Rent Logan (2017)

3.7 of 5 from 1193 ratings
2h 11min
Rent Logan (aka Wolverine 3) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
In the near future, a weary Logan (Hugh Jackman) cares for an ailing Professor X (Patrick Stewart) in a hide out on the Mexican border. But Logan's attempts to hide from the world and his legacy are upended when a young mutant arrives, being pursued by dark forces.
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Lauren Shuler-Donner, Simon Kinberg, Hutch Parker
Writers:
James Mangold, Scott Frank, Michael Green, John Romita Sr., Len Wein, Herb Trimpe, Craig Kyle, Christopher Yost, Mark Millar, Steven McNiven
Aka:
Wolverine 3
Studio:
20th Century Fox
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Top 100 Films, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
10/09/2017
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes with Optional Audio Commentary by Director James Mangold
  • Audio Commenary by Director James Mangold
BBFC:
Release Date:
10/09/2017
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Making Logan
  • Deleted Scenes with Optional Audio Commentary by Director James Mangold
  • Audio Commenary by Director James Mangold
BBFC:
Release Date:
10/07/2017
Run Time:
131 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Audio Commenary by Director James Mangold

Rent other films like Logan

Reviews (17) of Logan

No More Heroes - Logan review by Count Otto Black

Spoiler Alert
11/08/2017

Ever since it was announced that Darren Aronofsky would not after all be allowed to reimagine Batman as a garage mechanic with no cool gadgets whose grimly realistic adventures barely involve him dressing up as a bat at all, and Christopher Nolan was getting the chance to do it his way instead, movie buffs have wondered what that antiheroic superhero film that didn't quite get made would have been like. Well, now they know, because "Logan" is Aronofsky's "Batman: Year Zero" made by a different director and starring a different hero.

Alternatively, it's a superhero version of "The Wrestler", from its weary, scarred, and terminally ill hero hobbling arthritically into battle with nothing keeping him going but a cocktail of booze, drugs, and bloody-minded awareness of his own doomed obsolescence right down to the Johnny Cash song playing over the closing credits. Nobody wears spandex in this movie, except in the drawings we glimpse when Wolverine bitterly complains that very little in the comics portraying his alleged exploits was ever true, while waving a handful of the actual Marvel comics without which the franchise wouldn't have happened in the first place.

Praise has been heaped on Patrick Stewart's unflinchingly realistic portrayal of a ninety-year-old Professor X struggling with Alzheimer's (along with the somewhat less realistic problem of seizures which, because he has telepathic superpowers, are bad news for everybody within several hundred yards), and Hugh Jackman's equally good performance as his troubled but ultimately loving surrogate son, but you know what? This isn't the first film in which such things have been shown. It's just the first movie which took the audience by surprise by including them in a film everyone was expecting to be about men in tights punching robots. Will you enjoy the forthcoming Justice League movie more if it turns out that Superman is dirty and sick and swears a lot while popping pills and coughing up phlegm because that kryptonite gas Batman exposed him to in the previous film gave him cancer? I doubt it.

Yes, this film has two superb central performances from excellent actors giving it all they've got. But were it not for the brilliance of Jackman and Stewart, this would have been a nasty, ugly misfire notable mainly for being so relentlessly and horribly violent that I wondered how it possibly managed to be certified 15. Yes, we do finally get to see, over and over again, what logically ought to happen when a man with huge knives attached to his hands punches bad guys in the head, but I wouldn't exactly call it fun. And I suspect that the decision to show us that even superheroes eventually get old and die has rather a lot to do with the fact that at 49, Hugh Jackman is no longer plausible as a character who isn't supposed to age, and the 77-year-old Sir Patrick Stewart won't be starring in too many more action movies either. Personally I found this a bad, ugly and depressing film based around two performances so good that they almost saved it, and belonged in something far better.

Now that he's hung up Wolverine's claws for good, Hugh Jackman has a great career as a mature character actor ahead of him, and I can see him becoming the kind of star Robert DeNiro used to be. But this isn't a great film. In fact, if you look past those two superb central performances, it's a cynical excuse to kill off an entire branch of the Marvel heroic pantheon who had the misfortune to miss out on being part of Disney's mega-billion-buck Ultimate Cash Cow.

3 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

What a waste of effort! - Logan review by CS

Spoiler Alert
25/10/2017

Yet another comic book film rehashing old themes and going nowhere. This film see Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart as the only members of the old gang left, helping a bunch of new mutants on their road to fame. Te plot is thin, the action, direction, script, editing, virtually everything about this film is average at best! This really comes across as simply a bridge for brushing aside the old crowd and introducing new younger mutants, most likely for a re-hash of the franchise! I found it a bore to watch, with none of the excitement or thrill of previous episodes. For me this has finally killed off the X-Men-Wolverine franchise once and for all!

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Worthy attempt at an adult comic book - Logan review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
22/08/2017

The good news is that at last there’s a Marvel film with an adult vibe – ‘a comic book film aimed at adults,’ as director James Mangold describes it on the commentary. The bad news is that if you haven’t seen previous juvenile X-Men movies you won’t understand the background or what Patrick Stewart’s role is. He and Logan (Hugh Jackman) are old and tired and hang out in the desert away from people who don’t like them. They’re mutants, you see. Charles (Patrick) has seizures that make the screen go all wavy. Logan is also Wolverine and has claws on his knuckles – must have been a bad day at the office when they dreamt that one up.

