Rent Black Adam (2022)

2.8 of 5 from 363 ratings
2h 0min
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  • General info
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Synopsis:
Nearly 5,000 years after he was bestowed with the almighty powers of the Egyptian gods - and imprisoned just as quickly - Black Adam (Dwayne Johnson) is freed from his earthly tomb, ready to unleash his unique form of justice on the modern world.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , Mohammed Amer, , , , , , , , , , , A. Manuel 'Manny' Miranda
Directors:
Producers:
Beau Flynn, Dany Garcia, Hiram Garcia, Dwayne Johnson
Writers:
Adam Sztykiel, Rory Haines, Sohrab Noshirvani, Bill Parker, C.C. Beck, Jack Kirby, Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster
Studio:
Warner
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
16/01/2023
Run Time:
120 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Castillian, Danish, English, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
16/01/2023
Run Time:
125 minutes
Languages:
English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, Italian DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1
Subtitles:
Danish, English Hard of Hearing, Finnish, Italian Hard of Hearing, Norwegian, Swedish
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • The History of 'Black Adam'
  • Who Is the Justice Society?
  • From Soul to Screen
  • Black Adam: A New Type of Action
  • Costumes Make the Hero
  • And More
BBFC:
Release Date:
16/01/2023
Run Time:
125 minutes
Languages:
Castilian Spanish Dolby Atmos, Castilian Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1, English Audio Description Dolby Digital 5.1, English Dolby Atmos, French Parisian Dolby Atmos, French Parisian Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:
Castillian, Dutch, English Hard of Hearing, French Parisian
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B

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Reviews (8) of Black Adam

Oh dear ! - Black Adam review by si

Spoiler Alert
26/01/2023

Utter garbage..had to turn off the dvd player after 15 minutes of this cringeworthy tripe..utter garbage, had to press the stop button on the dvd remote after 15 cringeworthy minutes of this cringe fest

0 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Unadulterated rubbish - Black Adam review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
28/03/2023

Nothing to see here unless you’re a Marvel/DC fanboy devoid of any critical faculties. Dwayne plays a one-expression ‘flying magic man’ as one character calls him, but most of the time he’s replaced by a cgi avatar to deal with the usual cgi flash-bangs. Neither Dwayne nor even normally reliable director Jaume Coillet-Serra can do anything with this tripe.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

An Indulgent Assault on the Senses - Black Adam review by Pork Chop Express

Spoiler Alert
05/04/2023

I was kind of hoping for better from DC. But this is yet another dud.

With such great characters they just don't seem to be able to make something entertaining any more.

This is a 2 hour over saturated CGI assault on the senses which become numbed and indifferent to all the goings on about 45mins in. Its just TOO much. I found myself just longing to see a few mins where I wasn't looking at an obvious CG character or effect or a backdrop that was CG either.

It felt like half the film was about hits: punches, explosions, objections crashing into each other and things zipping around the screen like the CGI Black Adam.

A parallel universe (I think) which for some reason has the same vans, music, guns and language as us is inexplicably introduced along with a group of improperly introduced superheros with no backstory.

I couldn't care less about the Shazam blarney either. What a load of cobblers. Who wrote that in DC?! Give me Batman - Bale, Keaton or Affleck or Superman - Reeve or Cavill any day of the week..

What it felt to me was a self indulgent product from Dwayne Johnson who acting as producer has tried to make himself look amazing and get all the great lines.

Unfortunately it backfires and you end up enjoying the unknown human supporting cast and a bit of Pierce Brosnan acting much more.

I am so glad I didn't waste my time or money watching this at the pictures.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Black Adam review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Here comes another anti-hero to the DCEU. The good news is that Black Adam represents a different dynamic than previous superheroes by being entirely driven by revenge and a desire to squash imperialism. The bad news is that he’s trapped inside a PG-13 movie that feels obliged to stick strictly with the superhero formula. The result is one of the DCEU’s passable entries but also is most frustrating for ALMOST being good.

Dwayne Johnson takes on the role of Black Adam which DC Comics fans have been pushing for many years. Well, the wish is granted and Johnson’s acting style fits about as neatly as you’d expect. Playing a fish-out-of-water wizard overlord, he’s an intimidating presence the way he first shows up and lays waste Intergang. After an exciting sequence of punching people at super speeds and zapping people with super electricity, he shows interest in his home of Kahndaq. Now under the control of the high-tech Intergang crime syndicate, Black Adam fights back violently and the occupied populace applauds his rebellion.

Challenging this violence is the Justice Society, an already assembled ensemble that has apparently been around in the DCEU for decades but was never worth bringing up until this point. This is a rocky introduction to how the film introduces the four members of Doctor Fate, Hawkman, Atom Smasher, and Cyclone. The film does little to explain Fate’s possession and manipulation powers, Hawkman’s origins of Egyptian and alien tech, Atom Smasher’s legacy of living up to his family line, or Cyclone’s pathos. More importantly, though, we don’t know how the Justice Society fully operates. This is particularly concerning when it appears that Amanda Waller (Viola Davis) recruits them in addition to her work with Task Force X. How deep does Waller’s Rolodex of heroes and villains go?

After some genuinely thrilling fight scenes and strong special effects, the topic of Black Adam’s violence and his perceptions of colonization leads to a debate with the Justice Society. This could be a great development if the rest of the film concerned Black Adam trying to remove intergang and subvert Waller’s rule, similar to what happened in The Suicide Squad. Sadly, these topics are mostly chucked aside when the third act focuses entirely on the demonic villain Sabbac. He’s a generic bad guy who wants to take over the world and the only way to beat him is to kill him by ripping the crown off his head and tearing him apart.

Some will note that this film feels like the DCEU getting back to reforming its ways by the inclusion of a certain superhero in the post-credit scene. This inclusion, however, is more baffling than exciting. It raises more questions about where the politics of these characters lie and seems more interested in whether or not this character could beat Black Adam. I don’t really care who could defeat him. I’m more interested in how Black Adam would handle Kahndaq in the modern age where American exceptionalism seems to be an increasing issue in the battle of heroes and villains. That might seem like a tall order but it’s something that Black Adam brings up, talks about, and then just kinda leaves that thread hanging.

Black Adam is an ALMOST-good DCEU entry. There are great ideas present and some great thrills thanks to the well-staged fights and the dry wit of Dwayne Johnson dominating this movie. So much of that potential is squandered by this film keeping things too simple and diverting what could’ve been an intriguing development in DC Comics movies to a bog-standard script of compelling action and lacking commentary.

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