Rent The King's Speech (2010)

4.0 of 5 from 1154 ratings
1h 53min
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Synopsis:
Following the scandalous abdication of his brother King Edward VIII, Bertie (Colin Firth) who has suffered from debilitating speech impediment all his life, is suddenly crowned King George VI of the United Kingdom. With his country on the brink of war and in desperate need of a leader, his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) seeks out the help of eccentric speech therapist, Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush).
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Iain Canning, Emile Sherman, Gareth Unwin
Creators:
Robert De Niro
Writers:
David Seidler
Others:
Geoffrey Rush, Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Tom Hooper, David Seidler, Alexandre Desplat, Jenny Beavan, Eve Stewart, John Midgley, Lee Walpole, Martin Jensen, Danny Cohen, Judy Farr, Tariq Anwar, Paul Hamblin, Frances Hannon, Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Judy Farr, 127 Hours
Studio:
Momentum
Genres:
British Films, Drama
Countries:
UK
Awards:

2011 BAFTA Best Original Screen Play

2011 BAFTA Best British Film

2011 BAFTA Best Film

2011 BAFTA Best Actor

2011 BAFTA Best Supporting Actor

2011 BAFTA Best Supporting Actress

2011 BAFTA Best Music

2011 Oscar Best Actor

2011 Oscar Best Picture

2011 Oscar Best Director

2011 Oscar Best Original Screen Play

BBFC:
Release Date:
09/05/2011
Run Time:
113 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Commentary with director Tom Hooper
  • An inspirational story of an unlikely friendship – The making of The king's speech
  • An interview with Mark Logue (Co-author of The king's speech: How one man saved the British monarchy)
  • Speeches from the real King George VI
  • Production sketches from Academy Award nominated production designer Eve Stewart
  • Photo gallery including a look behind the scenes
BBFC:
Release Date:
09/05/2011
Run Time:
113 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Commentary with director Tom Hooper
  • An inspirational story of an unlikely friendship – The making of The king's speech
  • An interview with Mark Logue (Co-author of The king's speech: How one man saved the British monarchy)
  • Speeches from the real King George VI
  • Production sketches from Academy Award nominated production designer Eve Stewart
  • Photo gallery including a look behind the scenes

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Reviews (7) of The King's Speech

Unmissable! - The King's Speech review by Colin Taylor

Spoiler Alert

A magnificent film with all round excellent performances.Colin Firth must win the Oscar for this.Is this the first positive portrayal of a stutter ever? You get a strong sense of the Kings agony and discomfort, yet appreciate his bravery to face up to his responsibilities.Unlike some modern films which tend to give characters from the past an emotional range which they didn't and couldn't possess, this is true to life, and shows rather well the growing friendship between KG and his speech therapist. I know that sounds quite unappealing as a premise for a film! Its almost irrelevant that its about the royal family actually- I love the fact that the film is claustrophic with the world outside icy and cold, to reflect his buttoned-up life, and his difficulties in communicating.A film to enjoy again and again.

2 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Excellent film - great entertainment - The King's Speech review by PV

Spoiler Alert

This film is excellent - intelligent, well-acted and beautifully filmed. OK so it's a shame that the Americans only like British films if they're full of royalty and corsets and plummy accents; movies like Shallow Grave and Trainspotting were equally worthy of Oscars. But anyway...

A couple of historical inaccuracies in the mopvie though: the austere Queen Mary was a big reason for Bertie's stutter - the film blames George V his father entirely; also George V was actually 'put down' when on his death bed so his death would be in time for the Sunday papers deadline - they didn't show that. Neither did they show how George VI's speeches were edited (on metal discs) before broadcast to edit out the stuttering bits!

The most irritating thing though is when, half way through, Bertie says 'Excuse me' to the David character. NO NO NO! That is the American usage of the phrase 'excuse me' the British Engloish would have been 'I BEG your pardon?'! They got that SO wrong. No-one is the UK says that now - and certainly wouldn't in the 1930s! Some more language tics of the time would have been good too - and I don't believe the Queen Mother would have behaved as Helena B-C does!

But, all in all, one of the best British films of recent years; Colin Firth gets the accent just right, especially Bertie's R sound, not to mention the huge pressure on the man and his courage (and the courage of all stutterers). Rush is perhaps even better.

The most emotional part of the film though is hearing Chamberlain's declaration of war on Germany. People always forget that if the British had not stood up to Germany, the world would be completely different now - the US would have done a deal with Hitler for sure. Anything that reminds the world of that is good in my opinion.

3 out of 6 members found this review helpful.

Whats Good About British Film - The King's Speech review by D C

Spoiler Alert

Well its been awarded a few gongs and for no other reason than its a great film which has warmed me to a couple who went through their own trying times to come out successful, the film if accurate shows what a genius and totally ordinary exceptional man Lionel Logue was and again in life just goes to prove that you don't always have to be the best educated certificated person to be a success in life what compassion and friendship this man exudes and i should imagine that it would be nice to have Mr Logue around to dinner.

Oh about the film one of the best ive seen and would want to watch again, funny heart warming cringeingly wonderful at times and a feel good factor, it will survive as a period piece and to anyone in the western world who hasn't seen it please do British film at its best...............enjoy

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The King's Speech review by Alyse Garner - Cinema Paradiso

So far 2011 has been quite the year for the British Royal family, and now days after the big wedding the story of Prince William’s ancestor is released on DVD. As many will know the film stunned both audiences and the Academy at this year’s Oscars and BAFTA’s and has been a real point of pride for the UK Film Industry.

The film tells the story of King George VI, known to those close to him as Bertie. The younger of two brothers’ Bertie never expected to find himself head of the country however his elder brother’s choice to marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson finds him thrust into one of the most important and prominent positions in England.

The film’s title refers to one of King George’s most famous moments: 1939’s Declaration of War Speech, which roused the British people upon their entrance into the Second World War. However the majority of the film is spent building up to Bertie’s greatest moment and deals with the impact Bertie’s speech impediment will have upon him.

Having already been subjected to many an impatient and impotent speech therapist Bertie is on the brink of submission when his wife Queen Elizabeth, now affectionately known as the Queen Mum, stumbles across an unorthodox Australian named Lionel Louge who himself suffered with speech difficulties as a child. Having overcome his disability Louge has taken to helping others with their stammers and it is his relationship with the King that drives the narrative of this beautiful Royal drama.

Beginning as a troubled and stubborn man the film displays a touching and tentative performance by Colin Firth as he grows into a strong and confident leader. Firth’s portrayal of the royal was noted by disabled activists for its compassionate and empathetic nature, and it is this that largely makes the film the excellent piece of cinema that it is. The King is shown to be loyal and caring as well as stoic and strong willed:

The film peeks and troughs emotionally, allowing us a privileged insight into the pressures of a King, yet its touching nature never yields; and leaving the theatre I felt almost moved to tears at the sight of Bertie’s triumph. It somehow seems to speak for the British nation as a whole and reminds the rest of the world why we still proudly herald the Crown.

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