Rent Coco (2017)

4.0 of 5 from 768 ratings
1h 41min
Rent Coco Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
In a vibrant story of family, fun and adventure, Miguel (Anthony Gonzalez) dreams of becoming a great musician and embarks on an extraordinary journey to the magical land of his ancestors, where the charming trickster Héctor (Gael García Bernal) becomes an unexpected friend and helps Miguel uncover the mysteries of his family's stories and traditions.
Directors:
, Adrian Molina
Voiced By:
Anthony Gonzalez, Gael García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, Alanna Ubach, Renee Victor, Jaime Camil, Alfonso Arau, Herbert Siguenza, Gabriel Iglesias, Lombardo Boyar, Ana Ofelia Murguía, Natalia Cordova-Buckley, Selene Luna, Edward James Olmos, Sofía Espinosa, Carla Medina, Dyana Ortelli, Luis Valdez, Blanca Araceli, Salvador Reyes
Writers:
Lee Unkrich, Jason Katz
Others:
Lee Unkrich, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Darla K. Anderson, Robert Lopez
Studio:
Walt Disney
Genres:
Children & Family, Kids’ TV
Awards:

2018 BAFTA Best Animated Film

2018 Oscar Best Animated Film

2018 Oscar Best Music Original Song

BBFC:
Release Date:
21/05/2018
Run Time:
101 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/05/2018
Run Time:
105 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description, French, Latin American Spanish
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing, French, Latin American Spanish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All
Bonus:
  • Welcome to the Fiest (optional audio commentary)
  • Mi Familia
  • Dante
  • How to Draw a Skeleton
  • Audio Commentary
BBFC:
Release Date:
21/05/2018
Run Time:
105 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
(0) All

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Reviews (8) of Coco

Magical tale about family and finding your own way - Coco review by Dee

Spoiler Alert
18/07/2018

Beautifully animated.

Masterfully written.

Perfectly paced.

Don't watch this alone as it's likely to make yo cry and need a hug (in a good way)

3 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Really enjoyable film - Coco review by KL

Spoiler Alert
02/10/2018

I really enjoyed this film and the animation was great - I watched it twice!

A really good way to talk to children about death and learn about different cultural expressions around this.

3 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Pixar Raise the Bar ( and the dead!) - Coco review by SS

Spoiler Alert
07/11/2018

This film is superb. Five Stars, though I would give Coco six stars if I could!

Every aspect of the production is brilliantly done and, this confirms how Pixar has created a new, golden age of animation in cahoots with Disney.

First and foremost, Coco has a great, dynamic story, with a fine dramatic turn of events. Equally, the characters are wonderfully realised , the animators acting their parts to their digital finest. Every nuance and expression is meaningful and this demonstrates a masterclass in contemporary character animation.

The film has a tangible emotional pull as well as the entertaining and humourous. In many respects this is not simply a kids film. It is a film with universal appeal, which patronises no-one in any age group.

It is a Pixar film, like their productions generally, which is intelligent, imaginative, poignant and boldly assured. I loved it. If Uncle Walt was to look down from the afterlife, he'd love it too. It captures the spirit and essence of Walt Disney at his peak.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Coco review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Coco has all the elements of a Pixar masterpiece. The animation is dazzling and ambitious, pushing the artists and animators to deliver on something never seen before in computer animation. The world is something else entirely, existing outside of the norm that many animated films would retreat towards. But the critical ingredient lies in crafting a compelling and mature tale that doesn’t hold back on the drama or emotion for being a family film. And when you have a movie about death, Pixar can’t afford to pull back or talk down their audience, even for a movie based on Mexican folklore.

Miguel Rivera is a boy that aspires to be a singing sensation like his idol Ernesto de la Cruz (Benjamin Bratt), a legendary musician and actor. But his family of the Riveras won’t have any talk of music in their household after Miguel’s great-great-grandfather left the family to pursue a career as a musician. The family favors the shoe business to keep them together for generations, but Miguel finds no soul in the soles. He’d much rather pick up a guitar and strum a passionate melody. Deciding to follow his dreams, Miguel runs off to the Day of the Dead talent show and swipes the guitar of de la Cruz.

Now things get a little more complicated. The stealing of a guitar from a crypt places a curse on Miguel, sending him to the Land of the Dead where all spirits congregate as skeletons. The only way to get back to the Land of the Living is to receive the blessing of his ancestors. This shouldn’t be a problem since there are plenty of dead relatives to help him back. They’ll do it, but only if he agrees to renounce his dreams for music. Disagreeing with them, Miguel decides to seek out de la Cruz, as he believes the man may be his great-great-grandfather.

That’s a lot of lineage and rules to unload within the first act, including the importance of being remembered in the Land of the Living and the harsh punishment for being forgotten in the Land of the Dead. This establishes why it’s so crucial that vagabond spirit Hector (Gael García Bernal) will help Miguel so long as the living boy will help him. It’s kinda wordy, but it is necessary for building a strong foundation for this dazzling world and entertaining adventure. Compare that to the chaos of The Book of Life, another animated film about the Land of the Dead that was far too frenetic to understand its vibrancy. Coco doesn’t need to try so hard to be entertaining. It’s a well-thought-out world to house a capable and emotional adventure of family, music, and murder.

Wait, murder!? Does that sound like a Pixar film? For a movie about death, yeah, it does. Some of Pixar’s best movies are the ones that are formed from a mature and honest aspect, as opposed to making everything cute, cuddly and PG enough for that PG rating. There’s no skating around the shocking reveal of betrayal and death, even as ridiculous as Ernesto’s death is for having been crushed to death by a giant bell. Even more hilarious for the spirits is Hector’s death, thought to be food poisoning. The real story is far darker.

And then there are the tears. Pixar has been doing a remarkable job at making parents cry from the faith in your child of Finding Nemo to the lost innocence in Inside Out. Coco may be their biggest offender in this department. Blindsided, a sweet and somber song of a father and daughter will cause a flood in the face for any parent. Fair warning for parents: keep the tissues ready somewhere around the end of the second act.

Ultimately, Coco succeeds at being a family film that’s actually about family and learning to appreciate your heritage, warts and all. The music is a treat for the ears, the decadently lit Land of the Dead is mesmerizing, and the plot has just enough twists and turns to keep any adult interested. Pixar has already shown how expertly they can assemble an animated film that touches on broader themes with Inside Out. Now they’re just showing off with how much further they can go.

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