Rent Doctor Strange (2016)

3.5 of 5 from 908 ratings
1h 50min
Rent Doctor Strange (aka Marvel's Doctor Strange) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
In Marvel's Doctor Strange, a world-famous neurosurgeon seeking a cure finds powerful magic in a mysterious place known as Kamar-Taj - the front line of a battle against unseen dark forces bent on destroying our reality.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , Topo Wresniwiro, , , , , , Adam Pelta-Pauls,
Directors:
Producers:
Kevin Feige
Writers:
Jon Spaihts, Scott Derrickson
Others:
Charles Wood, Stephane Ceretti, Jonathan Fawkner, Paul Corbould, John Bush, Richard Bluff, Jeremy Woodhead, Vincent Cirelli
Aka:
Marvel's Doctor Strange
Studio:
Walt Disney
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Children & Family, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
06/03/2017
Run Time:
110 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, Hindi, Spanish
Subtitles:
Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish
BBFC:
Release Date:
06/03/2017
Run Time:
115 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, Hindi, Spanish
Subtitles:
Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish
Bonus:
  • Play Movie with Intro
  • Featurettes: A Strange Transformation, Strange Company, The Fabric of Reality, Across Time and Space, The Score-cerer Supreme
  • Marvel Studios Phase 3 Exclusive Look
  • Team Thor: Part 2
  • Deleted and Extended Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • Audio Commentary by Director Scott Derrickson
BBFC:
Release Date:
06/03/2017
Run Time:
115 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, Hindi, Spanish
Subtitles:
Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish

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Reviews (12) of Doctor Strange

Strange Days - Doctor Strange review by Count Otto Black

Spoiler Alert

Doctor Strange is one of the most cinematic of superheroes, since his powers have always been far more visually interesting than almost anybody else's; instead of firing a boring old ray or simply punching people, elaborate mandalas leap forth from his hands and have all manner of effects on his foes. And the places he visits in the course of his adventures are downright Surreal.

This movie, one of the best entries so far in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, does not disappoint visually, and Benedict Cumberbatch is excellent as the brilliant but selfish neurosurgeon who learns to be a better man in the course of becoming a very peculiar superhero. If you've seen the abysmal "Green Lantern", you may experience an odd sense of déjà vu, since it's almost a remake; an arrogant and thoroughly unlikeable man goes to a superhero academy where he's given visually interesting powers which he initially struggles with, his instructors bully him until he gets the hang of it, the baddie he fights for most of the film is the dupe of the real Big Bad, who is basically a giant floating satanic space head, and one of his allies is a good guy whom anyone who has read the comics knows will be the bad guy in the sequel. Fortunately, unlike "Green Lantern", they get it right.

Well, almost. If you've seen "Inception", you'll notice that the exact same CGI software developed for that film is in constant use here, and frankly it gets a bit tedious. I don't know what the rules of magic are supposed to be, but it seems that a disproportionate number of spells cause architecture to elaborately rearrange itself, and I can think of more interesting enemies for Doctor Strange to fight than a revolving corridor! Or indeed the villains who cause all those corridors to revolve. Some bloke with minimal backstory whose pact with the Dark Side causes him to develop incredibly seventies eye-makeup, his three nonentity minions, and a weirdly cartoonish hovering head that's supposed to be The Worst Thing Ever? The sequel needs to do better! And talking of the rules of magic, there's no real sense of what Doctor Strange's limitations are. His powers seem to vary from being slightly less useful than having a gun to godlike as the plot requires, and that's very lazy scriptwriting.

On the plus side, the standard of the acting is almost uniformly excellent. Right-on PC criticism has been leveled at the casting of Tilda Swinton as a character who in the comic is both Asian and male, but you know what? The Ancient One as envisaged by Marvel over half a century ago is such a clichéd racial stereotype that portraying him accurately would have been less politically correct than casting a white woman. I notice that nobody's whining about the fact that Mordo being black and not being a baron shows bias against Eastern European aristocrats, but that would make just as much sense. Some people won't be satisfied until James Bond is a disabled Eskimo lesbian. They should be happy that poor old Wong finally has a personality! It's not a truly great film, but it's far better than anything the Official DC Cinematic Universe has given us yet, and Benedict Cumberbatch inhabits the character superbly, making me eager to see what he gets up to next, now that his origin story is over and done with.

Fun thing to watch out for: although, like all Disney films, this one never, ever shows anybody smoking in case that causes the entire audience to rush out and get cancer, Stan Lee is briefly glimpsed reading and thoroughly enjoying a book advocating the use of illegal hallucinogenic drugs. Go figure.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

A Likeable and Enjoyable Family Film to Watch - Doctor Strange review by CS

Spoiler Alert

All these Comic Book movies are starting to get a little bit boring and samey and adding a link at the end of each film to The Avengers, Thor or Iron Man, is really starting to get tedious!

Dr Strange shares many similarities with films such as 'The Green Lantern' and 'Guardians of the Galaxy', the special effects and CGI are very similar, with many themes and much imagery being heavily borrowed from the two! Folding buildings and street scenes has been lifted literally straight from 'Inception' and the character of Dr.Strange himself, is little more than an adult 'Airbender'!

Benedict Cumberbatch brings his usual air of self assurance, arrogance and self interest to the part, but the character shares slightly too much in similarity to Iron Man, in the way that both characters are self absorbed in their own vanity!

The evil entity is straight out of The Green Lantern and this has a little bit of Harry Potter thrown in too. So in all it offers very little which is new or original and treads the usual comic book formula of bad guy vs good guy. What this film does do is to bring all these elements together in a strong and interesting way, so that once the acton starts it really does hold your attention.

