Rent Vampir Cuadecuc (1970)

3.3 of 5 from 66 ratings
1h 6min
Rent Vampir Cuadecuc (aka Cuadecuc, Vampir) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Made in Spain during General Franco's rule, Pere Portabella's extraordinary 'Vampir Cuadecuc' was filmed on the set of Jess Franco's shocker El Conde Dracula (Count Dracula) starring Christopher Lee, Herbert Lom and the exquisite Soledad Miranda. Filmed in stark, heavily grained black and white, this atmospheric and experimental 'making of' documentary transforms the myth of the vampire into a powerful metaphor for bloodthirsty fascism, with Dracuia as the dictator who feeds on his people. Dispensing almost entirely with dialogue, Portabella relies on an abstract, fabulously idiosyncratic soundscape created by renowned Catalan artist and musician Carles Santos for its unearthly effect.
Banned after completion, Vampir Cuadecuc remains a provocative, subversive and surreal experience.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , ,
Directors:
Writers:
Joan Brossa, Pere Portabella
Aka:
Cuadecuc, Vampir
Studio:
SECOND RUN DVD
Genres:
Documentary, Horror, Special Interest
Countries:
Spain, Documentary, Horror, Special Interest
BBFC:
Release Date:
09/10/2017
Run Time:
66 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
B & W
Bonus:
  • Newly filmed, exclusive interview with Pere Portabella
  • Portabella's experimental short films made with the film's composer Carles Santos - La Tempesta (2003) and No al No (2006)
  • Newly filmed, exclusive appreciation of the film by writer and BFI curator William Fowler
BBFC:
Release Date:
09/10/2017
Run Time:
69 minutes
Languages:
English LPCM Mono
Subtitles:
None
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
B & W
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All
Bonus:
  • Newly filmed, exclusive interview with Pere Portabella
  • Portabella's experimental short films made with the film's composer Carles Santos - La Tempesta (2003) and No al No (2006)
  • Newly filmed, exclusive appreciation of the film by writer and BFI curator William Fowler

Rent other films like Vampir Cuadecuc

Reviews (2) of Vampir Cuadecuc

Spoilers follow ... - Vampir Cuadecuc review by NP

Spoiler Alert
03/11/2017

So, what exactly is ‘Vampir Cuadecuc?’ Documentary director Pere Portabella filmed many silent scenes from Jess Franco’s 1970 production ‘El Conde Dracula’, featuring Soledad Miranda, Herbert Lom, Christopher Lee and Franco himself, in stark, heavily grained black and white. There are moments when the characters’ lips move, but there is no dialogue forthcoming. We get a distorted soundtrack of eerie noises, rather than music overlaid throughout, and the result is extremely strange and sinister. Studio lights and sunlight are allowed to distort the imagery and flood moments with light. Interestingly, the story – which loosely follows Franco’s adaption, is punctuated with behind the scenes footage of the cast joking around, or false webbing being applied, the rubber bat in motion at the end of a fishing line and at one point, a speeding modern day train. One scene not featured from ‘El Conde’ is the often-discussed sequence featuring an array of stuffed animals coming to life.

The only dialogue is at the end of the film, with Christopher Lee reading very respectfully Dracula’s death scene from the original novel.

What we have with ‘Vampir Cuadecuc’ is a curiously powerful, abstract experiment, some of which looks very impressive in a noir-ish kind of way, and some of it simply showing actors rehearsing and effects being applied. It reminds me of 1932’s ‘Vampyr’ in that the imagery is stark and sombre and disconnected, but ultimately very moody and atmospheric.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Outtakes from a 'Dracula' movie - Vampir Cuadecuc review by NK

Spoiler Alert
24/07/2021

I like the idea of a film that transforms the myth of the vampire into a powerful metaphor for bloodthirsty fascism, with Dracula as the dictator who feeds on his people. That's certainly a metaphor we can relate to in 21st Century Britain where obscenely wealthy vampiric oligarchs suck huge amounts of money out of the economy into their bloated offshore tax havens, whilst ordinary people suffer cuts to vital services and sink into poverty and destitution. I didn't see that metaphor here though. Franco's censors would have had to have been sensitive to the point of paranoia to see any implied criticism of their government in this footage. It's basically outtakes from the making of the classic Dracula movie, shown in chronological sequence, with either no sound or inappropriate sound, like the Victorian funeral where a jet can be heard passing noisily overhead.

This film might be of a certain specialist interest, but I don't really think it's for general entertainment.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Unlimited films sent to your door, starting at £9.99 a month.