Rent Lion (2016)

4.0 of 5 from 769 ratings
1h 54min
Rent Lion (aka A Long Way Home) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Five-year-old Saroo (Sunny Pawar) gets lost on a train travelling away from his home and family. Frightened and bewildered, he ends up thousands of miles away, in chaotic Kolkata. Somehow he survives living on the streets, escaping all sorts of terrors and close calls in the process, before ending up in an orphanage that is itself not exactly a safe haven. Eventually Saroo is adopted by an Australian couple (Nicole Kidman and David Wenham), and finds love and security as he grows up in Hobart. As an adult, not wanting to hurt his adoptive parents' feelings, Saroo (Dev Patel) suppresses his past, his emotional need for reunification and his hope of ever finding his lost mother and brother.
But a chance meeting with some fellow Indians reawakens his buried yearning. Armed with only a handful of memories and his unwavering determination, Saroo sets out to find his lost family and finally return to his first home.
Actors:
, , , , , , Khushi Solanki, Shankar Nisode, , , , , Rita Boy, Udayshankar Pal, Surojit Das, , , , Keshav Jadhav,
Directors:
Producers:
Iain Canning, Angie Fielder, Emile Sherman
Writers:
Saroo Brierley, Luke Davies
Others:
Luke Davies, Dustin O'Halloran, Hauschka, Greig Fraser
Aka:
A Long Way Home
Studio:
Entertainment In Video
Genres:
Top 100 Films, Drama
Awards:

2017 BAFTA Best Supporting Actor

2017 BAFTA Best Adapted Screen Play

BBFC:
Release Date:
22/05/2017
Run Time:
114 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Trailer
BBFC:
Release Date:
22/05/2017
Run Time:
119 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Featurettes
  • Music Video: SIA - Never Give Up
  • Trailer

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Reviews (16) of Lion

Powerful and true story - Lion review by JO

Spoiler Alert
21/11/2017

I had known nothing about this film before I watched it, except that a number of friends had recommended it. It was compelling from the start, as well as having a very authentic feel. I found it incredibly moving, not necessarily in a tearjerky way, but more deeply than that, reflecting as I was on the movement of children across our globe whether voluntarily in search of different lives, or perhaps under circumstances beyond their control. There are so many little lost travelling boys and girls. It was so powerful to witness this one's story, so well told.

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

A moving true story - Lion review by OTR

Spoiler Alert
25/08/2017

A very good film, well told and well paced. A bit of a tear-jerker at the very end. By the by, people often joke about who has to play them when the film of their life is made; Kidman is flattering in the role but not the right woman; Sheru is also something else again when you see the true characters shown at the close of the film.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Simply stunning - Lion review by TB

Spoiler Alert
07/02/2018

Oh wow, what a film this is!!

Stunning cinematography and a deeply moving true story. Both actors who played the young and old Sarro (Sunny Pawar and Dev Patel) put in sensational performances with Sunny in particular for such a young actor. This film really leaves its mark on you and the footage and words at the end are amazing. A must watch!!

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Lion (aka A Long Way Home) review by Adrijan Arsovski - Cinema Paradiso

Lion is a well-acted, though-provoking, hipster-free tearjerker drama that stays with you long after you’ve watched this film for the first time. Now let’s be blunt: Lion features an impressive cinematography, well thought-out script, and acting like you’ve never seen before from a half-Hindi feature that somehow found its way onto Uncle Sam’s big screen. And despite telling a story that spans over the course of twenty-five years, Lion never, ever feels like it overstays its welcome – an impressive feat to say the least (scorning at you The Revenant!). And where others have failed, Lion succeeds in building an ever-lasting legacy that won’t be forgotten (at least for those who watched the film) as opposed to (mandatory comparison incoming) another well-known feature called Slumdog Millionaire. Now let’s see how it went down.

The film starts with Saroo (wonderfully played by Sunny Pawar), who gets lost after he and his brother leave their village in order to do a job of some sorts. Unfortunately, young Saroo cannot find his way back and gets lost in the crowded streets of India. From here thereon, the film follows Saroo in his own personal Odyssey as he tries to trace his roots and find his real identity in a world that’s long forgotten of what means to be human. Which leads us to the main anchor of the film: its overarching themes.

And there are many. The theme of identity in a foreign land; the theme of poverty and survival; and of course, my personal favourite: the theme of love. Love of parents, siblings, significant others, and everyone who lends a helping hand in dire times of need. Lion gracefully handles these themes both via young Saroo and his older version as well (played by Dev Patel), whilst also leaving some room for elaborate thought. That is to say, Lion doesn’t bash your head with pseudo-intellectual garbage, but instead it subtly shows how a simple wrong turn can make all the difference in life. And everybody can become estranged, no matter how rich or poor you are or what car you’re driving: it’s just the way of life.

The supporting cast also delivers. Nicole Kidman appears in a small role, but steals every scene she’s in, as if the actress experienced a long-needed recuperation from blockbusters or other bid-budgeted messes period. In fact, the cinematography perfectly captures her emotions, which felt as real as humanly possible (and even eerie at times). David Wenham as Saroo’s father also does a solid job and knocks this one right out of the streets of India.

Finally, Lion is a slow-burning drama that will hit you as hard as an amateur boxer’s punch: meaning it’ll hurt, but it’ll also pass with you coming out the wiser full stop. If you haven’t already, go ahead and see Lion, and I’m not going to repeat this twice.

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