Rent A Separation (2011)

4.0 of 5 from 353 ratings
1h 57min
Rent A Separation (aka Jodaeiye Nader az Simin) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
The stand-out film of the 2011 Berlin Film Festival and winner of the Golden Bear is a suspenseful and intelligent drama that details the manipulations and confrontations brought into play when a couple's marriage painfully breaks down.
Actors:
, , , , Sarina Farhadi, , Ali-Asghar Shahbazi, , Kimia Hosseini, , Sahabanu Zolghadr, Mohammadhasan Asghari, Shirin Azimiyannezhad, Hamid Dadju, Mohammad Ebrahimian, Samad Farhang, Ali Fattahi, Nafise Ghodrati, Roya Hosseini, Seyyed Jamshid Hosseini
Directors:
Producers:
Asghar Farhadi
Creators:
Peyman Moaadi, Jodaeiye Nader
Writers:
Asghar Farhadi
Others:
Leila Hatami, Peyman Moaadi
Aka:
Jodaeiye Nader az Simin
Studio:
Artificial Eye Film Company Ltd.
Genres:
Drama
Countries:
Iran, Top 100 Films, Drama
Awards:

2012 Oscar Best Foreign Film

2011 Berlinale Golden Bear

2011 Berlinale Silver Bear for Best Actor

2011 Berlinale Silver Bear for Best Actress

BBFC:
Release Date:
05/12/2011
Run Time:
117 minutes
Languages:
Persian
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Interviews with Director Asghar Farhadi and Actress Leila Hatami
  • Theatrical Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
05/12/2011
Run Time:
117 minutes
Languages:
Persian
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Interviews with director Asghar Farhadi and actress Leila Hatami
  • Theatrical trailer

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Reviews (4) of A Separation

For those who like a good story and world cinema, this is A MUST SEE film - A Separation review by TB

Spoiler Alert
10/08/2013

This is a wonderful film. Very intelligently put together using an observant, sensitive, thoughtful script which between director and a superb cast makes the nicely paced 117 minutes engrossing as to how it will end. With the past few years seeing western societies closing off Iran, this film shows a country and society that is slowly changing, which copes by blending modern and traditional values shown through the family at the centre of this film. Five stars!

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

One to watch from a quite brilliant director - A Separation review by DR

Spoiler Alert
17/06/2016

Quite simply one of the best films I have ever seen. I did not know what to expect. It started out as a simple yet touching story and layer on layer was added to produce a film of great complexity touching sad, moving, tragic and thought provoking it draws you in . The director describes it as a detective story shot in a documentary style but without a detective. It will keep you guessing to the end!

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Potent Stuff. - A Separation review by Steve Mason

Spoiler Alert
23/09/2014

Intense drama of a marriage already falling apart, not coping with the stress of a parent's alzheimers, which is then devastated by the repercussions of an accusation of assault. A fascinating insight into another (Iranian) way of life, and of its women in particular. A film that manages to be sensitive and detailed, but eventually, explosive.

1 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

A Separation (aka Jodaeiye Nader az Simin) review by Melissa Orcine - Cinema Paradiso

Nader and Simin are a young couple from Tehran, Iran. They’ve decided to migrate to another country with their 11-year-old daughter Termeh (Sarina Farhadi). But the husband Nader (Peyman Ma’adi) has a change of heart; he decides to stay to care for his Alzheimer’s-plagued father and this forces his wife Simin (Leila Hatami) to file for divorce. Simin still wants to leave but she can only do this with Nader’s consent – something he has no plan of giving away.

‘Nader and Simin: A Separation’ catapults the film’s plot with the divorce, Iranian style. In the film we are given an idea on how the courts work in Iran, mostly they speak before a judge and make their case. A great technique the film utilizes is the cast talking directly to camera when they’re supposed to be speaking to a judge. It’s a direct symbolism – we watch them, hence, we are the judge. From there the film moves forward with another issue at hand. As Nader remains in Iran and cares for his ailing father, he hires a young woman, Razieh (Sareh Bayat).

Unbeknownst to Nader, Razieh is ill-equipped to care for an old man, doubtful of what she must do when Nader’s father wets his trousers. Her husband, the hot-headed Hodjat (Shahab Hossein) is not too privy of his wife being in the same household with a married man, without another man present. But Razieh needs the money for her family and hiding her condition – she’s pregnant – she forges on.

The film is surprisingly very succinct in its message: People in Iran are just like us. They have a divide between the middle-class and the impoverished. They go through marriage dissolutions. They have to care for their elderly. But also, people in Iran are not just like us. They have strong ties with their religion to the point of irrationality. They treat women differently; at times oppressive and backwards. In the end, the film is a domestic-legal drama that speaks much in hushed tones.

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