Rent Blue Is the Warmest Colour (2013)

3.7 of 5 from 442 ratings
2h 53min
Rent Blue Is the Warmest Colour (aka La vie d'Adèle - Chapitres 1 et 2) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
15-year-old Adele (Adele Exarchopoulos) feels like an average teenager, with school, friends, parents and boys taking up most of her time and thoughts. That is until a chance encounter with a beguiling blue-haired girl (Lea Seydoux) turns her world upside down, forcing her to question her desires and assert herself as a woman and as an adult.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , Fanny Maurin, Maelys Cabezon, Samir Bella, Tom Hurier, Manon Piette, Quentin Médrinal, Peter Assogbavi, Wisdom Ayanou
Directors:
Producers:
Brahim Chioua, Abdel Kechiche, Vincent Maraval
Writers:
Abdellatif Kechiche, Ghalia Lacroix
Aka:
La vie d'Adèle - Chapitres 1 et 2
Studio:
Artificial Eye Film Company Ltd.
Genres:
Drama, Lesbian & Gay, Romance
Countries:
France, Top 100 Films, Drama, Lesbian & Gay, Romance
Awards:

2013 Cannes Palme d'Or

2013 Cannes Palme d'Or Honorary

BBFC:
Release Date:
17/03/2014
Run Time:
173 minutes
Languages:
French
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Trailer
  • Interviews with Director Abdellatif Kechiche and Actress Adele Exarchopoulos
  • Deleted Scenes
BBFC:
Release Date:
17/03/2014
Run Time:
177 minutes
Languages:
French
Subtitles:
English
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Trailer
  • Interviews with Director Abdellatif Kechiche and Actress Adele Exarchopoulos
  • Deleted Scenes

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Reviews (1) of Blue Is the Warmest Colour

France does it again - Blue Is the Warmest Colour review by GG

Spoiler Alert
13/04/2014

The French film industry produces some very good films and this one I found superb. The tale of a young girl maturing and having had a relationship with an older boy at school, she realizes something is missing, and is drawn into a beautiful relationship with a girl she meets. There are a lot of sex scenes without emotion as the critic review says, but the point is this is a young girl finding herself aroused in an unexpected way, and enjoying it. The emotional builds slowly.

I loved this film.

4 out of 4 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Blue Is the Warmest Colour (aka La vie d'Adèle - Chapitres 1 et 2) review by George Hooper - Cinema Paradiso

Having won the Palme D’Or at Cannes this year I had to see Blue is the Warmest Colour, even considering the controversy it had caused over its explicit sex scenes. Although it wasn’t at all what I was expecting, I’m pleased to say that Abdellatif Kechiche’s film is terrific as it gets to the core of a doomed relationship in a real and different way.

The film follows the life of Adele, a schoolgirl who finds herself attracted to a mysterious blue haired student named Emma. As Adele pursuits Emma she must also contend with her closeted nature as well as the prejudices that she can expect from people. However the two’s relationship proves just like any other and it may be a more ordinary problem that sees to their inevitable end.

Although a unique picture the film has trouble connecting on an emotional level, it lacks the kind of character moments that are expected of a relationship drama. Where a conventional film would build Adele and Emma’s relationship to a peak before watching it crumble, Kechiche chooses to mix the good with the bad. The films many explicit sex scenes also remove you from the experience as regular emotional beats are replaced with overly indulgent intercourse that lingers too long and never really feels necessary. In fact the film has almost 30 minutes of sex scenes, most of which prove emotionally stunted.

The film finds its footing on the back of lead actress Adèle Exarchopoulos who makes Adele an endlessly watchable person, both good and bad, vapid and intelligent. She gives a powerhouse performance that meshes brilliantly with Lea Seydoux’s Emma.

Ultimately a film about the way relationships share the same characteristics, even with different types of partners. The film gets great joy out of building this relationship in an honest and real way. Filled with clever dialogue, relatable characters and some gut wrenching final scenes, Blue is the Warmest Colour is a breath of fresh air.

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