Rent Spectre (2015)

3.3 of 5 from 616 ratings
2h 22min
Rent Spectre (aka Bond 24) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
A cryptic message from the past sends James Bond (Daniel Craig) on a rogue mission to Mexico City and eventually Rome, where he meets Lucia Sciarra (Monica Bellucci), the beautiful and forbidden widow of an infamous criminal. Bond infiltrates a secret meeting and uncovers the existence of the sinister organisation known as Spectre. Meanwhile back in London, Max Denbigh (Andrew Scott), the new head of the Centre for National Security, questions Bond's actions and challenges the relevance of MI6, led by M (Ralph Fiennes). Bond covertly enlists Moneypenny (Naomie Harris) and Q (Ben Whishaw) to help him seek out Madeleine Swann (Lea Seydoux), the daughter of his old nemesis Mr.
White (Jesper Christensen), who may hold the clue to untangling the web of Spectre. As the daughter of an assassin, she understands Bond in a way most others cannot. As Bond ventures towards the heart of Spectre, he learns of a chilling connection between himself and the enemy he seeks, played by Christoph Waltz.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Domenico Fortunato, , Stefano Elfi DiClaudia, ,
Directors:
Producers:
Barbara Broccoli, Michael G. Wilson
Writers:
John Logan, Neal Purvis
Others:
Sam Smith, Jimmy Napes
Aka:
Bond 24
Studio:
20th Century Fox
Genres:
British Films, Action & Adventure, New Releases, Thrillers
Countries:
UK
Awards:

2016 Oscar Best Music Original Song

BBFC:
Release Date:
22/04/2016
Run Time:
142 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Video Blogs: 'Director Sam Mendes'; 'Supercars'; 'Introducing Lea Seydoux and Monica Bellucci'; 'Action'; 'Music'; 'Guinness World Record'; 'Day of the Dead Festival'
BBFC:
Release Date:
22/04/2016
Run Time:
142 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Spectre: Bond's Biggest Opening Sequence
  • Video Blogs: Director Sam Mendes; Supercars; Introducing Lea Seydoux and Monica Bellucci; Action; Music and Guinness World Record
  • Stills Gallery
BBFC:
Release Date:
11/11/2019
Run Time:
142 minutes
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B

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Reviews (5) of Spectre

Goodbye, Mister Bond - Spectre review by Count Otto Black

Spoiler Alert
28/04/2016

There have been a lot of Bond films over the years. Hardly surprising, given that it's the longest-running franchise in movie history. And I think we can all agree that some have been better than others. But this? What can I say? Well, let's start with an opening that fails to be even remotely exciting, during which Bond's extremely dull prolonged fistfight aboard a helicopter endangers a huge crowd of innocent people so blatantly that his superiors feebly complain later in the film, before forgetting all about it. This seems to be a rehash of the scene at the beginning of "Skyfall" where Bond is given a direct order to walk away from one person who needs his help right now because a lot more people might die later if he doesn't, written by people who aren't intelligent enough to understand what worked about it the first time round. Naturally, it's immediately followed by a forgettably formulaic Bond theme song performed by a whiny-voiced nonentity who was famous at the exact moment this film needed to be made.

James Bond is not a superhero, and even before CGI made superhero movies an affordable major movie genre, we all knew that Bond was at his weakest when he tried to be Superman. The previous entry in the series seemed to indicate that Hollywood knew this, and I think we were all looking forward to seeing a more human Bond coping with global problems in the manner of a normal person who is very good at his job, but is still capable of doubt, regret, and bleeding when he's shot. Instead, we get a more human Bond who triumphs because his foes are cardboard cutouts who lazily conform to the stereotypes laid down by every previous Bond movie. Which is just as well, because Bond himself is at times so inept that towards the end there are moments when he appears to win simply because the good guy always does.

This film has no interesting characters whatsoever. In the closing minutes, Bond drops so many hints that he's through with it, including literally throwing away his gun, that it's clear they don't expect Daniel Craig to do another one, and the franchise can go in any direction at all because nobody cares any more. Meanwhile, we're thrown endless meaningless nods to older, better Bond films, while the plot lumbers along in the most predictable direction imaginable. It looks very much as though they're deliberately dismantling the franchise to the point where they can introduce a Bond so different from all the previous ones that he's clearly a completely different person, and use that as an excuse to change everything except that lucrative trademarked name. Well, good luck with that. But this really is a desperately tired film, and they don't even have the excuse of a screenwriters' strike. By normal standards it would only be a little below average, but as an A-list mega-blockbuster continuing a franchise older than I am, this is a dismal effort, and unless the next one is a truly heroic return to form, I think this is the beginning of the end. Goodbye, mister Bond...

1 out of 3 members found this review helpful.

Probably the most boring thriller/action movie ever - Spectre review by William London

Spoiler Alert
08/05/2016

I had to fight hard to resist the urge to fall asleep. A theatre play can have more action than this terrible movie.