The film has a melancholy vibe concerned with ageing and mortality but the plot is complete Marvel nonsense. Charles and Logan are on the run with a mute girl who also has claws on her knuckles. Who is this film aimed at? The usual immature fanboys be bored while adults will simply find the mixture of melancholia and slashing silly.

It does get better as it goes along. The backstory becomes less relevant as it turns into a road movie through the deserts of New Mexico, for budget reasons standing-in in for the Badlands of North Dakota. There’s a formidable new baddie to deal with and the boring green-screen special effects of earlier X-Men movies are replaced by more realistic and dramatic confrontations. Nevertheless, it’ s hardly a spoiler to say it all ends in yet another slash-fest.

Best thing about the film? The director’s commentary by James Mangold. It’s almost a masterclass in film direction. He goes through one scene frame by frame, explaining the importance of Point Of View, how it differs in books and films and how it’s the failure to master POV that ruins many films. Watch the film first, then listen and learn.

1 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Logan (aka Wolverine 3) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

I’ve been watching Hugh Jackman play the iconic role of Wolverine for 17 years, but I’ve never seen him play it this well. I didn’t feel much for the character considering his invulnerable healing ability, but now I can feel his pain, both emotionally and physically. It’s the first time that an X-Men film has been able to hit so many high notes. Attribute it to the hard-R violence or the western flavor added in, but this is one of the most excellent superhero pictures since The Dark Knight as a film that can ascend past its comic book origins and the superhero tropes of the day.

Jackman plays the Wolverine of the near-future in a much different light. No longer cocky and headstrong, he’s become a tired and flustered individual, struggling to scrounge up some cash and cope with a poison that’s coursing through his body for years, slowly killing him. With nearly every mutant wiped off the planet due to the quiet involvement of genetic corrections, he struggles to keep a low profile and take care of the ailing Xavier (Patrick Stewart), a once calm and collected force now babbling in nonsense and prone to seizures that could wipe out city blocks. Their relationship has grown bitter with uncertainty about the future, now arguing and shouting at each other with a weariness they have for a mutant-free world. If it weren’t clear this isn’t the PG-13 X-Men when Patrick Stewart starts cursing up a storm, it’s made crystal clear when Logan starts slicing up criminals with gory results.

But then the mute mutant child Laura (Dafne Keen) stumbles into their lives, and there’s a new sensation in the air. Xavier perks up and finds himself hopeful for his kind, while Logan finds himself reluctant to help her reach her destination. But when a private army of an evil genetics corporation is hunting her down, well, an X-Men doesn’t have much choice. Laura isn’t helpless by any means as she has fought her way out of a lab to Logan and is more than willing to move to North Dakota with him. Her mutant power: Invulnerability and the ability to grow claws from her fists, making her Logan’s daughter. She is far more powerful, however, as she doesn’t have the same crippling disease as her clawed counterpart. She also has claws on her feet which Xavier cleverly explains away as a trait found in the females in nature.

Unlike the other X-Men movies, Logan has both a tone and a story that is refreshing and divergent. Taking place mostly in Texas and North Dakota, it’s a western tale, made abundantly clear by both the insertion and quoting of the classic western Shane. The trio of Logan, Xavier, and Laura set off on a road trip through the dusty plains of middle America, slaughtering their way through the cybernetic bad guys tracking them. Cars are ditched/stolen, drinks are had in bars, and the kindness of strangers help them make it through another night. Their goal is simplistic enough to warrant an adventure and bloody fights; there’s no alien invasion to thwart, no mysterious MacGuffin to obtain and no doomsday device to shut off. There’s also no off-screen kills, plot armor for the heroes or simple moments of quips. It’s about as raw and gritty as an X-Men movie may ever be.

Keeping the story simple allows for the most character out of scenes where the characters are not viciously fighting for their lives. There’s a more natural flow in the way that Logan and Xavier argue about everything from taking medication to using the bathroom. The somber moments become much more potent with the added baggage of having known these characters for so long. When the three mutants take in a night at farm family’s home, Xavier tearfully encourages Logan to treasure the quiet and simple life of a family, a life they have long since been denied. The father/daughter dynamic of Logan and Laura does eventually become a moving element, but only after all the bickering and feuding has adequately been drained from their minds and their claws. For a movie that realizes it’s coming to the end of the road of a long legacy, it does its best to squeeze every bit of character out of it.

Just as detailed and subtle is the near-future setting. There are a few technological enhancements from cybernetic hands to driverless trucks, but no towering skyscrapers or laser rifles, feeling very much like a relatable and reasonable future. The past of the X-Men exists in comic book form as a big middle finger to the past X-Men movies, with Wolverine stating that only a fraction of the material is real. The world about the previous X-Men movies is revealed slowly over time and just when vital to the central story. It’s rather remarkable this film can build up such engrossing lore within a short time with such ease as if we’d already lived the many decades that these characters have experienced.

Logan is some kind of miracle. It’s a superhero picture, a western, a road trip, a father/daughter bond, a tutor/mentor end and still has time to be a savagely brutal action picture. It’s the Wolverine I’ve always wanted to see, past the silly plots of fighting men in robot suits and trying to wedge in as many mutants as possible. Mixing intelligent writing with badass action, it’s the send-off that Hugh Jackman rightfully deserves as the longest-running superhero in cinema. And it’s one hell of a finale that won’t soon be forgotten.

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