Rent Hell or High Water (2016)

3.8 of 5 from 752 ratings
1h 38min
Rent Hell or High Water Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
Texas brothers - Toby (Chris Pine), and Tanner (Ben Foster), come together after years divided to rob branches of the bank threatening to foreclose on their family land. Vengeance seems to be theirs, until they find themselves on the radar of Texas Ranger, Marcus (Jeff Bridges) looking for one last grand pursuit on the eve of his retirement. As the brothers plot a final bank heist to complete their scheme, and with the Rangers on their heels, a showdown looms at the crossroads where the values of the Old and New West murderously collide.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Marie A.K. Mcmaster
Directors:
Producers:
Peter Berg, Carla Hacken, Sidney Kimmel, Julie Yorn
Writers:
Taylor Sheridan
Others:
Jake Roberts, Giles Nuttgens
Studio:
StudioCanal
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Drama, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
09/01/2017
Run Time:
98 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • "Enemies Forever: The Characters of Hell or High Water" Featurette
  • "Visualizing the Heart of America" Featurette
  • "Damaged Heroes: The Performances of Hell or High Water" Featurette
  • Red Carpet Premiere
  • Filmmaker Q&A
BBFC:
Release Date:
09/01/2017
Run Time:
103 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • "Enemies Forever: The Characters of Hell or High Water" Featurette
  • "Visualizing the Heart of America" Featurette
  • "Damaged Heroes: The Performances of Hell or High Water" Featurette
  • Red Carpet Premiere
  • Filmmaker Q&A
  • Interview with Director David Mackenzie

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Reviews (11) of Hell or High Water

Intelligent and entertaining tragic modern Western. - Hell or High Water review by PV

Spoiler Alert
26/01/2017

This movie stands out as one of the very best modern Westerns - set in the rust bowl of West Texas (a huge state the size of France) we see at first hand the sort of struggling people who voted for Trump, who often live in poverty without prospects and who are often well and truly shafted by the banks who repossess their homes and farms as part of a deliberate police, it seems.

These people feel betrayed by everyone - all politicians incl Democrats (Hilary take note!), banks, schools, their whole nation, actually. All they have left is their bruised pride backed up with guns.

As one old Indian character makes clear at one point: the white man stole the land from the Indians, and no the banks are stealing it from the white man! The little man is a nothing when the banks think only of their own profits.

This story and the characters are all utterly believable too as the inevitable, almost-Greek tragedy plays out for a bitter-sweet ending in the 'flyover' state of (west) Texas.

I don't think I have watched a film where I sided with the criminals and bank robbers more since Bonnie and Clyde - and you'll be rooting for them too: the film is so clever in achieving that. It's a rare things to achieve.

A truly intelligent film that makes you think and raises some huge issues about what it means to be American today - or to be anything, under the thumb of heartless banks.

It should win Oscars maybe but as it has no black characters probably won't in this diversity-worshipping 'affirmative action' age - but note how many white people are poor in this rustbelt America, and realise how oppressed they are. This movie should be compulsory viewing for anyone who thinks there is any such thing as 'white privilege' (and 'male privilege; too).

4.5 stars rounded up to 5.

5 out of 5 members found this review helpful.

Soft spot for Jeff - Hell or High Water review by NC

Spoiler Alert
26/01/2017

Should be a 3 really. Two Guns or No Country or Old Men prob better, but like Jeff, so a biased 4. Plus seen so much junk of late, is good to be able to up something a bit. If Jeff not in it be a 3 :)

Apparently, whatever problems you get in US, and especially Texas, all you need is a gun. Hit a few elderly people with it, shoot any more active types that are in your way, especially poorly paid security guards, and solve your mortgage problems.

We can go bankrupt, and seek benefits, if available..........think i go with our system !

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Mostly just hell - Hell or High Water review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
13/04/2017

A morally repugnant downer of a movie. Who wants to spend time with two small-town low-life bank robbers to a soundtrack of excruciating country and western drivel? Their excuse is they need to pay off a mortgage to prevent an eviction. The background is the sub-prime financial crisis. They’re really victims, you see. No, they’re not. They’re criminals who terrorise and kill people. Director David Mackenzie thinks he’s blurred the lines between good and bad. No, he hasn’t. On the DVD extras he calls his protagonists ‘damaged heroes’. No, they’re not.

