Rent Mad God (2021)

3.3 of 5 from 151 ratings
1h 24min
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Synopsis:
Follow The Assassin through a forbidding world of tortured souls, decrepit bunkers, and wretched monstrosities forged from the most primordial horrors of the subconscious mind. Every set, creature, and effigy in this macabre masterpiece is hand crafted and painstakingly animated using traditional stop-motion techniques. 'Mad God' is a labour of love, a testament to the power of creative grit, and an homage to the timeless art of stop-motion animation. Ready your eyes. Ready your spirit. Prepare to meet your maker.
Directors:
Producers:
Phil Tippett
Voiced By:
Alex Cox, Niketa Roman, Satish Ratakonda, Harper Taylor, Brynn Taylor, Hans Brekke, Brett Foxwell, Jake Freytag, Harper Gibbons, Tom Gibbons, Tucker Gibbons, Arne Hain, David Lauer, Chris Morley, Alexandre Poncet, Anthony Ruivivar, Talal Selhami
Writers:
Phil Tippett
Studio:
Acorn Media
Genres:
Anime & Animation, Horror, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
05/12/2022
Run Time:
84 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Digital Stereo
Subtitles:
English
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Commentary with Phil Tippett and Guillermo del Toro
  • Cast and Crew Commentary
  • Interview with 'Mad God' Writer/Director Phil Tippett
  • 'Mad God' Influences and Inspirations
  • Maya Tippett's "The Making of Mad God"
  • Maya Tippett's "Worse Than the Demon"
  • Academy of Art University and 'Mad God'
  • Behind-the-Scenes Montage
  • Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery
BBFC:
Release Date:
05/12/2022
Run Time:
84 minutes
Languages:
English Dolby Digital Stereo
Subtitles:
English
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 1.78:1 / 16:9
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Commentary with Phil Tippett and Guillermo del Toro
  • Cast and Crew Commentary
  • Interview with 'Mad God' Writer/Director Phil Tippett
  • 'Mad God' Influences and Inspirations
  • Maya Tippett's "The Making of Mad God"
  • Maya Tippett's "Worse Than the Demon"
  • Academy of Art University and 'Mad God'
  • Behind-the-Scenes Montage
  • Behind-the-Scenes Photo Gallery

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Reviews (4) of Mad God

I Will Not Savour Your Pleasing Odours - if I had a quid for every time this was said to me.... - Mad God review by Strovey

Spoiler Alert
02/02/2023

It is very difficult to give an opinion of Mad God. Everything about this film is imagery as would be expected from visual effects people who have worked at the top of their game. Here we go back to the Willis O’Brien King Kong days, herkie-jerky stop motion, which must have taken a decade of months just to complete one or two scenes, especially in time off and at weekends. But the effort pays off. The visuals are arresting, beguiling and horrifying. You somehow connect with the Assassin despite knowing exactly what he is and how he came to be on your screen. That just in itself is a mighty skill. I reiterate there is no dialogue, no easily followed narrative. The viewer must get everything they get from the film by watching the images placed in front of them and nothing else.

So without waffling away too long I can only give a short opinion. As I mentioned above there is no easily followed narrative or plot which is indeed the film's weakness and its strength.

The strength is a film with an indecipherable story featuring almost exclusively stop-motion models is still engaging and well worth watching.

The weakness is with an indecipherable story you are forced to focus on the images presented. Hellscapes, tortures, both real and surreal but by the hour mark it starts to get wearing. I was more intrigued when we were transported, along with Assassin to clearly recognisable areas. The level of ‘war’ was intriguing. huge monolithic tanks warring with each other for eternity, devastated cities, atomic bombs constantly going off. A level of Hell that must simply be called ‘war’. I particularly liked the early level with the let’s say ‘dust bunny men’ being crushed by the relentless machines and gods of industry, destroyed, swept up and then reconfigured to work for all time and have the same things happen over and over again. That was as great as it was depressing.

Others that watch those scenes will interpret them another way. That is the beauty of any great art, the viewer sees what they see in it, the person next to them something else. No one is right, no one is wrong. Mad God is very much this way.

I will confess, heresy to some I would imagine, my mind started to wander in the final quarter, I saw what was going to happen coming and was at least partially correct and by then the relentless weird images, rather like steak every day for dinner, were starting to lose some lustre, as it were.

