Rent Diary of the Dead (2007)

2.7 of 5 from 142 ratings
1h 35min
Rent Diary of the Dead Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
In his first independent zombie film in over two decades, George A. Romero returns to ground zero in the history of the living dead. When a group of film students making a horror movie in the woods discovers that the dead have begun to revive, they turn their cameras on the real-life horrors that suddenly confront them, creating a first person diary of their bloody encounters and the disintegration of everything they hold dear.
Actors:
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Directors:
Voiced By:
Wes Craven, Guillermo Del Toro, Stephen King, Simon Pegg, Tom Savini, Quentin Tarantino
Writers:
George A. Romero
Studio:
Optimum
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Horror
BBFC:
Release Date:
30/06/2008
Run Time:
95 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
30/06/2008
Run Time:
95 minutes
Languages:
English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • UK Exclusive Interview from Frightfest 08
  • Commentary with Director, Editor and Director of Photography, Cast Interviews
  • Speak of the Dead: Highlights of Romero's public speaking event in Toronto
  • Master of the Dead: Interview with George A Romero with foreword by producers
  • In-Character profiles
  • Celebrity Voice-overs Featurette
  • You Look Dead: Make Up Featurette
  • A New Spin On Death: Spin VFX Featurette
  • Photography & Design Featurette
  • Shorts: 'The First Week' & 'The Roots'

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Reviews (3) of Diary of the Dead

Lacking bite - Diary of the Dead review by CP Customer

Spoiler Alert
20/09/2008

A disappointing return by Romero to the zombie genre. Here we follow a film crew as they try to get home and the undead begin to rise. It is done in a style made popular by JJ Adams' Cloverfield but thankfully Romero avoids the over use of shaky-cam, so motion sickness is never an issue.

The director has always integerated social commentary with his previous zombie films. Here it is a little too obvious and is not enough to maintain your interest. You do not identify with the characters or their fates at all.

Very much a weak entry in the zombie series.

2 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Second rate zombie movie, - Diary of the Dead review by CP Customer

Spoiler Alert
04/04/2010

This is easily the weakest of George A. Romero's zombie films. Romero's 'Dead' series always have had a B-movie quality about them, but what set them apart from other run of the mill zombie movies was a subtle and clever social commentary ranging from racism to consumerism. The trouble with 'Diary of the Dead' is that like other films in the 'Dead' series it does try to have a social message, one about the rise of 24 hour media, reality TV and the quest for instant fame. The problem is that the social message Romero tries to make is so dumbed down it just comes across as yet another cheap zombie movie, with average special effects, lousy acting and a predicable storyline.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Spoilers follow ... - Diary of the Dead review by NP

Spoiler Alert
08/06/2017

There’s something faintly ludicrous about the opening shots of this ‘found footage’ entrance into George A Romero’s entry into his ‘Living Dead’ series. A live news broadcast is interrupted when corpses in the background come back to half-life and start attacking those around them. To me, found footage works best when you don’t see too much – the characters on screen reacting to something out of the audience’s vision works very well in that style. Fully made-up zombies fit better into a more stylised, ‘professionally filmed’ scenario.

Things don’t improve hugely when we meet a film crew, including actors playing actors playing both in front of, and behind the camera. ‘Hilarity’ ensures when two cast members ‘have to pee’, leaving the rest to view on the news reports how the dead are coming back to life. Amongst the teens, we have a uproariously well-spoken elderly ham Andrew Maxwell (Scott Wentworth) who clearly feels he’s demeaning himself by appearing in the film being made. Whispering, identical horny youngsters, someone (Jason – played by Joshua Close) who films *everything* despite being repeatedly asked not to, posturing, wall-to-wall expletives – all the staples of a teen horror, and by Romero’s standards, BAD. Apart from anything else, the advantages and unique qualities of the archive formula are simply not used here. The ‘story’ doesn’t need to be told in this way, and is just a gimmick. Could it be Romero was seeking financial success by attempting to attract the youth demographic?

It is explained at the beginning that, to make events more frightening, the young film-makers have added incidental music to events – and yet failed to edit out moments when (as is always the way in these things) the cameras start to fail and cut off.

Anyway, as events fail to progress, I am gagging for some cadaverous zombie to limp in and violently dismember people. When they eventually turn up, they are half-hearted, under-made-up and easily dispatched. The alleged good guys remain personality-free, rather a growing band of posers ‘doing what they gotta do’. How did Romero allow this to be made? To spend so much time with these people and for not one of them to effect any kind of personality for the duration is one thing, but when the undead action is as scarce as it is here, it makes for a hugely dull experience.

Happily, the next in the series ‘Survival of the Dead (2009)’ is a huge improvement on this.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

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