Rent Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

4.0 of 5 from 93 ratings
1h 50min
Rent Mr. Deeds Goes to Town Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
When a small-town idealist Longfellow Deeds (Gary Cooper) goes to New York to collect a $20 million inheritance, he finds romance with wisecracking journalist Babe Bennett (Jean Arthur), becomes the target of ruthless businessmen and relatives, and finally decides to give his fortune away because it's so much trouble.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , John W. Austin, , , , , , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Frank Capra
Writers:
Robert Riskin, Clarence Budington Kelland
Others:
John Livadary
Studio:
Columbia Tristar
Genres:
Classics, Comedy, Drama, Romance
Awards:

1937 Oscar Best Director

BBFC:
Release Date:
04/04/2005
Run Time:
110 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono, French Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono, German Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono, Spanish Dolby Digital 1.0 Mono
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Full Screen 1.33:1 / 4:3
Colour:
B & W
Bonus:
  • Commentary by Frank Capra Jr
BBFC:
Release Date:
15/10/2018
Run Time:
116 minutes
Languages:
English DTS-HD Master Audio 1.0, French Dolby Digital 1.0, German Dolby Digital 1.0, Portuguese Dolby Digital 1.0, Spanish Dolby Digital 1.0
Subtitles:
Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
B & W
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Commentary by Frank Capra Jr
  • Frank Capra Jr. Remembers...'Mr. Deeds Goes to Town'
  • Vintage Advertising Gallery
  • Original Theatrical Teaser

Rent other films like Mr. Deeds Goes to Town

Reviews (1) of Mr. Deeds Goes to Town

Capra addresses the depression again. - Mr. Deeds Goes to Town review by Steve

Spoiler Alert
02/02/2021

Capra's legendary social comedy gives us an unlikely American hero, a rich man who wants to give all his money away. Longfellow Deeds (Gary Cooper) is an everyman from Smalltown, Anywhere, USA who inherits $20m. While he seems a little eccentric, especially loose on the streets of New York, he has a shrewdness that helps to protect him (for a while) from the chisellers and phoneys of the big city. One of these is fast talking newshound Babe Bennett (Jean Arthur) who squeezes the unwitting Deeds for celebrity scoops. When Deeds learns the girl he loves isn't all she seemed, he gives up and gets dragged into the swamp by the crooked lawyers, get-rich-quick bloodsuckers and vested financial interest.

 At which point of course, Babe realises she has made a big mistake. This was a breakthrough for Jean Arthur on becoming a big comedy star. Gary Cooper underplays as the innocent, tuba playing provincial, a writer of greetings cards who becomes disillusioned by ambient American corruption. As ever, Robert Riskin's amazing dialogue is heavenly, and particularly adroit in voicing Deeds' idiosyncratic native wisdom.    

If there is a weakness, it is that some of the social comment about America in the depression seems like editorialising. Unlike other Capra/Riskin films, it isn't spun beautifully into the weft of the narrative. And so, the last part of the film hardly seems like comedy at all, as they try to convince their audience to find a unified solution to the depression (and by implication, resist the vortex of fascism, which is what Capra's films increasingly fought). At times the film seems as naive as its hero.

 There are many incidental pleasures, such as the unflattering representation of the Algonquin round table on Broadway. It is a story which has gone on to speak to many generations. Its theme, that the innocent will always appear weak and dangerous in the context of corruption is always pertinent. Deeds wins out because Capra can't send his audience home without hope. But there is a very frightening vision of America on show here.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Unlimited films sent to your door, starting at £9.99 a month.