Rent Ad Astra (2019)

2.9 of 5 from 1317 ratings
1h 57min
Rent Ad Astra Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
When a mysterious life-threatening event strikes Earth, astronaut Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) goes on a dangerous mission across an unforgiving solar system to uncover the truth about his missing father (Tommy Lee Jones) and his doomed expedition that now, 30 years later, threatens the universe.
Actors:
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Directors:
Writers:
James Gray, Ethan Gross
Others:
Gary Rydstrom, Mark Ulano, Tom Johnson
Studio:
20th Century Fox
Genres:
Top 100 Films, Sci-Fi & Fantasy, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/01/2020
Run Time:
117 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/01/2020
Run Time:
117 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English DTS-HD Master Audio 7.1
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Deleted Scenes with Optional Commentary by James Gray
  • To the Stars
  • A Man Named Roy
  • The Crew of the Cepheus
  • The Art of 'Ad Astra'
  • Reach for the Stars
  • Audio Commentary by James Gray
BBFC:
Release Date:
27/01/2020
Run Time:
117 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Audio Commentary by James Gray

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Reviews (34) of Ad Astra

Minus 2 - Ad Astra review by MJ

Spoiler Alert
06/02/2020

I want to score this minus 2 simply for wasting 2 hours of my life that I will never get back. It's very slow going, very boring and has virtually no story to speak of.

There is almost no action so if you're an action fan there is nothing here for you. If you like a great story there is nothing for you either. If you like a psychological drama about characters there is nothing here for you because Brad Pitt's character is basically an unfeeling robotic moron and his father, played by Tommy Lee Jones, is just a lunatic and not worth searching for.

The ending is useless too but don't worry about that because you don't want to be watching this pile of crap anyway so the ending is the least of your worries.

In summary, don't bother because it's one of the worst films ever made.

13 out of 15 members found this review helpful.

Doesn't go quite as far as the stars - Ad Astra review by CS

Spoiler Alert
10/02/2020

If you're expecting Aliens, Star ship Troopers or even the tripped out grandeur of 2001 A Space Odessey, this film isn't for you. Admittedly, it is slow, but not without merit. The story is an interesting one and although ultimately unsatisfactory, its still worth the price of admission. Pitt is quality here, to say that he is unemotional is a misunderstanding of the character he plays. His calm demeanour and level headedness under conditions of extreme danger are what gets him chosen for his mission. His one Achilles heel is the very object of his search, one which has cost him his relationship with his wife, played by the very easy on the eye Liv Tyler, who makes a brief cameo here. Much of the film is metaphor, which I fear, is the reason that some people just won't get it, but it does go to some lengths to show The Hero's Journey and the difficult and often dark choices which must be made along the way. The film looks very good and has a strange , almost 1970's feel. It is visually beautiful in many scenes but let down by a drab performance from Tommy Lee Jones and underwhelming dialogue in the end confrontation, which certainly could've been a lot better. Not brilliant, but definitely not the Pitts either.

6 out of 6 members found this review helpful.

Poor story, good acting, laws of physics? Ignored. - Ad Astra review by MD

Spoiler Alert
01/06/2020

It's been a long time since I saw a film that was as big a waste of time, and as big a disappointment, especially after reading a number of glowing reviews, as this one. Even the film title doesn't work as none of the protagonists make it out of the solar system.

Set in the near future, the motivation of the main character, Major Roy MacBride played by Brad Pitt, whose performance was the film's saving grace, was that he wanted to find his father – a hero to the rest of the world – but whom he hardly knew, and who had effectively left him emotionally disabled.

It's a story arc we've seen many times, and its predictability lost my interest pretty early on. His father has gone rogue somewhere off Neptune and is sending deadly electrical surges sunwards into the rest of the solar system using anti-matter.

One of the main problems concerned the setting of this humdrum story in space. I've become accustomed to Hollywood's playing fast and loose with the laws of physics but Ad Astra takes top spot by a country mile. People jump on and off spacecraft without a thought for the need for fuel or trajectory adjustments. Using a box of anti-matter, they send surges across billions of kilometres that result in things blowing up on Earth and Mars.

Pitt's character needs to go to Mars to deliver a message to his dad – although he could have just recorded it and sent it to Mars, if that were truly necessary, using a radio upload. We can do that now.

Laughably, they stop dead, mid-way to Mars to mount a rescue mission, find killer apes in a spaceship, and then proceed on to Mars. What happened before they got there and why the apes escaped are questions never answered – nor are we asked to care. In fact this whole episode could have been excised without altering the story arc one bit.

A few days later they get there and MacBride has to take control of the ship to stop it crashing onto the surface of the planet. His aim is to stop the electrical surges so he then jumps aboard a spaceship that's on its way to Neptune – while it's in the process of taking off – and within minutes, the rest of the crew are dead, mashed by gravity or hit by a bullet fired from a gun. Not a likely object to find on board a pressurised vehicle.

