Rent Nobody Knows (2004)

4.0 of 5 from 180 ratings
2h 20min
Rent Nobody Knows (aka Dare mo shiranai) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
Inspired by an infamous true story that made headlines in Japan in 1988, this tough yet tender film from writer-director, Hirokazu Koreeda, follows the lives of four children left to fend for themselves by their wayward mother. Having smuggled her family into a new apartment under the landlord's nose, Keiko (You) puts her 12 year old son Akira (Yûya Yagira) in charge of the youngsters and after a brief period of relative family harmony, disappears. Akira manages as best he can, but limited means and the cramped confines of the apartment force this unorthodox family unit to re-shape their narrow existence to suit their physical and emotional needs.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , Takako Tate, , , , Shinichi Hashizawa, Asato Hayashida, Suguru Horimizu, Tairiku Horita, Haruna Imai, Michi'e Kakimaru
Directors:
Producers:
Hirokazu Koreeda
Writers:
Hirokazu Koreeda
Others:
Yagira Yuuya
Aka:
Dare mo shiranai
Studio:
Icon
Genres:
Drama
Countries:
Japan, Drama
Awards:

2004 Cannes Best Actor

BBFC:
Release Date:
16/05/2005
Run Time:
140 minutes
Languages:
Japanese
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
12/08/2019
Run Time:
141 minutes
Languages:
Japanese
Subtitles:
English
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.66:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B

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Reviews (3) of Nobody Knows

Both heartwarming and disturbing - Nobody Knows review by CP Customer

Spoiler Alert
15/02/2006

The story of 'Nobody Knows' revolves around four Tokyo siblings who are suddenly abandoned by their mother. Left to fend for themselves with only a little money and a vague hope that their mother may return, the film follows the children's struggle to survive on their own under the leadership of their 12 year old brother Akira. When the food and water run out, Akira pumps water from the local playground and shamelessly scrounges leftover sushi from a restaurant to feed him and his siblings, all the while daydreaming of baseball and school. As unbelievable as the plot sounds, the film succeeds because it is told in an incredibly believable way, and is shot in an almost 'fly on the wall' documentary style with a simple piano score. It also cleverly balances good and bad events which make the experience all the more real, and really highlights the children's spirit of survival. My only criticism is that there's no real ending to the story and although the lack of closure is mildly frustrating, it also leaves you with the impression that these four children are still out there, still doing whatever it takes to survive and stay together. If you like foreign film and don't mind slow paced stories then 'Nobody Knows' is well worth a look.

2 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

A true, all-time cimematic classic - Nobody Knows review by TE

Spoiler Alert
27/11/2019

Stunningly brilliant film. Koreeda here documents the true story of four siblings abandoned in a flat in a Tokyo suburb.

In fact, Koreeda chose to smooth over some of the harshest aspects of the story, though his film still delivers a powerful and tragic punch.

Koreeda's films all seem to focus on the nuances of family connection and the bonds of blood. In this case the bonds are exclusively felt by the children and not by the feckless adults.

The performances by the children are uniformly excellent, especially Yuya Yagira as Akira.

The disintegration of young, hopeful lives is set against the vast indifference of the city.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Please, don't do what I did. Don't waste more than two hours of your life watching this boring film! - Nobody Knows review by DW

Spoiler Alert
10/08/2020

The opening credits promised a fictionalised dramatisation loosely based on a true story: ok so far, I thought.

Too much was expected of the four children in the central roles: not surprisingly, they struggled to deliver but failed.

Those behind the camera elected to shoot in a pseudo-documentary format, intending perhaps to authenticate the fact that four siblings had indeed been abandoned in Tokyo by their mother. Watching overly long repeats of the same daily scenes from exactly the same camera position soon gets extremely tiresome. I like slow but if the "action" was any slower it would go into reverse.

Why did I hang on to the end? Because I hoped the closing credits would tell me what actually happened to these four children & their mother. Fat chance of that, not a word of explanation.

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

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