Rent Halloween (2018)

3.0 of 5 from 362 ratings
1h 41min
Rent Halloween Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Jamie Lee Curtis returns to her iconic role as Laurie Strode, who comes to her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she narrowly escaped his killing spree on Halloween night four decades ago.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Malek Akkad, Bill Block, Jason Blum
Writers:
Jeff Fradley, Danny McBride
Studio:
Universal Pictures
Genres:
Horror, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
25/02/2019
Run Time:
101 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
Anglicized English Audio Description, English, French
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Hindi, Norwegian, Swedish
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Extended Scenes
  • Back in Haddonfield: Making 'Halloween'
  • The Original Scream Queen
  • The Sound of Fear
  • Journey of the Mask
  • The Legacy of 'Halloween'
BBFC:
Release Date:
25/02/2019
Run Time:
106 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
Anglicized English Audio Description, English, French, Italian, Spanish
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Icelandic, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Extended Scenes
  • Back in Haddonfield: Making 'Halloween'
  • The Original Scream Queen
  • The Sound of Fear
  • Journey of the Mask
  • The Legacy of 'Halloween'
BBFC:
Release Date:
25/02/2019
Run Time:
106 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, French, Hungarian
Subtitles:
Danish, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, Hungarian, Norwegian, Romanian, Swedish
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Extended Scenes
  • Back in Haddonfield: Making 'Halloween'
  • The Original Scream Queen
  • The Sound of Fear
  • Journey of the Mask
  • The Legacy of 'Halloween'

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Reviews (7) of Halloween

Great - Halloween review by sw

Has a feel and sound track to it like the original which adds to the eerie suspense, classic Michael in the background and hiding in the shadows, as well as been proper angry!. More so in this film than the original.

There were lots of great moments and the odd few annoying shout at the tv as to why the characters are making stupid desissions.

If your a horror fan or a Halloween fan then this film is a must watch!

1 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Really enjoyed it - Halloween review by Ms

Old school horror .best horror ive seen in ages !!!! Shouted at TV a number of times need to hide behind a cusion to not see especially old school Halloween music fantastic!!!

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

A missed opportunity - Halloween review by LC

I wanted to like this film more - the idea of a traumatised survivor fully prepared for Michael's inevitable return is a good one, but sadly it's not really explored in any great depth, with far too much time given over to the latest batch of disposable teens rather than Jamie Lee Curtis' character. The film also feels far too predictable and formulaic - rather than giving a breath of fresh-air to the franchise, this feels like any number of previous forgettable sequels. A shame. Works just about as a passable entertainment, but not a film I'll ever need to watch again.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Halloween review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

It’s unfortunate that David Gordon Green’s take on Halloween comes labeled as just Halloween, despite acting as a direct sequel to the 1978 original film. Now in the years to come when one refers to Halloween, I’ll need to specify whether it’s the John Carpenter version (1978), the Rob Zombie version (2007), or the David Gordon Green version. Despite the confusion, it’s such an effectively tense picture that it could come labeled as the better sequel.

Yes, despite the title, this is indeed a continuation of the original story, acting as though the events of the previous sequels more or less never happened. Jamie Lee Curtis returns to the role of Laurie Strode, aged forty years and still terrified of Michael Myers after that fateful and frightening night of killings. Though Myers has been held in captivity at a mental institution without escape for many years, Laurie can’t sleep easy. She has been preparing for his eventual escape, knowing full well that Michael won’t stop his rampage until he is dead. She trains herself with firearms, builds a panic room in her basement, and formats her house to be a trap for any killers wandering inside. And despite all those decades of crazy prep result in the loss of faith from her daughter Karen (Judy Greer) and distance her from her granddaughter Alyson (Andi Matichak), it is about to pay off.

Michael Myers will eventually break out of his containment and it’s back to basics for the silent psychopath. Dark jumpsuit with strong boots? Check. Filthy Halloween mask that looks as though it hasn’t been washed since the 1970s? Check. Suburban neighborhood killing spree with common household tools? Check. Intimidating presence? Double check. He also has a host of victims to assault, from police officers to unlucky mothers to naughty teenagers.

David Gordon Green makes the smart call by loading his version of Halloween up with heaps of atmosphere more than money-shot kills. While Michael Myers does get in a good head-stomping or neck piercing here and there, he also makes simple kills of snapping necks and choking victims to death. But thanks to some clever shooting, lighting, and an oh-so-delicious throwback to Carpenter’s classic score, the mood is all there for the good old-fashioned Halloween vibe before sequels and reboots muddied up the name of Myers.

Green’s film naturally functions as an homage but takes care never to wink too hard. Laurie isn’t the only one who has gotten wiser with time. One teen remarks how the five murders of Myers in the 1970s seems almost quaint. A young kid with a soon-to-be-targeted babysitter is so up on slasher movie logic he makes the smartass calls of when to leave and how to react. There are even some nice and subtle callbacks in the cinematography, as with an alternate take on the climactic shot from the first film. It also avoids the greatest pitfall of trying to decipher Michael's origins and motivations. He is kept as tight-lipped as Laurie and the intrusive nature of the investigating podcasters and an obsessed doctor will receive no concrete answers; only a silent bloodbath amid Michael's heavy breathing.

I can already tell there are a few jaded horror fans that are going to take arms against this Halloween for one specific reason: they don’t find it as scary. And after leagues of horror movies high and low, I, too, admit that Halloween doesn’t quite chill the bones as much as the deeper terror of Hereditary and It Comes At Night. But for being more of a ride of a slasher picture with all the nostalgic details lovingly grafted, it’s hard to deny that Green’s film gets Halloween right and presents about as satisfying of a follow-up film as one could hope for from this franchise.

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