MacBride gets to Neptune after just 79 days (the New Horizons mission, which got to Pluto in 2015 took almost 10 years), and quickly finds his father's space station in orbit. After surviving multiple collisions with Neptune's ring particles, he sets up a nuclear explosive device to stop the surges but his dad doesn't want to leave and zooms off into space. Pitt's MacBride pulls off a piece of aluminium from the mission space station and surfs it back to his own spaceship – there are no problems with orbital mechanics nor any limit to the number of ring particle collisions a thin piece of aluminium can withstand. His ship is where he left it and the nuclear explosion propels him home, unharmed.

When he gets back, his girlfriend, played by a grotesquely underused Liv Tyler, walks in the door just as he's rediscovering his emotions.

The only thing that really worked in the film was Pitt's superb acting. While the film was well-produced, the complete lack of regard for even the basics of how the laws of physics work negated any joy that might have been taken from the visuals. The storyline was cliched and predictable, and would have been much better set here on Earth. His father could have been lost in the wilderness somewhere, for example, without the need for hokum such as electrical surges from Neptune.

Don't bother seeing this film, you'll only be disappointed. Unless you are a huge fan of Brad pitt – there are lots of close-ups...

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Space Movie lacking Sufficient Action - Ad Astra review by CD

Spoiler Alert
01/01/2021

I am big fan of Brad Pitt and Tommy Lee Jones, but this film gives them little scope to shine. It really falls between being a space movie with limited special effects and one that tries to analyse a father-son relationship, when the characters are not really developed enough to give it credibility. There are some clever and shocking moments, but the action sags badly at times in spite of bringing in quality actors such as Donald Sutherland in a brief but welcome cameo role.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Ad Astra review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

For a space epic with lots of special effects, explosions and, yes, even pirates on the moon, James Gray’s Ad Astra is a somber surprise of science fiction. It’d be easy for a film as large as this, boasting a blockbuster scenario and a towering lead actor, to become lost in the muck of its own action and theatrics. To my delight, however, this is a deeply cerebral and introspective film that delves deeper into the psyche of a man trying to escape from himself and out towards the stars.

Major Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) serves as an astronaut in a future where mankind has expanded to the stars. Mars now has a military base, the moon is a tourist attraction and Earth now has gigantic structures that poke the atmosphere. Roy is considered an important asset to his government because of his lack of emotion. In the opening scene, we see how he handles a very frightening power surge and explosion on a tower hundreds of miles above Earth without raising his heart rate. Even with fires and falling people surrounding him, he keeps his cool and handles the situation as best as he can before dropping towards Earth in his parachute.

He serves another purpose as well. His father (Tommy Lee Jones) recently went missing on a space station around Neptune but the government believes he may be alive and causing shockwaves that is damaging other planets and space stations. With his family connections, the military believes Roy can talk some sense into his dad and not become emotionally vulnerable given his unemotional state. This is made clear from Roy’s many psychological evaluations and his distant nature from his wife Eve (Liv Tyler). He’s so distant he doesn’t even want her to touch him. There’s also a bitter past that Roy is shutting out as hard as he can.

Roy’s unemotional state may also make him the best candidate for a simplistic sci-fi action picture as well. Indeed, the first act of the film seems to set this all up. There’s a very matter-of-fact manner of dialogue on informing Roy of his mission and Roy’s voice-over explaining his world. There’s also plenty of action with Roy making a stop at the moon where pirates attack their rover in a chase where astronauts shoot at one another. But then, once the story shifts to Mars, the film becomes more than just theatrics. Roy comes to terms with himself and his father. Thanks to his dad’s best friend (Donald Sutherland), Roy soon learns that he’s not only being lied to by the government but that he’s also lying to himself.

What’s most wondrous about a film such as this is that it boasts fantastic special effects and a fully-realized future with its own technological advancements and conflicts of resources, all of it used to tell a personal story of man’s desire to escape. Curiously, I found the film does an astounding job showcasing traits of autism. The film never outright states that Roy has this condition but he has a lot of familiar traits and his internal thoughts are very reflective.

Ad Astra has all the brilliance of the engrossing somber sci-fi I love to discover. Brad Pitt is in top form by delivering a nuanced performance of a conflicted astronaut who learns forgiveness and sadness on a journey of self-discovery. The special effects are brilliant, featuring lots of zero-g segments and many of them action-oriented with amazing tension. The atmosphere feels rustic and believable, never once looking too futuristic. There’s such a grand sense of majesty to such a film that I just can’t get it out of my mind and loved every minute of it in the theater. This is undoubtedly one of the best films of 2019.

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