All in I found this quite an enjoyable film to watch and thought the special effects were very well done, if not a little cluttered! Some interesting ideas and takes on the magic formula. Not a lot to be said about character development or acting, as the characters end up taking second place to the action.

This could have ended on a high note, which it did, paving the way for more sequels. That was until Thor annoyingly makes an appearance right at the end, leaving the door open for Dr.Strange to join the avengers!

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

A Marvel movie that tries - Doctor Strange review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert

The problem with superhero origin stories is that you know where they’re going. We know Doctor Strange is going to get his powers but have to spend an hour watching him do so while listening to screeds of psychobabble. ‘We never lose our demons,’ intones The Ancient One, ‘we only learn to live above them.’ Yeah, right. To their credit, the writers seem so embarrassed by what they’re having to write for the fanboy audience that they have Doctor Strange mock it.

At least we get more action in the second half, where our Doctor has to face the Dormammu of the Dark Domain. Unfortunately he turns out to be nothing more than a big face in the sky.

Nevertheless, there are redeeming qualities to be found here. To say it’s better than most Marvel movies is to damn with faint praise, but this one does play with issues of time, immortality, evolution and the multiverse. Chiwetel Ejiofor and Mads Mikkelsen are wasted as Strange’s sidekick and enemy, but Benedict Cumberbatch raises the tone of the piece as the doctor. The architecture-bending, gravity-defying special affects are also noteworthy. A chase through an Escher-like spatially-changing New York is a highlight that should have been reserved for the climax.

The bombastic score, highlighting every beat of the film, is as horrendous as in all Marvel films and there’s a coda that augurs ill for a sequel: the Doctor is going to help Thor and his big hammer. Whatever merits can be gleaned from this film, it’s surely all going south from now on.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Doctor Strange (aka Marvel's Doctor Strange) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

The Marvel Cinematic Universe adds sorcerers to its long list of fantasy elements. But this is no mere magic missile show, echoing the likes of Harry Potter. Marvel’s magic is a bit more clever and creative. The sorcerers of Doctor Strange use their abilities to shift gravity, open portals, turn walls into tapestries and skyscrapers into mazes. They’re a little tougher to combat than throwing a shield, blasting some energy or throwing a Hulk fist. A bit more tact is required in dealing with such threats, paving the way for the necessity of Doctor Strange.

The protagonist of Stephen Strange (yes, that’s his real name), played with ease by a smugly intelligent Benedict Cumberbatch, echoes the origins of Iron Man. He’s a cocky neurosurgeon that has become so confident in his life-saving abilities that he’s carved a comfortable lifestyle where he can drive fast cars and be selective of his clients. He’s very similar to Tony Stark, but slightly less smug about his popularity. But he’s forced to rethink his life when a car crash severely damages the nerves in his hand. Spending all his money to cure his hands, he finds himself headed to Nepal for a new solution to regaining the precision of his hands.

Where he seeks medicine, he discovers magic with the sagely Ancient One, portrayed in the MCU as a bald-headed Tilda Swinton. In the comics, the ancient one was a racist stereotype of an Asian sorcerer, so the trade up for a white woman comes across a little progressive than mere whitewashing. Director Scott Derrickson described the casting decision as an unwinnable situation, considering that the mere casting of any Asian would be seen as a controversial move for both the character and the region. A gamble with Tilda, but it pays off greatly with her likable charisma and spirit.

Reluctant to accept her theories on magical dimensions, Strange literally has the knowledge beaten into him when the Ancient One sends him on the ultimate trip, travelling through realities both astral and surreal. That’s all it takes for him to want to sign up for the Ancient One’s school of magic. Even with his hands damaged, Strange takes quite quickly to studying magic with the help of magic student Mordo and librarian Wang, as well as some sink-or-swim exercises. I suppose if he could accomplish brain surgery so easily, magic can’t be that much difficult.

What does end up being difficult is handling the threat of evil sorcerer Kaecilius, played with volcanic mascara by a stone-faced Mad Mikkelson. In what has become a troublesome habit of these Marvel movies, Kaecilius is not exactly a memorable villain, nor is his grand scheme all that unique. He desires eternal life and a god from another dimension can give it to him in exchange for the Earth, via a portal he must assemble. Been there before, seen that before and Doctor Strange offers little new in this arena.

Thankfully, the special effects on display makes Doctor Strange the most visually perfect of the MCU. Every sequence where sorcerers battle each other with magic is a visual feast for the eyes. Cities transform into bizarre displays of shifting perspectives, while cars and people still walk around an M.C. Escher in motion. The columns of buildings turn into meat grinders, buildings turn into tumbling blocks and walls become tapestries of revolving patterns. There’s even an extremely inventive use of magic where the destruction of a city is reversed while still satisfying the requirement for a grand showdown. It was the first time during these Marvel movies where I didn’t mind the abundance of detailed computer graphics as there was originality and creativity behind them.

The only downside is that Doctor Strange has so much cool stuff to show us that it forgets about the characters. They’re all likable enough to enjoy their arcs and their quips, but not nearly developed enough to appreciate the humility learned by Strange, the secretive nature of the Ancient One, the conflict of ethics for Mordo or the frustration of Kaecilius. So many events are skipped over, such as Strange’s training which lasts mere days, to keep the plot on schedule for more magic and more battles. All of their personality falls to the wayside to make way for the gorgeous special effects.

Despite this, I applaud the effort as these special effects do plenty to distract from the rather standard Marvel origins pattern. I’ve seen this story before, but I’ve never SEEN it so beautifully entrancing as Doctor Strange. Magic now exists in the MCU and it’s a most welcomed element that is sure to literally shift the Marvel universe.

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