Rent Crazy Rich Asians (2018)

3.1 of 5 from 438 ratings
1h 56min
Rent Crazy Rich Asians Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Based on Kevin Kwan's best-selling novel, "Crazy Rich Asians" follows New Yorker Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) as she accompanies her longtime boyfriend, Nick Young (Henry Golding), to his best friend's wedding in Singapore and meets Nick's family for the first time. It soon becomes clear that the only thing crazier than love is family.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , Ronny Chieng, , , , , , Fiona Xie, Victoria Loke,
Directors:
Producers:
Nina Jacobson, John Penotti, Brad Simpson
Writers:
Pete Chiarelli, Adele Lim, Kevin Kwan
Studio:
Warner
Genres:
Comedy, Romance
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/01/2019
Run Time:
116 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing, Greek, Icelandic
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • 'Crazy Rich Fun': Join Director Jon M. Chu, novelist Kevin Kwan and the dream team cast of 'Crazy Rich Asians' as they supercharge the book and have crazy rich fun in the exotic locations of Singapore and Malaysia
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/01/2019
Run Time:
120 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, Polish
Subtitles:
Arabic, Cantonese, Chinese, Complex Mandarin, English Hard of Hearing, Hebrew, Hungarian, Icelandic, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Simplified Mandarin, Thai, Turkish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Commentary by Director Jon M. Chu and Novelist Kevin Kwan
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/01/2019
Run Time:
120 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, French
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing, French
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Commentary by Director Jon M. Chu and Novelist Kevin Kwan
  • Crazy Rich Fun
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel

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Reviews (11) of Crazy Rich Asians

Massive disappointment - Crazy Rich Asians review by CS

Spoiler Alert
08/02/2019

Given all the fuss that has been made about this film we were hugely disappointed. While all of its lead characters may be Asian - something embarrassingly rare in Hollywood movies - it needed to be more than a contribution towards representational politics to constitute a good film. There were slight variations and nuances on the traditional rom com - and if it is a put your brain on hold rom com you want then maybe give it a go - but this didn't do enough to make it an engaging watch.

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Crass, crude, frankly racist movie - Crazy Rich Asians review by PV

Spoiler Alert
12/03/2019

First thing to say is this film is NOT multicultural. White (and black) people are, in effect, BANNED from all scenes - even though MANY whites and blacks live and work in China. Can you imagine a UK/US film with parties with ONLY white people? Those who say this is progress are clearly very ignorant or misunderstand the whole point of FAIR representation. Ditto all-black movies.

This film starts with a disgustingly racist scene - racist against white British people that is. According to this race hate movie, a posh London hotel in 1995 would be entirely staffed by bigoted racist nasty-wasty white British men who'd be so racist as to try and turn away a rich Chinese family who had made a reservation. This is pure race hate - and a manufactured lie intended to stir up mockery and hatred of the British (who actually created the most successful part of China - Hong Kong!)

The facts: Hotels in London - yes, even in 1995 - are mostly staffed by foreigners. Posh hotel clients are mostly foreigners too and usually rich Arabs, Africans, Asians. EVEN a century ago, posh hotels welcomed ethnic foreigners from all over the world. The UK never EVER had race laws unlike the USA or indeed China, with it's racist Boxers. That is why Motown musicians have such fond memories of the UK from their early 60s tour - NO racial segregation here and NO blacks using back entrances.

After that disgusting race hate scene, I could not enjoy this movie - despite some funny set pieces. The fact it has a Chinese cast does NOT make racism OK. Ditto all black movies. Take not, Spike Lee.

The worship of ostentatious material wealth here is also stomach-churning. Made me realise why people in the Far East wanted to be communist actually.

And basically it's all a silly Mills and Boon drivel drama for teenage girls anyway.

I actually think the UK/US should now make a movie insulting China and showing Asians as racist bigots, just for the sake of balance.

No stars. In the trash.

