Rent IT: Chapter Two (2019)

3.0 of 5 from 560 ratings
2h 43min
Rent IT: Chapter Two (aka IT 2) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
After 27 years, 'IT' has returned. As people begin to disappear in Derry, Mike (Isaiah Mustafa) calls the rest of the Losers' Club home so they can destroy IT once and for all. Damaged by the past, the Losers must conquer their deepest fears to take on Pennywise...who is now deadlier than ever.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Directors:
Producers:
Roy Lee, Dan Lin, Barbara Muschietti
Writers:
Stephen King, Gary Dauberman
Aka:
IT 2
Studio:
Warner
Genres:
Drama, Horror, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
13/01/2020
Run Time:
163 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish, English, English Audio Description, Hindi
Subtitles:
Castillian, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Greek, Hindi, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Behind the Scenes Featurette: Finding the Deadlights
BBFC:
Release Date:
13/01/2020
Run Time:
169 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish, English, English Audio Description, Italian, Polish, Thai
Subtitles:
Cantonese, Castillian, Chinese, Complex Mandarin, English Hard of Hearing, Greek, Italian Hard of Hearing, Korean, Polish, Thai
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Documentaries: The Summers of IT: Chapter One, You'll Floor Too and Chapter Two, IT Ends
  • Behind the Scenes Featurettes: This Meeting of the Losers' Club Has Officially Begun and Pennywise Lives Again! - Finding the Deadlights
  • Commentary by Director Andy Muschietti
BBFC:
Release Date:
13/01/2020
Run Time:
169 minutes
Languages:
Brazilian Portuguese, Castilian Spanish, English, English Audio Description, French Parisian, Hindi, Italian, Latin American Spanish, Thai
Subtitles:
Brazilian, Canadian French, Cantonese, Castillian, Chinese, Complex Mandarin, English Hard of Hearing, French Parisian, Hindi, Italian Hard of Hearing, Korean, Latin American Spanish, Simplified Mandarin, Thai
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Documentaries: The Summers of IT: Chapter One, You'll Floor Too and Chapter Two, IT Ends
  • Behind the Scenes Featurettes: This Meeting of the Losers' Club Has Officially Begun and Pennywise Lives Again! - Finding the Deadlights
  • Commentary by Director Andy Muschietti

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Reviews (9) of IT: Chapter Two

Disappointed - IT: Chapter Two review by AK

Spoiler Alert
17/01/2020

Looked forward to seeing the second chapter. Just a cheap horror movie that relies too much on CGI and not enough on plot. I loved the book but found myself fast forwarding till I finally quit. I'm surprised Stephen King endorsed such rubbish.

2 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Way too long and too many CGI effects in what is a rather boring horror movie - IT: Chapter Two review by PV

Spoiler Alert
26/07/2020

I have never been a particular fan of Stephen King (the only book by him I tried to read was as overlong and dull as this movie) so maybe I am not the target audience.

But anyway, by any standard's this movie is overlong with a daft silly drawn out plot (like the first one) and I yawned through a lot of it.

To horror audiences it is probably passable but so convoluted and non-sensical even to bore them.

2 stars - just.

1 out of 2 members found this review helpful.

Not all It....I'll get my coat. - IT: Chapter Two review by DS

Spoiler Alert
02/09/2020

Chapter Two comes in at over three hours long. For what the story brings to you, the way it is paced and presented this is way too long. There is a lot of flashback padding a device that a lot of story-tellers like to use nowadays but something I feel is quite often unnecessary. The device of collecting their individual 'items' or totems to defeat Pennywise that has to be completed on their own, seems to be lifted from a video game and makes little sense other than to create horrifying scenes to scare the audience. For a supernatural killing machine Pennywise or 'It' is singularly crap at killing these individual adults who fall for his tricks every single time despite knowing what he is all about, he has no problems with other people though.

Pennywise is in fact a big problem for me. Brought to life with an enthusiastic unpleasantness by Bill Skarsgård like many movie villains he seems particularly inept in crucial moments and then deadly and all-powerful in others. In Chapter Two he is so poor at killing the protagonists who are already terrified of him, he feeds on fear, then he helps Henry Bowers, Stephen Kings stock psycho-bully, from the first film now an adult and in......shock again...a mental hospital, to escape to murder his 'Losers' enemies. Henry turns out to be dab squib, he was in the book if I remember properly and is fairly easily disposed of, I was never sure of his purpose in the story, even more so in the film. Pennywise is so cartoonish that he becomes a slightly more deadly version of Sideshow Bob but also is at poor at getting his tormentors as Sideshow Bob is. It just is not scary.

