Rent The Third Secret (1964)

3.4 of 5 from 56 ratings
1h 39min
Rent The Third Secret Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
One of Britain's leading psychiatrists has committed suicide. His teenage daughter (Pamela Franklin) is convinced that her father was murdered - and enlists the help of one of her father's patients, news reporter Alex Stedman (Stephen Boyd) to uncover the truth. As Stedman delves into the lives of his three suspects - a tormented art dealer (Richard Attenborough), a beautiful, lonely woman (Diane Cilento) and one of Britain's most respected judges (Jack Hawkins) - he has to battle with his own, re-emerging psychological terrors - and unravel 'The Third Secret'...
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Robert L. Joseph, Hugh Perceval
Writers:
Robert L. Joseph
Studio:
Odeon Entertainment
Genres:
British Films, Classics, Drama, Thrillers
Countries:
UK
BBFC:
Release Date:
24/09/2012
Run Time:
99 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
B & W
Bonus:
  • Original Theatrical Trailer
  • Stills Gallery
  • Best of British Trailers and Booklet Notes
BBFC:
Release Date:
25/02/2019
Run Time:
103 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.35:1
Colour:
B & W
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Audio commentary with film historians Dean Brandum and Eloise Ross
  • The BEHP Interview with Charles Crichton (1988, 103 mins): archival audio recording, made as part of the British Entertainment History Project, featuring the acclaimed director in conversation with Sidney Cole
  • The BEHP Interview with Douglas Slocombe - Part One, The Early Years (1988, 103 mins): archival audio recording with renowned cinematographer Douglas Slocombe
  • Crichton on Crichton (2019, 8 mins): a personal account by third assistant director David Crichton of working on his father's film
  • An Unconscionable Thing (2019, 5 mins): second assistant director Kits Browning recalls the making of The Third Secret Mr Slocombe's Mattress (2019, 7 mins): focus puller Robin Vidgeon discusses the work of Douglas Slocombe
  • Lost Soids (2019, 23 mins): an in-depth appreciation by author and film historian Neil Sinyard Isolated music and effects track
  • Original Theatrical Trailer
  • Image Galleries: extensive on-set and promotional photography, including rare colour imagery New and improved English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing
  • World premiere on Blu-ray

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Reviews (1) of The Third Secret

"A Delacroix in the Bathroom?" - The Third Secret review by CH

Spoiler Alert
31/12/2019

Such lines occur frequently in this London-set film (1964), much it taking place beside a low-tide Thames. "There's enough junk here for a two-year calendar!" "There are few masterpieces in the world - but there are many millionaires." And these lines are only in the scenes with an extraordinary turn by Richard Attenborough as a gallery owner and himself an anguished painter of calm scenes (with a young Judi Dench as secretary). He has been visited by Stephen Boyd, an American television broadcaster based in London and esteemed by the nation as a rock-steady commentator. In fact, he and Attenborough shared a widowed psychiatrist, who dies, an apparent suicide, in the opening scence with an enigmatic whisper to the housekeeper.

The psychiatrist's fourteen-year-old daughter - a remarkable performance by Pamela Franklin - is certain that there was foul play, and enlists Boyd's help. This sounds preposterous but the acting carries all with it. Elements of the customary procedural tale are there, but this is a film notable less for adroit plot turns (a fine script by Robert Joseph) than its filming: director Charles Crichton owes much to the often deep-focus cinematography of the ever-reliable Douglas Slocombe. Even small rooms assume epic proportions, with faces in half-shadows redolent of the With the Beatles cover (as with that photograph, the film would not have worked in colour).

Dream, nightmare and reality overlap, with an emphasis on chalked messages upon Thameside walls, where also stands, or rather sits, a statue of Hans Christian Andersen, who has a bearing on events.

If all this sounds rich (in both senses of the word), it is but a small part of a film which also, at one fraught moment, brings allegation of Lolita-like situations, one of them upon a four-poster bed.

Say no more.

It is a continually unsettling film, not least with something almost unspoken, if not unspeakable, about the past in the life of a Judge - Jack Hawkins, no less: he unbuttons, literally and metaphorically, after sitting through another day in the life of a detailed industrial-espionage case.

Why is this film not better known? Give it a whirl, and you will be sure to spread the word. And, meanwhile, word is that a strand of the plot, with Patricia Neal, was cut after filming. That would have made it too long, but would be fascinating to see if the footage survives somewhere. All too often Crichton is mentioned for a late-career return to cinema with A Fish Called Wanda. Make no mistake, The Third Secret us far better.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

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