This is not to say Mad God is a bad film or boring. It is not, the skill and dedication and attention to detail are up there as clear as day. The idea of a thoughtless, heartless, cruel, netherworld of pain, death, deviation and never-ending horror is all very Hieronymus Bosch but for the medium of film I felt this needed a tiny bit more narrative and perhaps a smallish break from the bleakness.

Oh and ever wondered what happened to that unique director Alex Cox? Apparently, he’s been growing his nails....

I read that Phil Tippett wanted to make this longer and not knowing what he had in mind it could have then been perfect or possibly worse. We will never know.

Mad God is indeed mad. It is a work of mad love and dedication and showcases a vivid and dark imagination produced by a person at the very top of the tree.

If you are a film buff of any type you must see Mad God. Even if it is only once.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Mad God - Mad God review by griggs

Spoiler Alert
08/07/2024

While the artistry and ambition of Mad Dog are to be heralded, the end result is a confused tapestry where the narrative gets lost in the shuffle. It is a visual feast that leaves the audience yearning for a more coherent story to anchor its stunning images.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Mostly style and not a lot of substance - Mad God review by Other Worlds

Spoiler Alert
19/01/2023

You might , like me, have fun recognising some of the references to other movies. I spotted "Jason and the Argonauts" , "Forbidden Planet", "2010", "The Invisible Man" (the Claude Rains version), "Psycho" , "King Kong", "Badlands" and possibly "The Island of Dr. Moreau" (the Richard Stanley version) and maybe even "Toy Story" but for me that was about as much fun as I had.

If I had gone into it with the understanding that this was a movie where the journey was more important than the destination I might have had a better time. As it was I ended up with only one question pre-eminent in my mind, namely, "What the heck was that all about ??"

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Mad God review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Phil Tippett is a technical genius of movies that is worth remembering. Having been involved in everything from the stop-motion effects of Star Wars to the creature effects of Starship Troopers, Tippett’s artistic expertise is so grand that he deserves to helm his own film. While Phil has been granted a heartfelt documentary to his name, his crowning achievement is undeniably Mad God, a brilliant showcase of his mastery of mediums while tapping into something far more cerebral and terrifying than simple horror.

Tippett’s film reminded me a lot of the independent animated films of Bill Plympton with how experimental, odd, and loaded with passion it appears. The film takes place in a hellish vision of the future, where a lone assassin is tasked with descending into the depths of hell to set off a bomb, presumably. We can only assume as much based on the masked assassin carrying a briefcase with a timer. We’re not told much about this character or the underground hellscape he’s descending into.

The underground world is one of the weird monsters that amble, torture, suffer, and endure several levels of pain. The assassin observes as caged creatures are chopped up by a deranged butcher of nasty tasty, and greasy skin. Masked individuals of giant-sized are electrocuted in their electric chairs. Faceless beings toil away for mindless work that only chews them up and spits them out. All of these horrors soon become too much for the assassin, who succumbs to the tortures of the grotesque doctors of this world, extracting his very being in a gory manner. What they extract is the same ingredient of life that gives birth to the cosmos, evolution, and death.

Now that’s just the bare bones of the plot, but that doesn’t even begin to describe this surreal experience. There’s this enticing nature to how the film delves deeper into the darker depths of the soul, presenting even more disgusting and terrifying sights the deeper it goes. Portrayed in stop-motion, traditional animation, clay, and even stilted live-action, the whole look and feel of the film is the perfect encapsulation of a creepy nightmare. It’s a nightmare where you never know where it’s going but want to go further, peering at what lies underneath the darker corners of this world.

A common criticism might be that the film does little to place a plot on top of Tippett’s many fearful creations and creatures. The good news is that it finds something bigger to explore in the film's final act, slathering the screen with a smear of humanity and time that centers the contemplation less on the technical and more on the supernatural. While setting sights such high for this animated horror, it mainly reaches its potential of becoming something more than dazzling animation or a mundane plot of stopping evil. Evil isn’t something to be conquered in this film but something that becomes a dark component of life itself.

Mad God will not be everybody’s cup of tea, considering its heavy notes of gore, surreality, torture, blood, despair, and great cruelty oozing out of its nightmare setting. But for those who enjoy taking a trip to the darker side of life and are curious about what lies beyond within both our flesh and subconscious, this is an astounding film that Tippett has assembled. This is an unforgettable film that is sure to be a highlight of the medium for being so daring.

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