterprise even more soporific as your eyes glaze over at the darkened screen. It’s as though the wrong choices were made at every level. Could no-one tell the filmmakers they were making a dud and liven it up a tad? Such a disappointment.

6 out of 9 members found this review helpful.

Dark New Batman Film - The Batman review by GI

Spoiler Alert
12/03/2022

A dark, thriller styled new take on Batman with inspired casting of Robert Pattinson as the titular avenger. He's really good in the role from playing Bruce Wayne as a sort of rock star type recluse to the pumped up Batman, roaming the murky, rain drenched streets of Gotham City in the night time, claiming to anyone he deals justice too that he represents 'vengeance'. The film continues the visual styling that Christopher Nolan brought to his 'Dark Knight' trilogy and whilst this new film doesn't match the originality of those films it has a lot going for it. The story is a mystery, with a serial killer on the loose murdering the city's dignitaries claiming they were all corrupt, in this regard there's story and visual elements of Se7en (1995) at play here, he also keeps leaving clues/messages at the crime scenes for The Batman. There's some great set pieces and whilst the film is quite long it seems to fit it's time well and doesn't resort to a giant punch up at the end like the Marvel films tend to do. Director and writer Matt Reeves has managed very cleverly to bring in key characters from the franchise including Catwoman (Zoë Kravitz), Riddler (Paul Dano) and Penguin (Colin Farrell - under heavy prosthetics). Andy Serkis as Alfred the butler is a little underused but does have 3 or 4 key scenes and the ever dependable Jeffrey Wright is Gordon the future commissioner of police. None of these characters is how you'd expect them to look or behave giving the film a fresh take on the franchise. There is the slight issue of having to tell the Batman's backstory which we've all seen in other films but it is wrapped up here in the film's central mystery plot so overall it works and for the most part feels fresh. Definitely a film to enjoy on a big screen as it's spectacular and atmospheric. 

4 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Well disappointed - The Batman review by CS

Spoiler Alert
16/08/2022

Can someone explain to me all the way batman was being taken to the police station from the church after the explosion, why no one tried to remove his mask?

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The Batman (aka Untitled Batman Reboot) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Everybody knows Batman. Movie audiences have had his origin story retold three times since 1989. They’re aware of most of his villains, ranging from the maddening nature of The Joker to the pathos of Two-Face. So with another Batman reboot, there is a lot of recapping we don’t need. We know Batman lost his parents as a kid in a dark alley, we know he doesn’t use guns, we know he’s the night, and we know he considers himself the vigilante Gotham City needs. Thankfully, director Matt Reeves is knowing enough of Batman to do far more than just retell the same story yet again.

What makes this movie work is that it doesn’t start from origins nor does it establish a fully realized Batman. Bruce Wayne, this time played by Robert Pattinson, is currently in year two of his vigilante identity. And it’s not going well. He’s honest in his assessment of Gotham City and that crime hasn’t gone down since he has taken to the streets under cover of darkness. More importantly, his presence isn’t making a difference. He knocks out a gang that attempts to hurt a victim and the victim is still terrified that Batman may also beat him up. It’s not a funny punchline of an error on the saved civilian; it’s a real point of reflection for the character.

Batman will have to look more into himself when handling the biggest case among the Gotham City Police Department. Important political figures from Gotham are turning up murdered with clues left specifically for Batman. The clues are coming from the elusive Riddler (Paul Dano) and his messages are certainly cryptic enough that it’ll take some time to decipher everything. Slowly, a bigger plot of corruption that has proceeded for decades is unearthed and Batman’s mission becomes far more complex than bringing Riddler to justice.

There are a few allies Batman has but they’re not as there for him on an internal level. The trusty butler Alfred (Andy Serkis) may be there to help Bruce organize his schedule and suits but he’s also harboring some guilt for the past. James Gordon (Jeffrey Wright) works alongside Batman but their relationship is strictly business, where all their talk is about where the Riddler will strike next.

The one person who gets the closest to understanding and unearthing the issues of Bruce is Selina Kyle (Zoe Kravitz), better known as Catwoman. If you were hoping she’d don a Catwoman outfit for this picture, you’re kinda outta luck considering that Reeves is clearly leaning towards the more relatable detective movie route than the fantastical and silly. She does still have that will-they-won’t-they romance with Batman as the two struggle with their concepts of justice. And since Selina is already bound by vengeance.

Consider how the film also treats The Penguin (Colin Farrell) less like the pudgy monster and more as the mobster businessman of Oswald Cobblepot. He runs the Iceberg Lounge as the seedy criminal hangout it was usually known for in the comics and various animated series and films. Farrell’s transformation into a grotesque mobster is flawless but his performance is also a major highlight.

I also really dug Paul Dano’s approach to The Riddler as a more unhinged person. He will often sing and screech in ways that feel unnerving and common from someone losing their mind more than being a master of puzzles. It’s a unique surprise as well considering that his character spends most of the film hidden behind a mask and voice changer.

The performances all around are great but Pattinson particularly shines since this script requires a lot from him and not just physically. Batman is presented less like an enigma and more as a vigilante who deserves to be questioned. Bruce, dedicated to learning from his mistakes, makes some dark discoveries about his past and his own concept of justice that he needs to actively rectify. He can’t just zoom off into the sunset in his Batmobile and not answer for anything. He’ll still pull off of a cool car chase with the Batmobile though, in case you’re worried this wasn’t a Batman movie.

And, yes, The Batman is long at nearly three hours but it uses that time well. It throws Batman into a serial killer story as well as a morally questioning tale of what it means to stop corruption and the actions that will lead to curbing crime. Few Batman films ever go this deep, preferring to stay in the muck rather than find a way out of it. Reeves’s film does go rather deep into the inky abyss but becomes all the more refreshing for its rush to the surface. It’s the best Batman movie since Mask of the Phantasm.

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