I feel cheated for paying to watch it !

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Relentlessly Dour - Spectre review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
14/05/2016

After a brilliantly-sustained gravity-defying opening shot we’re into by-the-numbers fisticuffs in a helicopter and Sam Smith’s nails-on-chalkboard falsetto credits song (even worse than Adele’s in Skyfall). Then it gets worse. Didn’t Bond used to be fun? It plods along efficiently enough but it’s all so relentlessly dour.

Sam Mendes was apparently induced back to the director’s chair because of some backstory about Bond and Blofeld, but it’s of zero interest. Mendes comes from a theatrical background and can’t direct action, which is surely a prerequisite of a Bond helmsman. Daniel Craig is painfully po-faced throughout. Come back Roger Moore, all is forgiven.

Shorn of sexuality to assuage feminist sensitivity, Lea Seydoux’s damsel-in-distress Bond girl role seems even more sexist than Pussy Galore’s. All dialogue is instantly forgettable. Chris Walz, such a good baddie in Inglorious Basterds, is seriously underwritten as the villain. He has nothing to do but talk. In a lightbulb moment, the screenwriter even has Bond tell him to get on with it: ‘Nothing can be as painful as listening to you talk.’ Unfortunately, this is true of everyone. Never has a Bond movie had so much banal, instantly forgettable dialogue.

You’ll soon be ignoring whatever plot there is and waiting for a bit of action. The only action of any interest is a fight on train, but even this only make one pine for a rerun of From Russia With Love. If you want to know how a Bond movie should be done, watch Kingsman.

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Spectre (aka Bond 24) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

All of the momentum built up by Daniel Craig’s arc as James Bond screeches to a halt with Spectre. Moving on from the backstory and development of the character, this latest Bond feature finds itself slipping into the same old formula with none of the grit or substance. It’s not a massive misfire, but rather average for James Bond. And after the amazing redefining of the titular character from Casino Royale to Skyfall, the series now seems to be struggling to find somewhere else to go.

The setup is promising enough with Bond foiling a stadium bombing in Mexico during the Day of the Dead. After a fantastic opening featuring Daniel Craig scaling rooftops and trading fists in a moving helicopter, he notices an emblem on the ring of his target. It’s a cryptic message alluding to the secret crime organization Spectre that happens to be tied to Bond’s past. While the new M (Ralph Fiennes) is in the midst of a department merger which shuts down the ‘00’ program, James goes rogue as he tracks down clues which will bring him closer to the mastermind of Spectre. Only Q and Moneypenny can help him with information and creative gadgets.

Initially, that plot sounds engaging the way it delves more into James’ past with clues that reach into previous movies from the series. But the continuing story is mostly put on hold for another world domination plot where the fate of the secret service and free world is on the line. Most of the dialogue is the usual quipping of Bond banter or overlong exposition for what essentially amounts to just another villain for the secret agent to foil.

Bond’s nemesis for this picture is Franz Oberhauser played by Christoph Waltz who feels underused in the role. He delivers that sinister grin he does so well, but never really steals a scene with how standard a villain he portrays. There’s a bit of a twist thrown in with identity, but it appears as more of a plot padder than a real development in the story. The same goes for his muscle played Dave Bautista as a mute goon fulfilling the a-typical baddie for Bond to combat. Bautista does make for a great bad guy with his powerful stance and death grips, but he could’ve used a better hook besides digging his thumbs into eyeballs.

While Spectre is lacking in its script, it does its best to make up for that shortcoming with its set pieces. The opening is dazzling as it takes place during the festive Day of the Dead before buildings start toppling. Every car chase has plenty of collisions, gun play and even a bit of humor the way 007 fumbles with the controls of his car. There’s even a fantastic chase with the bad guys in cars and Bond in a plane, soaring around cliffside roads of a snowy Austria.

But for being such a standard Bond flick, it’s needlessly drawn out at two and a half hours. For every thrilling sequence of Bond utilizing gadgets and smarts to dispatch his enemies, there’s a longer section of exposition. For every decent joke here and there, there are five more that act as ineffective nudges and winks to the series. The manner in which Bond states his name in the typical method and orders martinis for his evening of romance make this picture feel as though it were a nostalgic reboot than a continuation of Craig’s storyline.

As a simple action picture, Spectre is serviceable for those who want average James Bond antics. He gets the girl, he gets the car, he gets to drink, he gets to shoot and he gets the bad guy in the end. But if you’ve enjoyed the series up to this point, you’ll be very disappointed in this rather mediocre James Bond movie that pales in comparison to its predecessors. If a longer running time and bigger budget can only muster such a substandard Bond picture, it may be time to let the series rest and regroup before it tragically fizzles out of ideas. Because I like my James Bond movies shaken with action and intrigue; not stirred with the same old tricks.

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