The two robbers have no redeeming features. They’re not even interesting. They have little to say or do. Typical dialogue: ‘You’re f***ng kidding me.’ Oh, they visit a casino. There are some nice shots of the wide-open spaces of West Texas and a weary nostalgia for bygone times that struck a chord with American critics, but there’s less here than meets the eye. When yet another montage to an oh-so-earnest C&W ballad begins you want to put your foot through the screen. It’s what fast forward was invented for.

The only likeable lead character is laconic Sheriff Jeff Bridges, who seems to have strolled in with an array of one-liners from a different and better film. Any interest is packed into the third act when he finally gets to confront the robbers. But then the film peters out again to yet another subtle C&W refrain called ‘Outlaw State of Mind.’ Just in case you haven’t got the gist by now.

0 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Hell or High Water review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Hell or High Water makes its world known in a single shot without saying a word. The camera pans around the parking lot of a bank in West Texas. The town is devoid of most businesses and few cars can be seen in the morning hours. Some graffiti on the wall contains a rant about soldiers not being able to find jobs after coming home. One car arrives early, the occupants waiting for the bank to open with ski-masks and guns. Times are tough and the bank is about to be robbed.

But the two robbing the bank are no mere thieves. They are brothers in crime that have thought through their actions of swiping cash to save a farm. Chris Pine plays the brains of the operation as Toby Howard, a divorced farmer desperately trying to secure a future for his ungrateful children. Ben Foster is the more seasoned thief Tanner Howard, acting more recklessly and favoring thrills over calculated moves. They appear as a mismatched couple, but they’re brought together easily by their sense of family loyalty to avoid the more minute mistakes an amatuer bank robber might make. They’re smart enough to know when to dump a car, where to dump it, which banks to rob from, which time to rob them and how to go about making sure the money is clean.

Despite their smarts, they’re not dealing with average citizens in the region of west Texas. Having grown bitter in a climate of banks shutting down their farms and businesses, they don’t hesitate to open fire on a bank robber. They’re not afraid to shoot off their mouths either as any politically incorrect statement or declaration of violence slips out from their frustrated psyche. One citizen encounters the robbers and questions why they’re robbing banks when they’re not Mexican. Another confesses to law enforcement that if he finds the robbers, he’ll hang them from a tree, reasoning that he’ll get away with it if the cops can’t find the tree.

Upon hearing this statement, old-time Texas Ranger Marcus (Jeff Bridges) simply smiles with his mustache and remarks, “I love West Texas.” He’s seasoned enough at this job to not only have a nose tracking criminals, but enjoy the hunt with his grimacing partner Alberto (Gil Birmingham). The two have an odd relationship in how Marcus keeps slinging indian slurs at Alberto, hoping he’ll return the favor to get a banter going. There’s a genuine sincerity behind every racial jab and jockular ribbing, brilliantly sold by Bridges who doesn’t phone in what could have been a breezily-fitting role. You probably already know he’s a great actor for such a character, but I’ll bet you never knew he was this great. For a man who has grown quite comfortable in the movies with a mustache and a cowboy hat, this is easily one of his best performances.

The story of Hell or High Water is thought out with a great deal of intricacy in how it stages the robberies and paints the robbers as anything but typical. Many expected cliches of points where the scheme could go wrong are narrowly avoided, resulting in a showdown with more surprises than I expected. For two brothers that are polar opposite, they have their heads firmly in check, even when venturing into a casino to change out their money. A lesser movie might have them gamble it all away or have it stolen by an eager hooker. These traps are presented and wisely sideswiped. I also found myself incredibly engrossed in Marcus’ arc, despite him being the old trope of a cop just a few days from retirement.

But what’s most appealing about the movie by far are the elements that appear more as set dressing. The environment of West Texas becomes a character with sweeping dusty plains, rundown towns and plenty of billboards for banks. Not to be outdone, however, are the citizens of West Texas that manage to steal just about every scene. One particular scene worth noting takes place in the diner. Marcus and Alberto settle in for lunch, only to be greeted by the most crabby old waitress ever seen on film. She doesn’t ask you what you want; she asks what you don’t want. What she doesn’t have is fish, a request she sourly turned down after some New Yorker came in to order just that. I’m probably never going to order fish if I go to Texas for fear that this lady will materialize at the table.

Hell or High Water takes a simple story of robbing banks and turns into one of the most complex, thoughtful and charismatic neo-westerns of the decade. Every scene is brimming with Texas charm, be they filled with top-rate actors, impressive supporting characters or just gorgeous landscapes. It’s the type of picture that begs a second viewing, a closer examination and heaps of praise for making a heist picture more deep than it has any right to be.

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