Rent Parasite (2019)

4.1 of 5 from 989 ratings
2h 8min
Rent Parasite (aka Gisaengchung) Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
Kim Ki Taek's (Song Kang Ho) family are all unemployed and living in a squalid basement. When his son, Ki Woo, gets a tutoring job at the lavish home of the Park family, the Kim family's luck changes. One by one they gradually infiltrate the wealthy Park's home, attempting to take over their affluent lifestyle, but as their deception unravels events begin to get increasingly out of hand in ways you simply cannot imagine.
Actors:
, , , , So-dam Park, Jeong-eun Lee, , , , Jung Hyeon-jun, , Jeong Esuz, Jo Jae-Myeong, Ik-han Jung, , Hwang In Kyung, , Kim Jin Hyung, Yoon Young-woo, JaeWook Park
Directors:
Producers:
Bong Joon Ho, Sin Ae Kwak, Moon Yang Kwon
Writers:
Joon-Ho Bong, Jin-won Han
Others:
Jin Won, Bong Joon-ho, Kwak Sin-ae, Kwak Sin Ae, Bong Joon Ho, Yang Jinmo, Lee Ha Jun, Cho Won Woo, Han Jin Won
Aka:
Gisaengchung
Studio:
Curzon / Artificial Eye
Genres:
Comedy, Drama, Thrillers
Countries:
Korea, Top 100 Films, Comedy, Drama, Thrillers
Awards:

2020 BAFTA Best Foreign Film

2020 BAFTA Best Original Screen Play

2020 Oscar Best Picture

2020 Oscar Best Director

2020 Oscar Best Foreign Film

2020 Oscar Best Original Screen Play

2019 Cannes Palme d'Or

BBFC:
Release Date:
01/06/2020
Run Time:
128 minutes
Languages:
Korean
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BBFC:
Release Date:
01/06/2020
Run Time:
132 minutes
Languages:
Korean DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Korean LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Making of
  • Deleted scenes
  • Director Q and A
  • Trailers
BBFC:
Release Date:
23/11/2020
Run Time:
139 minutes
Languages:
Korean Audio Description, Korean DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1, Korean LPCM Stereo
Subtitles:
English, English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.39:1
Colour:
B & W
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Making Of
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Director Q and A
  • Trailers

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Reviews (28) of Parasite

Worthy oscar winner - Parasite review by PC

Spoiler Alert
24/02/2020

I was unsure whether I would enjoy this film and I cannot say too much without giving away spoilers. Suffice to say that it is well acted, hugely original, funny and uncomfortable in equal measures. Give it a chance even if you do not like subtitles you will not see another film like it.

9 out of 12 members found this review helpful.

Excellently crafted, highly engaging film - Parasite review by CS

Spoiler Alert
31/05/2020

Focusing on the interweaving of two families - one rich and one poor - this is a superbly shot and acted film which manages to be dramatic, funny and occasionally violent without in any way compromising the strong and coherent storyline which makes it such a good view. Definitely deserved the awards it has received.  

7 out of 10 members found this review helpful.

Long build-up descends into silly farce - Parasite review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
14/06/2020

Seduced by the Oscar-winning hype, anyone hoping for another movie as riveting as Shoplifters will be disappointed. It’s engaging enough if you stick with it, but it’s over-ripe, long-winded and far too cumbersome for its 2hr run-time. A family of four ingratiate themselves as home helps into a wealthy family’s confidence. When things start to go wrong (after a whole hour) it descends into farce. No spoilers about the outcome, but by the end you probably won’t care what happens.

Bong Joon-Ho is a great director but this isn’t his best screenplay. If you also thought Snowpiercer, his one American movie, was a dud (not his fault), do yourself a favour and watch The Host or Memories of Murder.

5 out of 9 members found this review helpful.

BLACK comedy! - Parasite review by GregB

Spoiler Alert
26/11/2020

I watched it because of the Oscar publicity, but was disappointed. Without giving too much away there is rather more gore than I would normally want to watch. None of the leading protagonists had much by way of appealing characteristics.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Parasite (aka Gisaengchung) review by Mark McPherson - Cinema Paradiso

Bong Joon-ho’s films have a personal yet international appeal in terms of themes addressed. Throughout his work is a clear observation on class struggle, often posed through a sci-fi allegory that often goes soberingly blunt at times. Parasite is his most vicious film for this aspect, tackling class division head-on in a thriller that starts off darkly comedic and turns just plain dark by the end of the picture.

In South Korea, a family of four struggles to make ends meet from their basement apartment. They leech wi-fi to find gigs, take on jobs of making pizza boxes for little money, and rely on the community bug-sprayer for free fumigation, while they’re in the apartment. Desperate for any job they can find, the son gets a bit of luck when a friend recommends him as a tutor for a wealthy family, residing high up in the rich part of town. With the aid of his family, he is able to stage his way into the good graces of this rich yet easily outsmarted family.

The son then recognizes openings, desires that could be fulfilled by the rest of the family. The entire poor family construct an elaborate plan to all acquire jobs within the lavish estate. They pretend not to know each other and fabricate just enough information on their skills to be hired. This ranges from the simple deception of the daughter pretending she’s enough of an art expert to be hired for tutoring the young boy of the rich household to finding a way to fire the current house maid for the poor mother to move in.

For the first half of the film, it’s a well-tuned dark comedy of a poor family deceiving a rich family. Their plan is so complex and rehearsed that it’s an immaculate play of trying to make a living that is pleasing for the assembly and morally questionable considering their attack against the maid is to fake her having TB. The poor family becomes so good at their gig that it seems as though they’re headed down a path to being the antagonists of this picture, especially for a heated moment they all have together when it seems their lives are all figured out. But then there’s that twist lurking in the rich home’s basement that drastically shifts the picture into a much more sinister and earth-shaking film that is absolutely frightening and shocking.

Bong’s style is in top form with this picture in how he stages the entire picture. There’s the obvious symbolism in the way the rich and poor families are housed, the destitute underground and the well-to-do residing high. But there’s something compelling in nearly every frame. Take a look at every shot within the rich family’s home. Every shot seems to have something dividing the rich and poor, be it a wall, a pillar, or a line in the paths. One of the most memorable shots features the maid addressing the matriarch of the house, seen through a window with a separating pane. The maid claps her hands across the divide, waking up the sleeping mother. It’s a subtle yet effective and iconic take on the crossing of lines that will come to violent blows in the more explosive third-act climax.

Bong stated in an interview that he intended Parasite to be more of a Korean specific film unlike his previous pictures of Snowpiercer and Okja. He want to highlight the horrific divide of class and the crashing problems in capitalism that breeds this discontent. He was a bit surprised to discover this was just as big a problem in America as it was in Korea, generating an international appeal that most likely led to Bong selling the rights for an American remake. Whether the remake will be too watered down is anybody’s guess, but as it stands, Parasite is such a perfect picture for tackling the current concerns of eating the rich in a beautifully staged and deeply uncomfortable film, more than worthy of becoming the first South Korean film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.