Rent 3 Faces (2018)

3.5 of 5 from 90 ratings
1h 40min
Rent 3 Faces (aka Three Faces / Se rokh) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
In Jafar Panahi's latest film, which won the Best Screenplay Award in Cannes, actress Behnaz Jafari is distraught when she comes across a young girl's video plea for help after her family prevents her from taking up her studies at the Tehran drama conservatory. Behnaz abandons her shoot and turns to the filmmaker Jafar Panahi to help her with the young girl's troubles. They travel by car to the rural, Azeri-speaking Northwest of Iran, where they encounter the charming and generous folk of the girl's mountain village. But Behnaz and Jafar also discover that old traditions die hard.
Actors:
, , Marziyeh Rezaei, Maedeh Erteghaei, Narges Delaram
Directors:
Producers:
Jafar Panahi
Writers:
Jafar Panahi, Nader Saeivar
Others:
Nader Saeivar
Aka:
Three Faces / Se rokh
Studio:
New Wave Films
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Drama
Countries:
Iran, Action & Adventure, Drama
Awards:

2018 Cannes Best Screen Play Ex-aequo

BBFC:
Release Date:
22/07/2019
Run Time:
100 minutes
Languages:
Farsi
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.85:1
Colour:
Colour

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Reviews (1) of 3 Faces

Impressive and brave - 3 Faces review by PD

Spoiler Alert
17/01/2020

This latest offering from Iranian director Jafar Panahi is another not-so subtle political allegory, with the director taking twinned roles of director and driver, as in 'Taxi Tehran'. He again plays himself (or at least a version of himself) and spends a large part of the film behind the wheel motoring through the Iranian countryside to help an actress (Behnaz Jafari, also playing herself) find a missing woman. In so doing they also find other women, including one who remains invisible to the camera, and thus is raised the theme of gender division that runs through the film. The division between fiction and documentary, performance and 'real life', and the intimate claustrophobia of the car, becomes an emblem of the larger interior-exterior divide faced by all the characters, particularly the women; the question of a woman’s proper role — onscreen and off — is raised time and time again. There's also some quirky touches and gentle humour, particularly in scenes involving the villagers, although perhaps the humour isn't quite as cutting as it was in 'Taxi Tehran'.

Quite a few of the plot twists are perhaps a tad contrived, and the defiant ending seems rather implausible to me, but this is still an impressive and brave piece of work.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

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