Rent The House with a Clock in Its Walls (2018)

3.0 of 5 from 366 ratings
1h 40min
Rent The House with a Clock in Its Walls Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
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Synopsis:
This magical adventure tells the story of 10-year-old Lewis (Owen Vaccaro), who goes to live with his uncle in a creepy old house. When Lewis discovers that the house has a mysterious tick-tocking sound coming from its walls, the local town's sleepy facade jolts to life. Determined to find the ticking, Lewis uncovers a secret world of warlocks and witches and accidentally awakens the dead - forcing Lewis, his Uncle Jonathan (Jack Black) and their neighbour, Mrs Zimmerman (Cate Blanchett) into a race against time to save the world.
Actors:
, , , , , , , , , Vanessa Anne Williams, , , , , , , Caleb Lawrence, Dylan Gage, , Jackson T. Giles IV
Directors:
Producers:
Bradley J. Fischer, Eric Kripke, James Vanderbilt
Writers:
Eric Kripke, John Bellairs
Studio:
EntertainmentOne
Genres:
Action & Adventure, Children & Family, Comedy, Horror, Sci-Fi & Fantasy
BBFC:
Release Date:
28/01/2019
Run Time:
100 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Feature Commentary with Director Eli Roth and Actor Jack Black
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • Warlocks and Witches
  • Movie Magic
  • Tick Tock: Bringing the Book to Life
  • Eli Roth: Director's Journals
  • Owen Goes Behind the Scenes
  • Do You Know Jack Black?
  • Jack Black's Greatest Fear
  • The Mighty Wurlitzer
BBFC:
Release Date:
28/01/2019
Run Time:
104 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Feature Commentary with Director Eli Roth and Actor Jack Black
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • Warlocks and Witches
  • Movie Magic
  • Tick Tock: Bringing the Book to Life
  • Eli Roth: Director's Journals
  • Owen Goes Behind the Scenes
  • Do You Know Jack Black?
  • Jack Black's Greatest Fear
  • The Mighty Wurlitzer
BBFC:
Release Date:
28/01/2019
Run Time:
104 minutes
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
Languages:
English, English Audio Description
Subtitles:
Dutch Hard of Hearing, English Hard of Hearing
Bonus:
  • Feature Commentary with Director Eli Roth and Actor Jack Black
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Gag Reel
  • Warlocks and Witches
  • Movie Magic
  • Tick Tock: Bringing the Book to Life
  • Eli Roth: Director's Journals
  • Owen Goes Behind the Scenes
  • Do You Know Jack Black?
  • Jack Black's Greatest Fear
  • The Mighty Wurlitzer

Rent other films like The House with a Clock in Its Walls

Reviews (8) of The House with a Clock in Its Walls

Good fun but may be scary for really young - The House with a Clock in Its Walls review by PC

Spoiler Alert

Although not highly original, it is quite nice to get a family film with real scares and creepy moments, although this may be a bit scary for the younger viewers. It moves along at a good pace and has good use of old fashioned effects rather than constant CGI. Jack Black plays Jack Black but Cate Blanchett is great fun as his neighbour and sparring partner.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Entertaining - The House with a Clock in Its Walls review by SM

Spoiler Alert

Fairly simple plot, but moves along at a good pace as mentioned by other reviewers. Plenty of special effects and a good performance from young Owen Vaccaro. Little kids may be frightened, but most kids that like Harry Potter should be well entertained.

0 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

A poor transfer. - The House with a Clock in Its Walls review by Billynedwell

Spoiler Alert

Decided to take a look at this film, despite a lot of less than complimentary reviews of the story, as the 4k blu ray reviews all mentioned the great soundtrack and reference HDR video transfer. Once the main menu had loaded and after selecting the audio sub menu it soon became clear this disc was not as the retail version. The only audio track available was the lossless DTS HD MA track. Now don't get me wrong, this audio track is still capable of getting your speakers to sing like a nightingale and slam like an angry rhino but it's not the all conquering enveloping object based Atmos soundtrack I was expecting. As it still sounded good I continued to the movie. This is were this disc became a total let down. The picture was extremely washed out. The contrast was nowhere near being HDR and absolutely no colour pop at all. If the UHD resolution wasn't there I would swear I was watching a DVD. After 8 minutes I stopped the disc and put in one of my own 4k blu rays to check my equipment was working correctly. Thankfully my copy of Planet Earth II immediately filled the screen with vibrant colour and glorious HDR images.

Don't rent this disc if you are desperate to see the demo worthy 4k UHD HDR blu ray that all the disc reviewers have been shouting about. I would suggest you wait for the price to drop and then go buy the retail disc.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

The House with a Clock in Its Walls review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

In the same year that horror-loving director Eli Roth directed a film where Bruce Willis spilled blood and bullets on the streets of Chicago, he has additionally created a PG horror film for kids with The House With A Clock In Its Walls. It sounds odd that a director could go from exploding brains to exploding pumpkins, but Roth found a way to keep himself boiled down to the level of family entertainment. Too far down, as it turns out, as though he only read half the book on Robert Rodriguez’s guide to making genre pictures for kids.

Made under the Amblin banner of movies for children, it's a fantasy fit for the kids. Set in the 1950s, Lewis (Owen Vaccaro) is a newly orphaned genius boy that has come to stay with his Uncle Jonathan (Jack Black) in his spooky house of secrets. For any other kid, Jonathan’s home would be a paradise for featuring no rules, no bedtimes, and freshly-baked chocolate chip cookies for every meal. But Lewis knows there is something more going on in the house. He suspects as much when the glass painting on the wall mutates overnight, the chairs start moving on their own, and his dreams feature the ghost of his dead parents giving him very specific advice.

Lewis is astounded to discover that the root of the weirdness is magic itself. And he wants to learn all, to become just as impressive a warlock as Jonathan, or possibly better given Jonathan’s rusty fingers with conjuring spells. Maybe as powerful as their neighbor Florence (Cate Blanchett), a well-dressed witch with an accessory of an umbrella that doubles as a wand, and possibly a shotgun depending on how she wields her magic. With his newfound abilities, Lewis sets about becoming the less meek kid in school, impressing bullies and girls. But that’s not all. There’s also a mysterious clock hidden inside Jonathan’s walls that keeps ticking, driving him mad. And there’s Jonathan’s old nemesis of his ex-magic partner played by Kyle MacLachlan that has a doomsday plot up his undead sleeve.

The movie has all the elements of pleasing spooky film, but ultimately never comes fully together, existing as a series of amusing scenes that don’t have much of a flow. The best scenes are without question the back and forth between Black and Blanchett, firing snarky comments with witty delivery at a zippy pace. I wish the rest of the film could have had this intelligence and timing. The closest it comes is with the many scary setpieces of mechanical puppets come to life and evil pumpkins that barf orange innards. But there are so many little flaws holding the film back from gaining any momentum. The biggest direction being the acting, where Black with temporarily gain and lose an accent, and Owen Vaccaro has a serious issue with his wailing being far too over the top to buy the somberness. And why did they have to give Kyle MacLachlan a tinny demonic voice alteration when it clearly doesn’t work?

These are all nitpicks that took me out of the picture, but I can’t deny that there’s just enough here that kids will dig it far more than the adults, per the Amblin formula. There’s a handful of magical scenes, a moral core about being different, and an abundance of low-brow jokes that are just vulgar enough to have the kids laughing as much as they’ll be spooked. They’ll be entranced enough that they won’t notice how there are too many plots spinning that either go too slow or peter out of the picture. And for that I can’t help but admire the film like Halloween night, an event that only kids will have the most fun experiencing.

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