Andy Muschietti treats us to little glimpses of the films that he has liked in the past and whilst some film-loving viewers will enjoy this I personally felt it was cack-handed. In the original book Pennywise takes the form of films or popular culture figures that the kids would be terrified of, so Michael Landon's 'Teenage Werewolf' and so forth, the film-makers removed this aspect as they felt modern audiences would not get the references. Instead we get other references, not to do with the modus operandi of It that some modern viewers 'won't get'. Odd choice I think.

A running joke throughout the film is James McAvoy's Stephen King avatar, is constantly being told his stories have bad endings and he cannot write them. He's even told by Stephen King himself in another cameo yuk, yuk. The funny thing is It both in book and film form and in this incarnation rather prove the point. The ending, and in particular Pennywise's demise is poor and a letdown. From that point on the reconciliation of the 'Losers' is handled better but so many questions are swept under the carpet. People could not have forgotten which is hinted at is the power of It because It was dead. So there is a lot of destruction, death and mayhem that appears to have never really been explained.

It: Chapter Two is longer and weaker than Chapter One but is entertaining enough to watch but the real problem is the length, scope and themes of the story. This large Stephen King novel with multiple storylines, characters and time periods is really best suited for a multi-part TV series, which of course was created to reasonable effect back in 1990.

The film is okay but it's not all it.

Clever ain't I?

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

IT: Chapter Two (aka IT 2) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

I’m not one to bash a picture for being too long; no good film is too long, no terrible film short enough. But at nearly three hours, I feel like that time should be used wisely, even if it’s based on a supremely thick novel by Stephen King. IT Chapter 2, unfortunately, spends most of that running time basking in its surreal scares than getting to know its now grown-up characters. If only it had enough faith in its strong cast to flourish instead of being overpowered by a nonstop cavalcade of nightmare tedium.

27 years have passed and its once more time for the tradition if the supernatural clown Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård) to rise from his sewer sanctum to munch on victims once more. He still goes after kids but now feasts on targets of fearful homosexuals. Such an opening appears as though it may be opening the flood gates for a new kind of story. Those hopes are dashed quickly when realizing this is mere fodder for Pennywise's rampage.

Realizing they can't run away from this ordeal, the Losers Club reassembles in Derry for one more bout of clown killing, this time do I'll ng enough homework to finish the job. The most notable of the cast is James McAvoy playing a grownup Bill who still struggles with his speech impediment and now a writers' block for ending his screenplays. He still hasn't gotten over the loss of his childhood brother Georgie from the first movie and needs some closure.

The only problem is that everyone else is in the same spot and crowd each other as they divide up individual screen time. Jessica Chastain plays a grownup Beverly who still hasn't gotten over her abusive father and finds herself in an abusive relationship. Bill Hader plays a grownup Richie who is still funny but hasn't fully come out of the closet and kinda doesn't for this film. There's just so much to do that the second becomes a monotonous string of nostalgia and scares to the point where all surprises have faded, where even a giant naked woman with nasty teeth and vomiting zombie seems mundane by the film's own standards.

It’s not that the scary scenes are poorly assembled but they lack a certain sensation of fear. This seems especially clear from the odd edits to the film that seems to have been made in post-production. After Eddie is scarred in an attack by a knife-wielding maniac, he exits the room and mutters as he gets to the door how the killer should get rid of the mullet in the modern era. Another scene with Eddie features a leper puking black goo all over him and a classic rock song has been placed over it because, I dunno, I guess it’s funnier. But even the many aspects that don’t seem like post-production comedy calls have such a reach for laughs they transform this tale into a much different film. Why does Bill try to keep kids away from streetside sewer drains when he knows full well Pennywise can strike anywhere he wants? Why do Eddie and Richie have a scary door bit during the climax that feels like its from a Laurel and Hardy movie? Why does the gang do a “check, please” joke after destroying a dining room where Pennywise’s terror strikes them all?

IT Chapter 2 comes to a clunky end by slamming in so many scenes from the novel without much genuine flow or frights. Despite the central message seeming a little more clear and a cute cameo by Stephen King, the film is ultimately an exhausting experience that never fully engages over the course of its three hours.

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