Rent Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. (2023)

3.7 of 5 from 205 ratings
1h 41min
Rent Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
In this long-awaited film adaptation of Judy Blume's classic, groundbreaking novel, eleven-year-old Margaret (Abby Ryder Fortson) is uprooted from her life in New York City to the suburbs of New Jersey, going through the messy and tumultuous throes of puberty with new friends in a new school. She relies on her mother, Barbara (Rachel McAdams), who is also struggling to adjust to life outside the big city, and her adoring grandmother, Sylvia (Kathy Bates). A timeless coming-of-age story, 'Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret.' sparkles with insightful humour while candidly exploring life's biggest questions.
Actors:
, , , , , Amari Alexis Price, , , , Landon S. Baxter, Mackenzie Joy Potter, , Mike Platarote Jr., , Simms May, , , Isol Young, ,
Directors:
Kelly Fremon Craig
Producers:
Julie Ansell, Judy Blume, Amy Brooks, James L. Brooks, Kelly Fremon Craig, Aldric La'auli Porter, Richard Sakai
Writers:
Judy Blume, Kelly Fremon Craig
Studio:
Lionsgate Films
Genres:
Children & Family, Comedy, Drama
BBFC:
Release Date:
07/08/2023
Run Time:
101 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Finally That Time: Making Margaret
  • Are You There Margaret? It's Me, Judy
  • The Secret Crew Club: Margaret and Friends
  • Bringing the Period to Life: Designing Margaret
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Roundtable Discussion
  • Theatrical Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
07/08/2023
Run Time:
105 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description, English Dolby Atmos
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Finally That Time: Making Margaret
  • Are You There Margaret? It's Me, Judy
  • The Secret Crew Club: Margaret and Friends
  • Bringing the Period to Life: Designing Margaret
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Roundtable Discussion
  • Theatrical Trailer

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Reviews (5) of Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret.

Fantastic feel-good film - Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. review by giantrolo

Spoiler Alert
21/09/2023

A funny coming-of-age story about Margaret, who goes on an exciting journey to find her faith. Great performances from the entire cast, especially Kathy Bates as the Jewish grandma! Definitely recommended.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Wonderful for teens ! - Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. review by CS

Spoiler Alert
09/10/2023

This movie is a very watchable teen movie, especially for girls. It outlines all aspects of growing up,

street cred and the changes of the human body during 'teen years'. Very funny in places & informative

with a good storyline. Sadly, had nothing like this when I was growing up !

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Dated and saccharine - Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. review by JR

Spoiler Alert
06/02/2024

Writing as a teenage girl in the seventies, I found little in this film that chimed with me. It seems when the family moved from New York city, they moved into the nineteen fifties where feminism is an unknown concept. The girls are obsessed with wanting breasts and periods - whereas most of us were hoping for as much time as possible before the loss of freedom that the changes of puberty bring. The mother seems underwritten and just a 'ray of sunshine' with little complexity. Kathy Bates is the best thing about the film.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Judy Blume blazed a trail for women with the blunt coming-of-age drama in her celebrated novel Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. It hasn’t hit the big screen before, but in an age where women’s bodily rights are becoming routinely violated and stripped away, a film like this feels needed now more than ever. Even for being placed in a dated setting, there’s an undeniable charm and sublime sensation of freedom that can be felt in this film.

The film follows the developing tween Margaret Simon (Abby Ryder Fortson) and her quest to learn more about herself. Born from a couple with Christian and Jewish backgrounds, Margaret didn't know of religion with her agnostic parents while growing up in the 1970s. Having moved to New Jersey, she is intimidated by her new school. She forms a bond with some new friends, but the new club they establish requires a bra, which Margaret doesn't have much experience buying, let alone wearing. This leads to awkward yet essential conversations with her mother, reflecting how much times have changed.

Aside from making friends, Margaret’s goal is to learn more about religion, opting to attend church and temple. This is a grand delight for her eccentric grandmother Sylvia (Kathy Bates), but also concerning for her parents (Rachel McAdams, Benny Safdie), who had to deal with the religious split between their families. Through all this, Margaret tries to come to grips with her spirituality, which also happens to coincide with getting used to getting her period. As she soon learns, growing up is an act you can’t wholly prepare for, where merely stuffing a bra won’t suffice. For Margaret, these are the most eye-opening and important days of her life and it’s all approached with the open nature of jotting down all your sensational feelings in a diary.

This type of earnest comedy is so adorably hilarious for being highly relatable. A slew of moms will undoubtedly watch this film with a nod that accompanies each laugh. What makes the film work is that it doesn’t attempt to overly exaggerate or downplay the elements that made the book so strong. The topics of sex, religion, and menstruation are not off the table for trying to depict a frank version of growing up that isn’t a flowery or softened picture. But perhaps the most sobering moment of the story is watching Margaret view her parents as people who might not have all the answers and still be unsure of themselves. Having that moment of realization while better being able to connect with the previous generation is such a joyous sensation, and it's treated in this film with not only a sense of relatability but a tender nature of trying to ensure that no topic is off-limits for kids still trying to figure out this weird world of ours.

Of course, the most entertaining aspect of this story is that Margaret is a fully realized character. She doesn’t feel like a prop to provide a narrative on top of talking about the female body and spirit. She has a real existential crisis over how she forms her path of faith with the rocky road presented before her. She has moments where she’s underwhelmed by attending temple and later displays a lack of faith in god by bringing up aspects of theodicy. Her plight is relatable for any age, and it’s fascinating to see a film that treats tween girls like human beings with complex thoughts and feelings instead of simplistic ciphers of childhood wonder.

Blume’s book was considered highly controversial for its time, and it’s sad to say that in this current age, it might be regarded as just as prone to being banned, considering the resurgence of banned books. And, yet, that’s what makes this movie feel all the more necessary and inspiring. It’s perfectly paced with just the right tone to be an intelligent and comedic film that makes you feel good to be alive and experience all life's unique aspects. That’s the sensation I got from the movie and I can only fathom how much more profound it will be for women who find so much more of themselves within Margaret and her struggle.

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