3 out of 9 members found this review helpful.

Disappointing - Crazy Rich Asians review by JB

Spoiler Alert
12/03/2019

My wife and I were disappointed with this film. It is not very involving and the characters are two dimensional. The settings were often spectacular but we didn't care enough about the characters or the plot. The final outcome was no surprise at all!

3 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Crazy Rich Asians review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

To label Crazy Rich Asians as a mere breezy romantic comedy with an Asian appeal would be a gross understatement. Here is a film that goes out of its way to be more than a familiar and standard path of guy meets girl with a judgemental family looming. Rarely do romantic comedy come looking so gorgeous, feeling so genuine, and unbelievably funny that the film is almost a throwback to the more decadent love stories of old Hollywood, where meaty stories came with a decadent dressing and infectious charm. It’s not just any date movie; it’s the ultimate date movie, delicious enough to entice even the most jaded towards the genre.

It all starts with the couple of Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) and Nick Young (Henry Golding) being such a genuine pair, she an American-Chinese and he an English-Chinese. They have an undeniable chemistry where it’s clear they’re destined to be together. Standing in their way, however, is Nick’s incredibly wealthy family. They essentially own Singapore and when their family has a wedding, it’s nothing short of the Royal Wedding in terms of theatrics. Rachel doesn’t know about this side of the Young family until she boards the plane bound for Singapore, noticing that Nick has access to first class. The Young family, however, is already well aware of Rachel before she even sets foot on the property, thanks to the snooping family members that gossip about whether or not Rachel is good for the young heir Nick.

Rachel is in for many surprises when she arrives in Singapore. The city itself is a dreamy wonderland of towering skyscrapers, vibrant lights, spacious venues, and the more irresistible of food. Even the airport astounds her for having an aquarium and a movie theater, a far cry from what she’s experienced at JFK. Nick’s family’s home is undeniably the grandest of locations in the country, existing as a golden kingdom with a wondrous garden of rare beauty. And yet the family still finds a way to one-up themselves with one of the most unforgettable wedding ceremonies, complete with grassy seats and an aisle of water for the bride to walk down.

The family is all smiles for Rachel, hiding their true feelings which only come out in whispers and closed doors. While the other girls seem accepting of her, she’s in for a rude bedroom present akin to The Godfather that make their distaste clear. More open with her disapproval is Nick’s strict and refined mother Eleanor Sung-Young (Michelle Yeoh), favoring tradition and family over personal passions. Not keen on the family line being spoiled by American traits, she does her best to gently push away Rachel. And once she does some more snooping into Rachel’s past, she begins to shove.

Helping Rachel find someone to confide in during this trip is her old college pal, the also wealthy Goh Peik Lin, played by a blonde-haired Awkwafina. She is far more than just a supporting role, eating every single scene she occupies with a spoon to be the breakout comedic hit of the movie. Consider that her father is played by the always Ken Jeong and she still manages to topple him for jokes and energy, despite Jeong’s funny line to his kids not eating their chicken nuggets; “There are starving people in America who don’t have any food.” Armed with over-the-top fashion, a rich Southern accent, and an electricity to her behavior that makes her the ultimate friend you’d want to go anywhere with.

Even when armed with more than enough beauty and hilarity to be a great time, Crazy Rich Asian becomes so much more with its unconventional storytelling with the generational and cultural divide. Rather than being a predictable path of Rachel and Nick deciding if they really want to be together, it’s more on Rachel to make the ultimate choice, deciding if its worth it to go against the wishes of Nick’s family to marry him. Nick’s onboard 100% and so it’s up to Rachel to make the tougher choices. And where other romantic comedies descend into harsh pranks and slapstick to get back at the judgy family, Rachel takes the high road of grace and kindness to be savage in her quest for love. All of this combines to make Crazy Rich Asians one of the best movies I’ve seen this summer and a romantic comedy destined to go down as a classic.

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