Rent Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets (2014)

3.5 of 5 from 109 ratings
1h 27min
Rent Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
'Pulp' found fame on the world stage in the 1990s with anthems including 'Common People', 'Disco 2000' and 'Babies'. In 2012 they returned to their hometown for what could be their last UK concert. Footage of their phenomenal live show is exclusive to this film and the band also share their thoughts on fame, love, mortality and car maintenance. Director Florian Habicht (Love Story) weaves together these elements with dream-like tableaux featuring the people and city of Sheffield.
Actors:
, , , Candida Doyle, , , Leo Abrahams, Jean Cook, , The Boxettes, , Neo Joshua, Yvette Riby-Williams, , , , Anna May McConnon, Melina Morris, Rio Brookes, Liberty Brown
Directors:
Florian Habicht
Producers:
Alex Boden
Voiced By:
Florian Habicht
Writers:
Jarvis Cocker, Florian Habicht
Studio:
Soda Pictures
Genres:
British Films, Documentary, Music & Musicals, Special Interest
Countries:
UK
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/07/2014
Run Time:
87 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
Bonus:
  • Concert Tracks:
  • I Spy
  • Mis-Shapes
  • Sheffield: Sex City
  • Help The Aged
  • Extended Band Interviews
  • Extended Sheffield Interviews
  • Saskia Cocker Sings "Something Changed"
  • Behind the Scenes
Disc 1:
This disc includes the main feature
Disc 2:
This disc includes bonus concert tracks and special features
BBFC:
Release Date:
14/07/2014
Run Time:
90 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
None
Bonus:
  • Concert Tracks:
  • I Spy
  • Mis-Shapes
  • Sheffield: Sex City
  • Help The Aged
  • Extended Band Interviews
  • Extended Sheffield Interviews
  • Saskia Cocker Sings "Something Changed"
  • Behind the Scenes
Disc 1:
This disc includes the main feature
Disc 2:
This disc includes bonus concert tracks and special features

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Critic review

Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets review by Sophie Dallaway - Cinema Paradiso

After Pulp had reunited in 2012 for a two year tour, they decided to bring it home to celebrate with the glorious common people of their hometown in Sheffield. Pulp: A Film about Life, Death and Supermarkets 2014 is a sensational music documentary that is directed by Florian Habicht, produced by Alex Boden and edited by Peter O’Donoghue.

Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets 2014 gives you a great VIP sensation as you watch the legendary British pop rockers perform onstage, talk backstage and do everything in between. Habicht shadows Jarvis and the gang throughout their journey, leading up to their biggest performance in Pulp’s motherland.

This documentary doesn’t only capture a great sense of nostalgia as you hear the well-known and loved songs they sing; it also highlights how much Pulp has been adored and has continued to be throughout the years as a fantastic band with fun songs and geek chic. This music documentary can only be applauded as Habicht has carefully crafted this 93 minute film into a cocktail of hilarity, endearment, warmth and quirkiness. This perfectly sums up Pulp.

While you probably think this is just another music video to wrap up for your dad for Christmas, guess again; Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets 2014 makes you feel as though you were right on tour with them. Sure, Sheffield isn't the place you would dream of visiting but with the semantic reasoning of it being Pulp’s hometown, you start to see the place through rose tinted glasses and feel a burst of energy as you see the deadpan frontman jumping around on stage at the age of 50.

Pulp: A Film About Life, Death, and Supermarkets 2014 has turned a lot of people’s heads as this fascinating documentary completely explores and justified the true meaning of enjoying life and music. It gives you a feel good attitude and surprisingly enough, like some music documentaries, it doesn't get tiresome. Why? Because Pulp have never conformed to being the ‘jack-the-lad’ kind of guys like the other bands in their era; they have always been individualistic and original and that is why this music film is so incredible. Again, Habicht’s talent allows Sheffield to be seen in a really positive and flattering light. While others may snarl at this, quite a lot will feel proud to be a part of this documentary and be a part of Sheffield.

The last performance on the film is, of course, Common People. It has to be done; this is not one of those ‘typical’ moments because it is allowed to be obvious; it is allowed to be blatant! Common People is a song that has helped shape Pulp and it gives you such a great taste of wistfulness and excitement rolled into one. As the camera glances at the audience throughout, you cannot help but feel a surge of jealous and wish that you had have been there.

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