Rent Cold in July (2014)

3.3 of 5 from 412 ratings
1h 46min
Rent Cold in July Online DVD & Blu-ray Rental
  • General info
  • Available formats
Synopsis:
While investigating noises in his house one balmy Texas night in 1989, Richard Dane puts a bullet in the brain of low-life burglar Freddy Russell. Although he's hailed as a small-town hero, Dane soon finds himself fearing for his family's safety when Freddy's ex-con father rolls into town, hell-bent on revenge.
Actors:
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Directors:
Producers:
Rene Bastian, Adam Folk, Linda Moran, Marie Savare
Writers:
Nick Damici, Joe R. Lansdale
Studio:
Icon
Genres:
Drama, Thrillers
BBFC:
Release Date:
20/10/2014
Run Time:
106 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
DVD Regions:
Region 2
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
Bonus:
  • Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Jim Mickle, Star Michael C. Hall, and Writer/Actor Nick Damici
  • Deleted Scenes
BBFC:
Release Date:
20/10/2014
Run Time:
110 minutes
Languages:
English
Subtitles:
English Hard of Hearing
Formats:
Pal
Aspect Ratio:
Widescreen 2.40:1
Colour:
Colour
BLU-RAY Regions:
B
Bonus:
  • Audio Commentary with Writer/Director Jim Mickle, Star Michael C. Hall, and Writer/Actor Nick Damici
  • Deleted Scenes

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Reviews (6) of Cold in July

Disappointing - the ridiculous storyline makes this more silly than thrilling - Cold in July review by RP

Spoiler Alert
25/12/2014

I waited to write a review for this film until I'd watched 'Mulberry Street' and 'Stakeland', also directed by Jim Mickle and which came highly recommended. While formulaic (respectively, nasty virus turns normal Americans into flesh-eating rats, road movie with added vampires) I quite enjoyed them - they were well done, for their budget and within their budget. So, would Jim Mickle succeed with this crime thriller genre film?

In a word, no. It's not the fault of the direction, which isn't at all bad - it's the storyline, which is frankly, silly, unbelievable tripe. But unfortunately Mr Mickle shares writing credits for the script.

I haven't read the novel on which the film is based, but the storyline of the film goes like this: Central character shoots intruder. Intruder's father seeks revenge. Local cops try to kill intruder's father by leaving him on train track; it turns out that intruder was someone entirely different, and the father's real son is a nasty individual involved in porno snuff films and all the time hidden within the witness protection programme. Confused? You will be.

The central role is played rather well by Michael C. Hall, who manages to get us to feel a little sympathy for a weak and somewhat unlikeable character. And that's about it - the story is so ridiculous that the other actors (Sam Shepard, Don Johnson and the director's sidekick Nick Damici) simply cannot make their characters appear anything other than silly.

I really liked the two other Jim Mickle films I have seen but this was a great disappointment. There's plenty of violent shooting and bloodshed, but although it has a twist or two it's more silly than thrilling. Of course, mutant viruses and vampires are silly too, but that's to be expected - with a crime thriller there has to be something realistic to relate to. And there's nothing here, except perhaps the initial 'fear of intruders' - after that it's downhill. Sorry, Jim.

2/5 stars - below average, and it's all down to the ridiculous storyline.

1 out of 1 members found this review helpful.

Misogynistic tedium - Cold in July review by PS

Spoiler Alert
05/12/2015

The only female characters are the terrified little wife who is not allowed a voice (and is lied to by her husband), and the terrified little girl who is sexually abused and murdered on video. Our shoot-em-up macho heroes show no respect for women at all. How are films like this still being made? Is it claimed that this is 'ironic'?

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Top-drawer thriller - Cold in July review by Alphaville

Spoiler Alert
02/04/2016

This is a tense, closely observed thriller that develops into an enthralling watch. As usual these days, avoid the tell-tale trailer because if you think you know where this is going you’ll be wrong. Minor quibbles are a terrible title and a lack of oomph in places, although a dramatic electro score does wonders to up the ante. There’s also a clichéd family-man-finds-his-mojo subtext, most of which thankfully appears to have ended up on the cutting room floor.

Against this, it’s a pleasure to see Don Johnson still strutting his stuff. He turns up half-way through as a pig-farming private eye and steals every scene he’s in. It’s no spoiler to sat that the climax would be worthy of any western. Jim Mickle made one of the great vampire movies in Stakeland and this is on a par.

0 out of 0 members found this review helpful.

Critic review

Cold in July review by Alyse Garner - Cinema Paradiso

If you were to ask me to name the best zombie and vampire film’s I’ve seen in the last ten years I’m not sure I’d go with 28 Days and I’d definitely avoid the dreadful Twilight series, I think, after giving it much deliberation, I would probably come up with two small movies by a horror director that some of you might still not even have heard of, Jim Mickie’s Mulberry Street and Stake Land.

Turning his directorial gaze away from the horror genre however Mickie has made his first foray into a new genre, the crime thriller, adapting a film from another name that will smack for many of the horror genre, Joe R. Lansdale’s Cold in July. As if this writing and directorial combination were not enough however throw in a lead performance from one of the most versatile actors of recent years, Michael C. Hall (Dexter, Six Feet Under, Paycheck, Kill Your Darlings – the list goes on), and Cold in July was certainly going to be interesting, if nothing else.

What begins as simple revenge plot when Hall’s Richard Dane shoots and kills an intruder in his home in Texas and the intruder’s father begins following Dane’s family seeking retribution, turns into a paranoid fuelled narrative that twists around the characters causing you to question everything you thought you knew and believed about the world you are seeing on screen.

Hall, as ever, steals the show. His depiction of Richard is masterful, he manages to make us sympathize with a frankly unlikeable character, whilst his portrayal of Dane’s fear and uncertainty rattles your very bones. Sam Shepard is an excellent villain whilst Don Johnson’s flamboyant P.I is both unexpected and brilliant.

As with all great crime thrillers these are the words you look for, unexpected, uncertain, paranoid, however to pull them off with confidence, particularly on one’s first venture into the genre, is quite a feat and, thanks to both his own talent and the prestige of the material he was given to work with, Mickie achieves this with ease. I look forward to seeing how he fares in future ventures, perhaps a twist on the romantic comedy?

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